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Personal Learning Networks for the 21st Century School Leader

This is a copy of my presentation on PLNs before this year's cohort of NAIS Aspiring Heads of Schools!
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Personal and professional learning networks
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Learning Theory - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory - What are the established learning theories? | ppln | Scoop.it
This Concept Map, created with IHMC CmapTools, has information related to: Learning Theory, zone of proximal development The area of capabilities that learners can exhibit with support from a teacher., Montessori constructivism, Lave & Wenger...

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Franc Viktor Nekrep's curator insight, August 25, 2013 4:32 AM

add your insight...

 
Katie Frank's curator insight, August 25, 2013 10:58 AM

Comprehensive concept map!

JUAN NUÑEZ MESINA's curator insight, May 1, 7:13 PM

Compartiendo conceptos...

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Learning and the Emerging Science of Behavior Change, aka 'Nudging' | Ben Williamson

Learning and the Emerging Science of Behavior Change, aka 'Nudging' | Ben Williamson | ppln | Scoop.it

"The emerging field of behaviour change theory suggests new ways in which networked technologies might be used as a form of pedagogical persuasion to influence and shape learners’ behavior, even at the unconscious or irrational level."

Comment: A very interesting and thought-provoking reflection on current changes in pedagogical climate, which are very much exemplified by the move towards networked learning. Williamson first notes the prevalence of terms such as softness and openness. This, he contends, amounts to softening up education: "As opposed to the hard education of canonical core content, the softened school of the future does not impose rigid academic barricades against informal learning outside school". This new open education paradigm is characterised by open educational resources, an emphasis on soft skills, and most of all soft (libertarian) paternalism: "policies and practices which are designed in such a way that they are intended to subtly shape and change behavior". This is the nudging referred to in the title. So, in networks for learning, we do not coerce people into doing what we think they should. In stead, we monitor them and try to subtly persuade them to move into the 'right' direction: "The learner enmeshed in digitally mediated networks is forever being nudged from afar rather than instructed; subtly tutored instead of lectured". The problem with this, Williamson says, is that it comes dangerously close to being manipulative: "... as the language of 21st century learning becomes increasingly saturated with new “open” and networked formats and new “soft” behavioral competencies it may become hard to distinguish from the soft control techniques of behavioral optimization programs, soft performance, and other political strategies of subtle psychological persuasion"
Indeed, if you can't get things your way by bullying people, you 'sweet talk' them into it. And whereas bullying is at least obvious (even if you have no way to to escape it), with nudging the victim herself may start to belief this is in her best interest. It is a real danger, but I still prefer arguments, even if they are 'sweetened', as opposed to intimidation. Ultimately, it is a matter of ethics. As much as resarchers should tell their subjects what the experiment is intended for, so should learners be told what they are getting themselves involved in. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, December 20, 2012 12:25 PM

A very interesting and thought-provoking reflection on current changes in pedagogical climate, which are very much exemplified by the move towards networked learning. Williamson first notes the prevalence of terms such as softness and openness. This, he contends, amounts to softening up education: "As opposed to the hard education of canonical core content, the softened school of the future does not impose rigid academic barricades against informal learning outside school". This new open education paradigm is characterised by open educational resources, an emphasis on soft skills, and most of all soft (libertarian) paternalism: "policies and practices which are designed in such a way that they are intended to subtly shape and change behavior". This is the nudging referred to in the title. So, in networks for learning, we do not coerce people into doing what we think they should. In stead, we monitor them and try to subtly persuade them to move into the 'right' direction: "The learner enmeshed in digitally mediated networks is forever being nudged from afar rather than instructed; subtly tutored instead of lectured". The problem with this, Williamson says, is that it comes dangerously close to being manipulative: "... as the language of 21st century learning becomes increasingly saturated with new “open” and networked formats and new “soft” behavioral competencies it may become hard to distinguish from the soft control techniques of behavioral optimization programs, soft performance, and other political strategies of subtle psychological persuasion"
Indeed, if you can't get things your way by bullying people, you 'sweet talk' them into it. And whereas bullying is at least obvious (even if you have no way to to escape it), with nudging the victim herself may start to belief this is in her best interest. It is a real danger, but I still prefer arguments, even if they are 'sweetened', as opposed to intimidation. Ultimately, it is a matter of ethics. As much as resarchers should tell their subjects what the experiment is intended for, so should learners be told what they are getting themselves involved in. (@pbsloep)

