Poverty and Inequality
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The Chronic Poverty Report 2014-2015: The road to zero extreme poverty

The Chronic Poverty Report 2014-2015: The road to zero extreme poverty | Poverty and Inequality | Scoop.it
With the debate on the post-2015 development framework in full swing, the third international Chronic Poverty Report addresses one key question: what needs to be done to get to (or close to) zero extreme poverty by 2030 – the new goal for global poverty reduction? The report is the first produced by the Chronic Poverty Advisory Network (CPAN), the successor to the Chronic Poverty Research Centre (CPRC), which produced the first two Chronic Poverty Reports. Drawing on ten years of research by the CPRC and others, and on recent policy guides from CPAN, it presents new analysis of what it takes to sustain escapes from poverty; of countries that have succeeded in tackling chronic poverty; and new projections of poverty in 2030. It presents a tripartite challenge to the world: to get close to zero extreme poverty countries need to tackle chronic poverty, stop impoverishment and ensure that those who manage to escape from poverty sustain their escapes (the poverty ‘tripod’). It also raises the spectre that there may remain a billion people living in extreme poverty in 2030 unless existing policies are implemented robustly and new policies and political commitments are up and running by 2020. The bulk of the report focuses on the policies needed to get to zero. While there are many such policies, any country could and should be able to generate a selection of the key policies that will work with the national grain, and the report offers a device – the impoverishment index – to help countries determine the priorities that will carry their citizens out of poverty. Weblink: http://bit.ly/1i3NZTp
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What Can We Learn from Projecting Poverty for 2030? - Nobuo Yoshida

What Can We Learn from Projecting Poverty for 2030? - Nobuo Yoshida | Poverty and Inequality | Scoop.it
Since the World Bank Group (WBG) announced the goal of ending extreme poverty by 2030, Yoshida, poverty economist, has been projecting poverty numbers of some countries and regions for nearly two decades into the future. Forecasting versus Benchmarking, the answer was found in Ravallion (2012, 2013). In both papers Ravallion projected future poverty under the assumption that the developing world maintains its current pace of growth and poverty reduction. Although his methodology ensures that his projection predicts future poverty accurately if this assumption holds, it is still uncertain whether this assumption will hold and, consequently, whether his projection will prevail. http://bit.ly/Pov2030
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Inequality Post-2015: Focus on targets not goals? - ODI

Inequality Post-2015: Focus on targets not goals? - ODI | Poverty and Inequality | Scoop.it
There is a growing consensus that tackling the inequalities which hamper human progress should be part of a new set of sustainable development goals after 2015. A useful approach would be to focus on targets to incentivise and monitor action on specific inequalities.These could potentially include targets aimed at narrowing the gaps in income, health, education and other outcomes, and targets to open up political decision making. http://bit.ly/1j6nv5V
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ILO: Global Employment Trends 2014

ILO: Global Employment Trends 2014 | Poverty and Inequality | Scoop.it

According to the International Labour Organization’s annual publication on ‘global employment trends’, global unemployment increased by 5 million people in 2013. Around the world almost 202 million people were unemployed in 2013. Employment is not expanding sufficiently fast to keep up with the growing labour force. The bulk of the increase in global unemployment is in East and South Asia. The average length of unemployment spells has increased considerably, a further sign of feeble job creation. Vulnerable employment – that is, either self-employment or work by contributing family workers – accounts for almost 48 per cent of total employment. Informal employment remains widespread.  The number of working poor continues to decline globally, albeit at a slower rate than previously. Currently only small amounts of public spending go into active labour market measures. More active policies are needed.

 

Weblink: http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---dcomm/---publ/documents/publication/wcms_233953.pdf

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IMF Staff Discussion Note on: Redistribution, inequality, and growth

IMF Staff Discussion Note on: Redistribution, inequality, and growth | Poverty and Inequality | Scoop.it
The IMF on 'Redistribution, inequality and growth': Our main findings are: First, more unequal societies tend to redistribute more. It is thus important in understanding the growth-inequality relationship to distinguish between market and net inequality. Second, lower net inequality is robustly correlated with faster and more durable growth, for a given level of redistribution. These results are highly supportive of our earlier work. And third, redistribution appears generally benign in terms of its impact on growth; only in extreme cases is there some evidence that it may have direct negative effects on growth. Thus the combined direct and indirect effects of redistribution—including the growth effects of the resulting lower inequality—are on average pro-growth. While we should be cognizant of the inherent limitations of the data set and of cross-country regression analysis more generally, we should be careful not to assume that there is a big tradeoff between redistribution and growth. The best available macroeconomic data do not support that conclusion. http://bit.ly/1hWBbRn
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Worsening Wealth Gap Seen as Biggest Risk Facing the World in 2014 - WEF Report

Worsening Wealth Gap Seen as Biggest Risk Facing the World in 2014 - WEF Report | Poverty and Inequality | Scoop.it
The chronic gap between the incomes of the richest and poorest citizens is seen as the risk that is most likely to cause serious damage globally in the coming decade, according to over 700 global experts that contributed to the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks 2014 report. The report assesses 31 risks that are global in nature and have the potential to cause significant negative impact across entire countries and industries if they take place. The risks are grouped under five classifications – economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal and technological – and measured in terms of their likelihood and potential impact. http://bit.ly/WEF2014
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Humanity Divided: Confronting inequality in developing countries - UNDP

Humanity Divided: Confronting inequality in developing countries - UNDP | Poverty and Inequality | Scoop.it
Inequality in society is not a new phenomenon. And yet it can be fatal. If left unchecked, as demonstrated in this Report, it can undermine the very foundations of development and social and domestic peace.http://bit.ly/UNDPpovreduction
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Global Inequality

The relatively new field of inequality studies is gaining increasing momentum as economic disparity grows throughout the world, in advanced countries as well as less developed ones—especially in the United States. Speakers Joseph E. Stiglitz, professor of economics at Columbia University and the recipient of a John Bates Clark Medal and a Nobel Prize, James K. Galbraith, Professor of Government at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, and Branko Milanovic, Lead economist in the World Bank's research department, will address the progressive emergence of this new discipline: from its roots in classical economics, with its focus on the inequality of social classes (the functional distribution of income), to its shift, beginning in the early part of the twentieth, toward considering inequality among individuals. What sorts of data make it possible to measure inequality among citizens of a nation—and between citizens of different nations? Can we measure inequality between individuals of different nations as if they belonged to the same one? Does a polarization measure say anything about the structure of a society? How do we measure what happens between the extremes of the very rich and the very poor?


Via Aykut Kibritçioğlu, Jocelyn Stoller
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