Poverty Assignments by Noemi
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Rising food prices threaten to push over 60 million Asians back into poverty

Rising food prices threaten to push over 60 million Asians back into poverty | Poverty Assignments by Noemi | Scoop.it

The Asian Development Bank has warned that high food prices on the continent could push 64 million people in developing countries into extreme poverty, reports the AFP.


Via Jeff Makana
Noemi Arlante Intes's insight:

This is my final insight, using see-think and wonder thinking routine. Reading and seen the article about rising food prices is interconnected with my previous insight, it says about how the increasing food prices can lead the continent back to poverty, and to extreme cases even. I think, that this is unfair to the people still on the edge of poverty. Some people still has to pay bills for electricity, to send their children to school or send their family to the doctor. The article also has stated that it is linked to the extreme weathers throughout the world, so I wonder how this could be solved with a win-win situation, without any dispute or another big number falling into poverty again. 

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Lim Jun Heng's curator insight, February 1, 2013 8:25 AM

After finishing reading this article , I realized what a predicament we are in, the food prices is slowly losing , yet we can’t do anything about it . Soon the prices will rise so high that we can no longer afford, forcing us into extreme poverty? I think the best way to solve this is to stop the extreme weather , which is most likely caused by the global warming , thus I think we should stay green , and protect the earth . I wonder can the people be able to handle it. Being at the average income group to becoming poor to the extent that being unable to buy food?

Seamus Ong's curator insight, February 3, 2013 11:22 AM

This article makes me realise the current issue of increasing food prices that Asia is facing and how it poses a threat to the economy in the future as there isn't really a way to stop it from causing poverty. It makes me think about the future of Asia and how the cycle of poverty is doomed to repeat itself because of the increasing food prices. It makes me wonder if there actually was a way to get the poor out of this plight.

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Youth, Poverty and Mental Health

The mental health issues people experience cannot be considered separately from areas of development such as education, emergency response, employment, and human rights.

Via Jane Young
Noemi Arlante Intes's insight:

 

My insight using see-think-wonder method. What I have saw, and read about this article is in a sentence is that mental health, has a huge impact on their physical health and the same vice versa. There is also the mental health among children that also affects not only their health, but the access to education. What I think that this is horrible way to act towards the people who are suffering. Just so because they have depression, conduct disorder or any other kind of mental illness, they don’t deserve to be shunned out of health insurance. What I wonder about this article? Are the government or the people who are in higher statuses who have heard about this are going let this happen? Do they even appear to know? Why are they restricting people who have mental health? Are they even doing anything at all? 

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Mohamed Ridhwaan's curator insight, February 2, 2013 11:00 PM

This is my third insigth on Poverty, eloaborating more on Health. Prophet Muhammad once said that we should take advantage of 4 things in our lives: Wealth before Poverty, Good Health before Sickness, Youth Before Old and Free Time before we are Busy. For now, I will take more about the ' Good Helath before Sickness' point. Why is it considered a advantage? Something we should all think about. For example, imagine you are bed-ridden and you have Final-Year Examintion on that day itself. How would you do the important papers? If you were mentally and physically fit, you could have done the paper because of your perfect health condition. So in short, if we have good health, there is a possibility that we could do anything. 

Daryl Tan's curator insight, February 3, 2013 2:36 AM

From the article, we can conclude that poverty and the state of one's mental and physical health are closely linked. Without question, the majority of people who experience mental and psychosocial disabilities live in poverty. They also face unreasonable barriers related to finding work or attending school. Due to these factors, they are far more likely to experience other health issues and premature death in comparison with the general population. I like that the writer gives good suggestions on how to improve outcomes for people with mental and psychosocial disabilities, and strategies to enhance the mental health of these young people.

Merci Goh's curator insight, February 4, 2013 7:48 AM

Using the See Think Wonder routine. From This Acticle I can see that the majority of people who exprience mental and psychosocial disabilities live in poverty. They also experience poor physical health and are subjected to human rights violations as well. I think that people who have mental health are mostly due to the way they are treated by society as a whole. People who experience mental and psychosocial disabilities also experience restrictions to their abilities to access needed health and social care. The majority of people with mental health disabilities face unreasonable barriers related to finding work or attending school. Due to these factors, people with mental health disabilities are far more likely to experience other forms of disabilities as well and premature death in comparison with the general population. I wonder why do this people with Mental disabilities have to be treated differently from the others, they do not want to have this disabilities too. But yet people still make fun of them.


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A View From The Field: Addressing The Water-Energy-Poverty Nexus

A View From The Field: Addressing The Water-Energy-Poverty Nexus | Poverty Assignments by Noemi | Scoop.it
Much of today’s conversation addressing the increasingly important connection between water and energy is focused on solutions applicable to urban centers and developed nations.

