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Power Upper Elementary
Upper Elementary grades 5-6
Curated by Kathy Boyd
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7 habits of highly effective teachers Always Prepped Blog

7 habits of highly effective teachers Always Prepped Blog | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teachers Who Use Technology: http://t.co/ijyBdML0 #edchat #edtech #teaching #education #ntchat...
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Helping Students Deal with Loss

Helping Students Deal with Loss | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it
This education article discusses how teachers can help their students work through the grieving process, both personally and as they transition back into school.
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4 Tips to Address Late, Missing Homework

4 Tips to Address Late, Missing Homework | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it
While there is no magic answer or easy solution, here are four tips on how to deal with students’ deficient work habits and late / missing homework.
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Educational Leadership:Giving Students Meaningful Work:Five Hallmarks of Good Homework

Educational Leadership:Giving Students Meaningful Work:Five Hallmarks of Good Homework | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.
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Consequences for whom? Rethinking the "C" Word

Consequences for whom?  Rethinking the "C" Word | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it

This is a great entry by Joe Bower, a progressive teacher from Alberta.  He attempts to dispell misconceptions around the purpose and effectiveness of the consequences mentality:  "get a bigger hammer and we will change the kid". 

 

"If we really care about character growth and ethical development in children, we have to stop managing their behaviors and start working with them as safe and caring allies. We need to stop seeing misbehavior as this thing to be squashed out and start seeing misbehavior as problems to be solved together."

 

Ross Greene's Collaborative Problem Solving that asserts "children will do well if they can" is mentioned.   This model puts the student in the driver's seat when it comes to identifying and solving the problem from their lens.  The teacher facilitates and it is a joint venture borne out of a trusting relationship. 

 

"It takes courage not to punish, and it takes real effort to see misbehavior as an opportunity for the teacher to teach and the student to learn."

 

Additionally, I'd like to challenge the notion that "consequence" is about what adults DO after problems.  Theoretically, this is about whatever happens "after" to either make things better or worse.  This is often misunderstood. 

 

The teacher's role, in our highly complex social contexts, is to facilitate learning-  math, science and people skills, as well.  Proactive measures are most effective.  The relationship is the vehicle for problem solving together  when snafus arise. 


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Colleen Ray's curator insight, August 18, 9:39 AM

"Children do well if they can." Ross Greene...

Collaborative problem solving works.  I love the idea that trusted adults/teachers/parents join the child to problem solve and facilitate change.  It works!

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Eight Ways to Build Positive Relationships with Families - Middle Level iNSIDER

Eight Ways to Build Positive Relationships with Families - Middle Level iNSIDER | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it
Here are eight ways teachers and teams can build great relationships with students' families.
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Educational Leadership:Students Who Challenge Us:Eight Things Skilled Teachers Think, Say, and Do

Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.
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The 25 Best #Pinterest Boards in Educational #Technology

The 25 Best #Pinterest Boards in Educational #Technology | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it

Blogs and Twitter aren’t the only social tools out there that can help you keep up with the latest and greatest developments in educational technology. Pinterest is rapidly becoming a favorite tool of educators all over the nation, and many have amassed some pretty great collections of edtech-related pins that teachers and students alike can use to explore new ways to learn, share, teach, and grow.

 

While it would be nearly impossible to highlight every edtech pinboard out there, we’ve shared some of the boards we think stand out among the crowd here. Many are maintained by major educational websites, key figures in edtech, and well-known bloggers, but others were created by teachers just like you who simply want to share resources and tips with others in education.


Via janlgordon, AlexaSocialMedia - Social Media & Community Management
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Educational Leadership:Students Who Challenge Us:Ferrari Engines, Bicycle Brakes

Educational Leadership:Students Who Challenge Us:Ferrari Engines, Bicycle Brakes | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.
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Twitter / sjunkins: Twitter Cheat Sheet. #edtech ...

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3 tips for teachers new to Twitter

3 tips for teachers new to Twitter | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it
A colleague who knows that Twitter is my favorite social space stuck her head in my room the other day with a complaint.
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The MAGIC of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (done well)

The MAGIC of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (done well) | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it

I have been a Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports coach at the building, district and county level for a decade.  I coach teams with three-year implementation plans that include universal, targeted and individual systems.  PBIS at the school-wide level is a framework under which schools can create sustainable culture change in their building. 

 

 The magic in PBIS, from my perspective, is that it is a teaching model that creates a positive, consistent and proactive system for teaching and acknowledging the "right things" within the highly social context of a school.  The kids know what is expected because they are taught.  All adults give specific praise when they see positive interactions. There is a coherent and predictable system in place to guide students and teachers when students are off-track.  The principal, teachers, bus drivers all teach what they expect and acknowledge when they see it.  Kids can also acknowledge peers. 

 

This is about consistency.  Culture change.  Social competence. Creating consistent routines in common areas and teaching them so kids don't have to learn via trial and error.   Implemented as intended-  PBIS can  produce lasting change and calm, predictable environments.  

 

Rewards, stickers and tangibles are not necessary, unless a building chooses to do so based on their population and unique individual needs. Specific praise is the issue. From the State Of Michigan's Manual  (http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/SchoolwidePBS_264634_7.pdf): 

"Generous quantities of positive adult/teacher attention and other kinds of reinforcement to students for demonstrating positive behaviors, especially specific behavior expectationsl"  A smile is reinforcing!  : )

 

Keep in mind that for children from impoverished communities discipline should be instructive.  Teaching is paramount.   

 

The fundamentals: 

 

1.  Teach what we want to see

2.  Intervene early

3.  Use multi-level model (so that suspension/special education are not the only option)

4.  Use research based interventions

5.  Use data to make decisions

 

 

The TA Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports has been established by the Office of Special Education Programs, US Department of Education to give schools capacity-building information and technical assistance for identifying, adapting, and sustaining effective school-wide disciplinary practices.

 

 

 

Great overview from PBIS.org   http://pbis.org/school/primary_level/default.aspx


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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The Difference Between Praise & Acknowledgment | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

The Difference Between Praise & Acknowledgment | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it

Wow.  " Acknowledgments encourage and motivate. They
serve to give recognition without the disadvantages of
praise. "   Read on if you want to know more.  I'm pondering.......my ideas are changing.  Thank you Larry!


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Twitter / ColePrincipal: Why we should let children ...

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Figuring out how the Pieces Fit ... - Home - Connecting Media Literacy and the Common Core ...

Figuring out how the Pieces Fit ... - Home - Connecting Media Literacy and the Common Core ... | Power Upper Elementary | Scoop.it
At the beginning of September, I wrote a blog post, What do we need to become good consumers of ... (RT @mwedwards: Connecting Media Literacy and the Common Core!
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