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How To Be A Happy And Successful Creative Freelancer (Or Work With One)

How To Be A Happy And Successful Creative Freelancer (Or Work With One) | ppln | Scoop.it

Some ideas here on organising, relating to personal and professional networks and of course clients.

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On elephants, obsessions and wicked problems: A new phenomenology of news

On elephants, obsessions and wicked problems: A new phenomenology of news | ppln | Scoop.it

Gideon Lichfield argues that reporters and news media should follow obsessions - emerging stories - not traditional beats defined by institutions and specialisms. Lots of cross-over with sense-making by curators and social reporters.

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The Content Economy: How I consume and share social and digital media

The Content Economy: How I consume and share social and digital media | ppln | Scoop.it

Oscar Berg shares his set up for personal knowledge management

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Personal Learning Networks: why? « Patrick's Blog

Personal Learning Networks: why? « Patrick's Blog | ppln | Scoop.it
I first came across the term “personal learning network” in a blog post about five years ago (possibly this one from 2008, or this one or maybe this one – or maybe not!). The phrase was new to me, and frankly I didn't ...
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A quick case for social technologies | Harold Jarche

A quick case for social technologies | Harold Jarche | ppln | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche:

I have been reviewing a number of resources I have collected on social media, social learning and return on investment. The bottom line seems very clear to me. Social technologies remove artificial organizational boundaries and let knowledge be shared more easily.

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CurTion of Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) ideas

CurTion of Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) ideas | ppln | Scoop.it

It is clear many individuals are USING THE SOCIAL WEB FOR THIER OWN PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. But for this to be effective it needs to be underpinned by effective Personal Knowledge Management (PKM).

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Personal Learning Networks for the 21st Century School Leader

This is a copy of my presentation on PLNs before this year's cohort of NAIS Aspiring Heads of Schools!
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Curation Is As Important as Creation

Curation Is As Important as Creation | ppln | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If you are interested in understanding how "content curation" differentiates itself from simple re-sharing and re-blogging here is a great article by Chris DeLine.


Great advice for anyone wanting to become an effective content curator: “Whether in tweets, in blog posts, in podcasts, or in newsletters, be ruthless with your attention.


...


Some adopt a strategy of blanket-curation, throwing everything new or fresh or remotely interesting online and letting other consumers make their own value distinctions.


Others assume the role of tastemaker, selectively making the decisions themselves.


Both have their place, but the former contributes to what Jonathan Haidt calls “the paradox of abundance,” which he says “undermines the quality of our engagement.”

How many content-overload websites can you monitor before you become overwhelmed by volume? How many share-explosions does it take before you remove a friend from your Facebook feed? How many Tumblr pages can you pay attention to before the reblogs become a blur?


...

Thoughtful, honest, and caring curation isn’t entirely different than creation.


After all, the topics you choose to research, to blog about, and to discuss with friends all begin with the process of sifting through the media abyss yourself and singling out worthwhile information."


What really counts is to create content that is useful, meaningful and helpful for others, whether from direct hand authorship, or by curating the best existing resources.


Insightful. 8/10


http://chrisdeline.com/curation


(Image credit: Shutterstock)



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Sinan Zirić's curator insight, January 19, 2013 11:50 AM

This is an excellent Curation review.

