Poverty Assignment_(your name)
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Rising food prices threaten to push over 60 million Asians back into poverty

Rising food prices threaten to push over 60 million Asians back into poverty | Poverty Assignment_(your name) | Scoop.it

The Asian Development Bank has warned that high food prices on the continent could push 64 million people in developing countries into extreme poverty, reports the AFP.


Via Jeff Makana
Seamus Ong's insight:

This article makes me realise the current issue of increasing food prices that Asia is facing and how it poses a threat to the economy in the future as there isn't really a way to stop it from causing poverty. It makes me think about the future of Asia and how the cycle of poverty is doomed to repeat itself because of the increasing food prices. It makes me wonder if there actually was a way to get the poor out of this plight.

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Noemi Arlante Intes's curator insight, February 1, 2013 5:00 AM

This is my final insight, using see-think and wonder thinking routine. Reading and seen the article about rising food prices is interconnected with my previous insight, it says about how the increasing food prices can lead the continent back to poverty, and to extreme cases even. I think, that this is unfair to the people still on the edge of poverty. Some people still has to pay bills for electricity, to send their children to school or send their family to the doctor. The article also has stated that it is linked to the extreme weathers throughout the world, so I wonder how this could be solved with a win-win situation, without any dispute or another big number falling into poverty again. 

Lim Jun Heng's curator insight, February 1, 2013 8:25 AM

After finishing reading this article , I realized what a predicament we are in, the food prices is slowly losing , yet we can’t do anything about it . Soon the prices will rise so high that we can no longer afford, forcing us into extreme poverty? I think the best way to solve this is to stop the extreme weather , which is most likely caused by the global warming , thus I think we should stay green , and protect the earth . I wonder can the people be able to handle it. Being at the average income group to becoming poor to the extent that being unable to buy food?

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» The Vicious Cycle of Poverty and Mental Health - World of Psychology

» The Vicious Cycle of Poverty and Mental Health - World of Psychology | Poverty Assignment_(your name) | Scoop.it
There is a vicious, self-reinforcing cycle of poverty associated with mental illness. You become poor. Sometimes through circumstances well beyond your control,

Via britishroses
Seamus Ong's insight:

From this article I can see that there are many who suffer from mental illnesses and health problems besides "the vicious cycle of poverty" and they are put through circumstances well "beyond their control" such as losing their job probably due to bad economy or perhaps due to a mental illness. I think that poverty, especially in this article, can relate to health and mental illness as the stress and lack of necessitiestaht comes with poverty can physically and mentally drain you of health. Although it makes me wonder, is there no jobs that will accept these poor people or why are they still poor when there are things like pension and CPF (in Singapore) to help them?

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Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:13 AM

People who live in poverty are at increased risk of mental illness compared to their economically stable peers. Their lives are stressful. They are both witness to and victims of more violence and trauma than those who are reasonably well off, and they are at high risk of poor general health and malnutrition. The converse is also true: When people are mentally ill, they are at increased risk of becoming and/or staying poor. They have higher health costs, difficulty getting and retaining jobs, are less productive at work, and suffer the social stigma and isolation of mental illness. There are different types of interventions undertaken in several low and middle-income places. The authors first looked at programs intended to improve individual or family economic status and monitored changes in measures of mental health including stress and depression in adults, childhood behavior problems, childhood cognitive development, and adolescent self-esteem.

 

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:53 AM

Poverty not only affects the person physically but also mentally as the person will feel more stress with the unknown future, whether they will live or die.  Since their fate cannot be controlled by them, they will have the insecurity and would be more prone to suffer from mental illness. I think that these people should at least be given a chance to earn some money. It is saddening when you see all those people living in poverty lying at the sides of the streets. However, do the people feel this way for them? 

Hilal Iryandy's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:06 AM

This article shows that poverty led to both mantal illnesses and diseases. They have suffer hunger and stress causing both diseases and emotional breakdowns.They lost their family, friends and belongings. I just wonder what can be done to make their lives happy.

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Five key lessons in the fight against poverty

Five key lessons in the fight against poverty | Poverty Assignment_(your name) | Scoop.it
Poor Economics brings to light some of the complexities of poor people's lives by exploring the difficult decisions they face, which are often about things we take for granted.  

 

Although we have no magic bullets to eradicate poverty, no one-shot cure-all, we do know a number of things about how to improve the lives of the poor. In particular, five key lessons emerge.

First, the poor often lack critical pieces of information and believe things that are not true. They are unsure about the benefits of immunising children; they think there is little value in what is learned during the first few years of education; they don’t know which is the easiest way to get infected with HIV. When their firmly held beliefs turn out to be incorrect, they end up making the wrong decision, sometimes with drastic consequences. Even when they know that they don’t know, the resulting uncertainty can be damaging.