Via Flora Moon
Noemi Arlante Intes's insight:

This is my insight, using see-think-wonder: From what I saw, what I have read, and learnt is that there are 1.2 millions of people living without electricity and another 8 million probably amongst the 1.2 million people does not live with sufficient intake of water. What I think, is that these people are pitiful, are so unprivileged, and I keep wondering what their lives are like, how they are living and how they are trying to cope when they are desperately trying to fulfill their needs, but they can’t. 

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Muhammad Kamil's comment, March 21, 2013 12:03 PM
this article tell people that, that more than 1.2 billion people in today’s world still live without access to electricity but nearly 800 million people don’t have access to a clean water source. Are the same people also struggling to survive without a regular supply of clean water? Unfortunately a lack of access to electricity and clean water is only a part of the problem. The combination of energy poverty, water poverty and economic poverty, for example – interconnected, holistic solutions need to be applied. combining solar-powered water purification systems.but all this education therefore we will need to teach the poor so that they will be able to use the item and maybe they will also be able to manufacture the items themselves so that the wont be reliant on people to supply tthem
Muhammad Kamil's curator insight, March 21, 2013 12:15 PM

this article tell people that, that more than 1.2 billion people in today’s world still live without access to electricity but nearly 800 million people don’t have access to a clean water source. Are the same people also struggling to survive without a regular supply of clean water? Unfortunately a lack of access to electricity and clean water is only a part of the problem. The combination of energy poverty, water poverty and economic poverty, for example – interconnected, holistic solutions need to be applied. combining solar-powered water purification systems.but all this education therefore we will need to teach the poor so that they will be able to use the item and maybe they will also be able to manufacture the items themselves so that the wont be reliant on people to supply tthem

Joel Lim's curator insight, January 20, 2014 11:35 AM

Before reading this article,i know that poverty means that u are struggling alot on making a living.But after reading this article,i was shocked to know that more than 1.2 billion people in today’s world still live without access to electricity and 800 million people don’t have access to a clean water source. and nearly two-thirds of people who lack safe drinking water live on less than $2 a day.how can 800 million people not have access to clean water source?water is essential for human to survive and without it,tons of life will be lost so i hope that people can give those children living in poverty a proper education as only with proper education can you have a brighter future and break free from poverty

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Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Through Education and Job Training

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Through Education and Job Training | Poverty Assignments by Noemi | Scoop.it
For too long, the national dialogue about college education has been focused on access and affordability.

Via britishroses
Noemi Arlante Intes's insight:

My insight using see-think-wonder. Reading about breaking through poverty through education sounds like an achievable goal, although that individual would have to face a lot of challenges; economic, social and with him or herself. I think that it’s difficult to find a job, moreover, a school that could offer education for a low pay. People need money, and they need a job. In order to have a job, one must have the right knowledge to do so and to have education, most times, we need money to have one. In the end, it’s all about money. I wonder that if people had to hire people from good backgrounds only, what chance could a poor person from a poor country can get? What else than having a good education can get them a job? And at what lengths do they have to go through just to get education?

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Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:35 AM

Education is the brightest hope for breaking the cycle of multi-generational poverty. But, kids born to poor, under-educated parents aren't likely to succeed at school without help that targets their family situations, and that help is most needed during their earliest years. Newborn was born poor, and nearly half of those babies went on to spend at least half of their childhood in poverty. Poor children were born into "deep poverty" to parents living on incomes less. Parents' low educational attainment was shown to predict persistent poverty for their children more consistently than any other factor the study investigated including single motherhood, family unemployment, young age of parents or living in inner-city neighborhoods. Earning a high school diploma can help break the cycle of multi-generational poverty, but persistent poverty makes earning that diploma a tough challenge. Children who spend more than half of their childhoods poor are more likely than never-poor children to enter their 20s without completing high school. Poverty strikes its most innocent victims hardest of all. Stresses associated with poverty including malnutrition, lack of mental stimulation, poor health care, frequent moving and general insecurity have their direst effect on newborns and children up to age two. Children who live in poverty in those first years of life are likely to complete high school than children who became poor later in childhood. I think what this report is saying is that early interventions are very important and targeting resources to these kids from birth is vital, because home environment in early years is so important to brain development. So when parents are stable, kids are stable.

 

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:00 AM

Education is important as we live in an era where you can only gain confidence in people and get a job when you have complete education. Many children who are poor, do not get a chance to go to school and learn. When given the chance, I am sure that most of them would wish to go to school and study. Many of these children work to earn money instead of studying as they cannot afford to pay for it. However, I believe that every child deserves a chance to be educated in a school, regardless of how rich or poor they are. Even though education is not something that can be totally free of charge, why not allow all children to go to school and learn the basics of the subjects, so that they would at least have enough knowledge to get a proper job.

