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Childhood poverty leaves its mark on adult genetics - health - 26 October 2011 - New Scientist

Childhood poverty leaves its mark on adult genetics - health - 26 October 2011 - New Scientist | Poverty assignment_Eugene Gan | Scoop.it
Genomes of adults raised in poor or rich households have distinctive patterns of epigenetic change – perhaps a response to early adversity (RT @JoelCarnazzo: Childhood poverty leaves its mark on adult genetics - New Scientist -

Via Jón Sallé, Tan Qi Shun
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Tan Qi Shun's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:38 AM

I do know that people living in a state of poverty most probably live a shorter life or more than often is down with severe dieseases.This article further elaborates on my point and it talks about how new-borns growing up in a poorer environment and state tend to end up in bad conditions. Tests and studies have shown that even when the genes are of similar qualities but when new borns live in a better and richer environment they tend to live longer and it is most probably because the parents are able to afford and seek medical treatments when in need of any. However the poor are unable to do anything about their illness, depriving them of a fighting chance. There is a large difference of the state of health between the rich and the poor, with the rich being able to handle health complications and the poor ending up helpless.After reading this article i feel very fortunate that every single Singaporean is blessed with the chance to meet their medical needs. I would like to challenge the point at which why the goverment of those various countries not implementing any programs to help the poor seek any medical attention. Do they not feel unfair for the poor when the rich is able to meet their while the poor is unable to? 

Teo J-lyn's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:43 PM

In this article, it shows that there is a rising number of people suffering from diseases such as cancer, herat diseases and many more. This could be cause by the impact of their childhood life because in the article, it state that people who are poorer are more prone to diseases. Tests, studies, experiments have shown that richer people can live longer as they have the money to go or treatment unike poorer people. It is unfair for them to be suffering like that and for some cases, this problems started when they are young, the disease might "follow' thrm until they grow old and it is unfair to them. If only the richer people will lend a helping hand to them and less people will be suffering and this will let the other know that they are not alone and everyone including the rich one is willing to help them.

Benjamin Yap Kian Hwee's comment, February 4, 2013 8:11 AM
After reading this article, I learnt that more people who are born in poor countries are suffering from diseases like heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other diseases. These diseases are often from their heredity or since childhood. They come from poor countries, hence the medical development are not advanced. Even if their medical development is advanced, they might not have enough money to pay for their medical bills. I find it very unfair that people who are rich can afford to get expensive medical treatment from private hospitals while the poor cannot even get the most basic treatments from clinics.
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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | Poverty assignment_Eugene Gan | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


Via Seth Dixon, Tan Qi Shun
Eugene Gan's insight:

Before reading this infographic, I already know that education is very important and it applies to those people living in te developing countries. Based on the infograhic, I can see the benefits and importance of education and how education change the lives of many and impact them for example, educated mothers are 50% more likely to immunize their children and three times less likely to contract HIV/AIDS. And one which helps reduce poverty stated from the infographic is that indivual earnings increases by 10% for each year of school completed. Hence, educated people will be able to take care of themselves even better since they know what is good for them and if the cycle of education goes on, in the future, most people in that developing country would be able to be educated enough to support themselves and their family and also able to break free from poverty.

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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

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Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Through Education and Job Training

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Through Education and Job Training | Poverty assignment_Eugene Gan | Scoop.it
For too long, the national dialogue about college education has been focused on access and affordability.

Via britishroses
Eugene Gan's insight:

I knew that living in the 21st Century, education is very important for our future; however, not many kids around the world receive proper education, even in the developed countries, because of their family’s financial state. And in order to get a good stable job, you must at least be a degree holder but, the expense of college is increasingly beyond the reach for millions of young Americans and their families. Thus because of this, not many graduate from college and may not know how to choose a career path, causing them not find a good job and in the end living in poverty. This situation leads to the cycle of poverty. It is important that a person gets a basic level of education so that they could get a job to support their family and give their children education. This led us to think whether we as a society should invest more in education.