Second, the poor bear responsibility for too many aspects of their lives. The richer you are, the more the “right” decisions are made for you. …


Via W. Robert de Jongh
Seamus Ong's insight:

In this article I can see quite a number of things that the author is talking about such as the poor not benefitting from the clean water provided from the government as they do not have access to it, the poor kids can't even get a proper education and thus lack the decision making which results in them making wrong decisions. In general, I think the author is trying to say that when you are poor, you lack health, basic necessities and education and other key skills or values that help you to survive and thrive in this society. The rich don't know how fortunate they are. However, this article makes me wonder why when the poor kids are given education, "they think there is little value in what is learned" and continue making the wrong decisions in life.

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Rescooped by Seamus Ong from Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions
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Poverty in Asia

Poverty in Asia | Poverty Assignment_(your name) | Scoop.it
Poverty in Asia on Japan, South Korea, China, India and Cambodia, and poverty in South Asia (World Poverty | Poverty in Asia: a look at causes and solutions http://t.co/NRpYp7K7)...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Seamus Ong's insight:

From this article, I can see that one of the main reasons leading to poverty in Asia is the lack of supply of basic needs for the people. There is also a large population growth on scarce resource an inadequate government. Land ownership is also a factor. I feel that because of current issues in the country that are not resolved, people are living in poverty and the vicious cycle becomes harder to break which is a pretty unfortunate thing. One thing that makes me wonder is: isn't the government doing something about this issue? It's about time they turn things around.

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Bunaiya Zuhairin's comment, January 28, 2014 10:38 PM
Wealth are not distributed widely well around the world. Poverty in Asia are also caused by rising population growth and population growth can't be controlled..Food supply, safe water and good education are not sufficient in these poor countries.
Casey Tan's comment, January 28, 2014 10:40 PM
I totally agree with kai yang
Casey Tan's comment, January 28, 2014 10:40 PM
I totally agree with kai yang
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Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Through Education and Job Training

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Through Education and Job Training | Poverty Assignment_(your name) | Scoop.it
For too long, the national dialogue about college education has been focused on access and affordability.

Via britishroses
Seamus Ong's insight:

In this article I can see that the article advocates having a good educatation and getting a college degree in order to earn a "meaningful employment" and be successful in society. However the article also says not every youth has the financial backing of his/her parents and a good solution would be to provide capable students with what they need to get a proper education (SRA).

I think that this is a pretty good way of adressing this issue as everyone will then have a chance at getting a college degree. I also feel that education is important and practical. everyone should have a chance to be educated an SRA has made a good contribution to the society. Something that I would wonder about the article is that if everything including getting a good education requires money, then wouldn't the rich always stay rich because they have lots of money for a quality education and the poor stay poor as they have not enough? Then there would be no way to break the cycle of poverty.

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Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:35 AM

Education is the brightest hope for breaking the cycle of multi-generational poverty. But, kids born to poor, under-educated parents aren't likely to succeed at school without help that targets their family situations, and that help is most needed during their earliest years. Newborn was born poor, and nearly half of those babies went on to spend at least half of their childhood in poverty. Poor children were born into "deep poverty" to parents living on incomes less. Parents' low educational attainment was shown to predict persistent poverty for their children more consistently than any other factor the study investigated including single motherhood, family unemployment, young age of parents or living in inner-city neighborhoods. Earning a high school diploma can help break the cycle of multi-generational poverty, but persistent poverty makes earning that diploma a tough challenge. Children who spend more than half of their childhoods poor are more likely than never-poor children to enter their 20s without completing high school. Poverty strikes its most innocent victims hardest of all. Stresses associated with poverty including malnutrition, lack of mental stimulation, poor health care, frequent moving and general insecurity have their direst effect on newborns and children up to age two. Children who live in poverty in those first years of life are likely to complete high school than children who became poor later in childhood. I think what this report is saying is that early interventions are very important and targeting resources to these kids from birth is vital, because home environment in early years is so important to brain development. So when parents are stable, kids are stable.

 

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:00 AM

Education is important as we live in an era where you can only gain confidence in people and get a job when you have complete education. Many children who are poor, do not get a chance to go to school and learn. When given the chance, I am sure that most of them would wish to go to school and study. Many of these children work to earn money instead of studying as they cannot afford to pay for it. However, I believe that every child deserves a chance to be educated in a school, regardless of how rich or poor they are. Even though education is not something that can be totally free of charge, why not allow all children to go to school and learn the basics of the subjects, so that they would at least have enough knowledge to get a proper job.

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 11:31 AM

As highlighted in the article, we could achieve our goals by breaking the cycle of poverty by having a good and fundamental education through a college degree. Students from low income group with a college degree could contribute to society and become role models.The article mentioned that from an award winning program(SRA), graduants could easily seek employment embarking on  a career opportunity into the workforce.

In my opinion, a healthy society needs to nurture a good education program which in turn have good return through rewarding investment in education.

Rewarding careers and new emerging generation to tackle workforce issues, often kept me wondering how one day I would blend myselff into this.