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Barriers to PKM

Barriers to PKM | ppln | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago I asked my extended online network, “What do you think is the biggest fear/need/barrier when it comes to adopting personal knowledge management (PKM) as a practice?
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News Discovery and Topic Monitoring: The Protopage RSS Reader and Start Page

News Discovery and Topic Monitoring: The Protopage RSS Reader and Start Page | ppln | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Protopage is a free web service which allows you to easily monitor any keyword, hashtag, topic, RSS feed (and OPML files too) or web site on a custom, personalized private web page.

You can add as many "search" and monitoring widgets to your page and create multiple tabs to monitor and check different topics without creating excessive clutter.

 

Widgets can contain dozen of different information objects besides searches, including video feeds, news, audio podcasts, bookmarks, maps, and a lot more. Check all the widgets you can add here: http://i.imgur.com/BseEu.jpg

 

Try it out now: http://www.protopage.com/

 

 


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mrstock's comment, August 30, 2012 7:39 AM
@Robin Good - agree but it still looks like Microsoft c1995 !
Michael Cerda's comment, September 6, 2012 9:46 AM
Protopage works as a replacement for igoogle. Between the bookmark list, embedded code widget and the web page widget you can do almost anything igoogle did. The thing to note that has bothered me the most is that after a couple of months of use advertisements appeared on the page. You can get rid of them for $2.50 a month. That is more than I would pay. $1 a month, sure. The other real problem is that there doesn't appear to be any way to communicate with the company. There is no publicly accessible forum and no email contact. Protopage is not the prettiest but it can work.
Robin Good's comment, September 6, 2012 11:59 AM
Thank you Michael for sharing this info. Very useful.
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Internet and Social Networks: The Good, Bad and the Ugly - The Nation

"Social networking is seen as a private virtual space for likeminded people to share information. Is it really a private space? How it could be private when all the information is in the hands of few people who own and run Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn and Twitter?"

Comment: learning in and with social networks is inextricably intertwined with issue of privacy and online identity formation. Only if 'we' know a lot about online learners, recommenders that suggest learning opportunities and buddies can do their work. However, providing such private data as your learning habits and interests threatens your privacy. (peter sloep)


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Mapping Media to the Curriculum » What do you want to CREATE today?

Mapping Media to the Curriculum » What do you want to CREATE today? | ppln | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the content...


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Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, December 2, 2012 12:00 PM
You're most welcome LuAnne! Glad you find them useful; I do as well :-)
Nancy Jones's comment, February 10, 2013 12:02 PM
This is a gold mine of info. Thanks
Gary Harwell's curator insight, March 5, 2013 11:54 PM

Something interesting to pass on ot teachers

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Reflection on Learning under Connectivism

Reflection on Learning under Connectivism | ppln | Scoop.it
What is learning?  Peter Sloep posted here in response to a post by Steve Wheeler. One of the characteristics of learning through digital media is the ability to crowd source content, ideas and art...

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Elahe Amani's comment, October 1, 2012 7:01 PM
This of course is true with teaching and learning outside classroom...
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Personal versus professional social networks: infographic

Personal versus professional social networks: infographic | ppln | Scoop.it
That there are significant differences between personal social networks, like Facebook, and professional social networks, like LinkedIn, seems obvious.
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Principal dd's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:38 PM

Finding balance and connection at the same time ... quite a challenge in our busy lives. These graphics provide good starting points and reminders.

Principaldd

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What happens when news organizations move from “beats” to “obsessions”?

What happens when news organizations move from “beats” to “obsessions”? | ppln | Scoop.it

C.W Anderson "The structure of newsrooms reflects how journalists think about their work. As those conceptions change, it makes sense that the structures would change with them".

This ties in with my emerging idea of socialreporter explorations http://socialreporters.net/?page_id=552

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Social Networking as a PLE » Genius On Hold

Social Networking as a PLE » Genius On Hold | ppln | Scoop.it
Looking at social media skills in terms of Bloom's Taxonomy and personal learning networks shows just how iterative learning should be. — Rebecca Thomas (@kirylin) July 25, 2012. Over the past few weeks, I've been ...
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Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age

Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age | ppln | Scoop.it
www.connectivism.ca “…the connections that enable us to learn more are more important than our current state of knowing.” George Siemens In this piece George Siemens argues...