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 11:31 AM

As highlighted in the article, we could achieve our goals by breaking the cycle of poverty by having a good and fundamental education through a college degree. Students from low income group with a college degree could contribute to society and become role models.The article mentioned that from an award winning program(SRA), graduants could easily seek employment embarking on  a career opportunity into the workforce.

In my opinion, a healthy society needs to nurture a good education program which in turn have good return through rewarding investment in education.

Rewarding careers and new emerging generation to tackle workforce issues, often kept me wondering how one day I would blend myselff into this.

 

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UK's food poverty revealed: nutrition falls as fruit and veg prices rise

UK's food poverty revealed: nutrition falls as fruit and veg prices rise | Poverty Assignments by Noemi | Scoop.it

Annual food survey shows that households are ditching fresh, healthy foods and 'trading down' to counter rising prices

The UK's poorest households are being disproportionately hit by the impact of soaring food prices, according to new government figures that also show the consumption of every major nutrient has fallen in the last four years.

In order to cut costs since 2007, UK households have bought less bread, lamb, beef, fish, fruit, vegetables, potatoes and alcoholic drinks – but more bacon.

The government's annual Family Food survey, which provides the most detailed annual snapshot of food and drink spending and consumption, found that weekly spending per person on all household food in 2011 was £27.99, an increase of 1.5% on the previous year. But because of price rises, that bought less food - 4.2% less in 2011 than in 2007.


Via @AngloCatalans
Noemi Arlante Intes's insight:

Poverty: Food

My insight, using see-think-wonder. I see and have read the statistics that have been stated in the news article, about food prices going up while intake of proper body nutritions have decreased among the people. I immediately think, from my perspective, that all the companies want is money, and would’ve have done anything to get it and that is what they do. The first thought that appeared in my mind was that the companies, planning to sell these foods to people. Do they have no regards for their health, or their economic situation?  If the country encourages their people to eat healthier meals, especially the poverty, the ones who would suffer more under the economic pressure, then they would have to decrease the prices of healthier meals. In the end, I would have to wonder why they are, in a way, encouraging people to eat unhealthy foods? Do they think that it’s not their responsibility that the others are poor? Is it their responsibility to help, support and feed the poor? 

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Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 8:39 AM

Some countries with poverty benefitted from a tropical climate with lush vegetation and a diverse range of crops that grow all year round. This highlights just how important agriculture is to reducing poverty in some countries. As those who have poverty will have the vegetation and crops that they got and they can eat without searching for any vegetation and crops desperately. So the lesser the vegetation and crops import from other countries, the higher the price it can be.  The country should be part of the biggest exporters of a variety of products, and a much larger proportion of peoples should reap the fruits of this trade. In general, whenever the country experiences periods of economic growth, they match improvements in agriculture. It provides tons of food, jobs, raw material for other sectors (e.g. cattle) and higher income. Even today as the service sector is taking off; agriculture remains an important aspect in the country’s economy. Several studies confirmed what was obvious to everyone: people with larger farm land, those with access to loans or production assets, as well as people closer to local markets all showed much lower poverty rates than the rest. Integrating thousands of households into local markets and teaching more advanced agricultural techniques are also essential aspects to reducing poverty in some countries. In many ways this implies more government intervention, at least to invest in basic infrastructure such as roads and cheap public transportation so that people are given the opportunity to go to town and sell their crops.

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:45 AM

Nutrients are important, especially important for children when they need the nutrients to grow. Without these nutrients, people might have deficiency diseases due to lack of nutrients or obesity due to consuming junk food and sugary drinks. I think that household markets should have an affordable prices for average household families to buy their essential daily needs. If the prices of the products are continuously increasing, I doubt that any of the families will be able to afford it and both the families and the supermarket will suffer. In my opinion, I think that the government should manage the rising prices of products in the supermarket, instead of helping out the families with financial difficulties as a larger number of people will benefit.

Jasmine Tan's curator insight, March 2, 2013 1:04 PM

See. Think. Wonder.

From this article, I can see that many people are starting to not consume or buy fruits and vegetables, because they are increasing in price and instead bought quite unhealthy food. I believe this is because if the lack of harvest, thus the markets are selling things at a higher price.

It makes me think of the other countires which have fuits and vegetables of the same pricing as usual, why do people still not want to buy them? They know that fruits and vegetables are healthy for them. This also brings back to the point where the lack of money does not let one eat well and healthily.

I wonder if the country can import more fuirts and vegetables from other countires so that they have more to sell, and that they would not have to increase the price of the things which they are selling.