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Learning in a Social Organization (LISO): a clickable guide | Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies

Jane Hart:

Many individuals have now taken charge of their own PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL LEARNING, (most of which take place outside the organization) in particular by USING THE SOCIAL WEB to build a set of PERSONAL tools and services which includes those to:

CONNECT & CONVERSE with others in their PLNs (personal learning networks)
SHARE knowledge, experiences and resources
CURATE CONTENT from different sources
CREATE & SHARE CONTENT as well as
COLLABORATE with them in many different ways

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The 21st Century Principal: Personal Network Literacy: 6 Key PLN ...

The 21st Century Principal: Personal Network Literacy: 6 Key PLN ... | ppln | Scoop.it
Here’s my own short list of personal learning network literacies educators need to have.
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Hierarchical conversations | Harold Jarche

Hierarchical conversations | Harold Jarche | ppln | Scoop.it
MT: The great challenge: how do u explain networked learning 2 people who have never experienced it?
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Thinking in networks | Learning with 'e's

'Build your network and always think in networks. They create a sonor map of intelligence, expertise, information and insight. Your allies, your connections, can help you to navigate the larger number of challenges that can ...
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Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence

Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence | ppln | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Participatory culture writer and book author Henry Jenkins interviews cyberculture pioneer Howard Rheingold (Net Smart, 2012) by asking him to explain some of the concepts that have helped him become a paladin of the  and "new literacies" so essential for survival in the always-on information-world we live in today.

 

This is part three of a long and in-depth interview (Part 2, Part 1) covering key concepts and ideas as the value of "community" and "networks", the architecture of participation, affinity working spaces, and curation.

Here is a short excerpt of Howard response to a question about curation and its value as both a “fundamental building block” of networked communities and as an important form of participation:

 

Howard Rheingold: "...at the fundamental level, curation depends on individuals making mindful and informed decisions in a publicly detectable way.

 

Certainly just clicking on a link, “liking” or “plussing” an item online, adding a tag to a photograph is a lightweight element that can be aggregated in valuable ways (ask Facebook).

 

But the kind of curation that is already mining the mountains of Internet ore for useful and trustworthy nuggets of knowledge, and the kind that will come in the future, has a strong literacy element.

 

Curators don’t just add good-looking resources to lists, or add their vote through a link or like, they summarize and contextualize in their own words, explicitly explain why the resource is worthy of attention, choose relevant excerpts, tag thoughtfully, group resources and clearly describe the grouping criteria."

 

In other words, "curators" are the ones creating the metadata needed to empower our emerging collective intelligence.

 

Curation Is The Social Choice About What Is Worth Paying Attention To.

 

Good stuff. In-depth. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full interview: http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-three.html

 

 


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Shaz J's comment, September 3, 2012 3:20 AM
You're welcome :)

It's interesting interesting that you mention POV and stance, as that is not something I had explicitly articulated for myself, but naturally it must be implicitly true. In that sense, it reminds me (again) that curation forces self-reflection in order to present the content better, and that can only be a good thing.
Liz Renshaw's comment, September 8, 2012 9:57 PM
Agree with posts about curation guiding self reflection. This interview in particular is top value and two of my fav people indeed.
SilviaArano's comment, October 3, 2012 2:57 AM
Thanks your for this
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What Is Content Curation: My Collection of the Best Definitions

What Is Content Curation: My Collection of the Best Definitions | ppln | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Since I get asked over and over to define "content curation" in a few words, I have invested some time in gathering and culling what I deem to be the most appropriate and useful definitions of "content curation" available online.

Here is a pretty comprehensive picture of what "content curation" is from my personal viewpoint.

 

Grid view: http://bundlr.com/b/content-curation-definition

 

List view: http://bundlr.com/b/content-curation-definition?order=normal&view=timeline

 

 

P.S.: If you are aware of good ones that should fit this collection, please let me know in the comments.

 

 


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