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Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:35 AM

Education is the brightest hope for breaking the cycle of multi-generational poverty. But, kids born to poor, under-educated parents aren't likely to succeed at school without help that targets their family situations, and that help is most needed during their earliest years. Newborn was born poor, and nearly half of those babies went on to spend at least half of their childhood in poverty. Poor children were born into "deep poverty" to parents living on incomes less. Parents' low educational attainment was shown to predict persistent poverty for their children more consistently than any other factor the study investigated including single motherhood, family unemployment, young age of parents or living in inner-city neighborhoods. Earning a high school diploma can help break the cycle of multi-generational poverty, but persistent poverty makes earning that diploma a tough challenge. Children who spend more than half of their childhoods poor are more likely than never-poor children to enter their 20s without completing high school. Poverty strikes its most innocent victims hardest of all. Stresses associated with poverty including malnutrition, lack of mental stimulation, poor health care, frequent moving and general insecurity have their direst effect on newborns and children up to age two. Children who live in poverty in those first years of life are likely to complete high school than children who became poor later in childhood. I think what this report is saying is that early interventions are very important and targeting resources to these kids from birth is vital, because home environment in early years is so important to brain development. So when parents are stable, kids are stable.

 

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:00 AM

Education is important as we live in an era where you can only gain confidence in people and get a job when you have complete education. Many children who are poor, do not get a chance to go to school and learn. When given the chance, I am sure that most of them would wish to go to school and study. Many of these children work to earn money instead of studying as they cannot afford to pay for it. However, I believe that every child deserves a chance to be educated in a school, regardless of how rich or poor they are. Even though education is not something that can be totally free of charge, why not allow all children to go to school and learn the basics of the subjects, so that they would at least have enough knowledge to get a proper job.

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 11:31 AM

As highlighted in the article, we could achieve our goals by breaking the cycle of poverty by having a good and fundamental education through a college degree. Students from low income group with a college degree could contribute to society and become role models.The article mentioned that from an award winning program(SRA), graduants could easily seek employment embarking on  a career opportunity into the workforce.

In my opinion, a healthy society needs to nurture a good education program which in turn have good return through rewarding investment in education.

Rewarding careers and new emerging generation to tackle workforce issues, often kept me wondering how one day I would blend myselff into this.

 

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A View From The Field: Addressing The Water-Energy-Poverty Nexus

A View From The Field: Addressing The Water-Energy-Poverty Nexus | Poverty assignment_Eugene Gan | Scoop.it
Much of today’s conversation addressing the increasingly important connection between water and energy is focused on solutions applicable to urban centers and developed nations.

Via Flora Moon, Tan Kai Han
Eugene Gan's insight:

Before reading the article, I already know that there were people living in developing country who do not have access to clean drinking water. This article highlights and shows the statistic of the people over there having no access to both clean water and electricity, well known that more than 1.2 billion people in today’s world still live without access to electricity and nearly 800 million people do not have access to clean water. What’s worse is that nearly two-thirds of people who lack safe drinking water live on less than $2 a day. This article also states that people were sent to help built solar-powered water purification systems to pump and purify the local water source to help the people living there to have the access to clean water. This led me to wonder why the government of that developing country didn’t play a part to help the people to break free from the water-energy-poverty nexus.

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Muhammad Kamil's comment, March 21, 2013 12:03 PM
this article tell people that, that more than 1.2 billion people in today’s world still live without access to electricity but nearly 800 million people don’t have access to a clean water source. Are the same people also struggling to survive without a regular supply of clean water? Unfortunately a lack of access to electricity and clean water is only a part of the problem. The combination of energy poverty, water poverty and economic poverty, for example – interconnected, holistic solutions need to be applied. combining solar-powered water purification systems.but all this education therefore we will need to teach the poor so that they will be able to use the item and maybe they will also be able to manufacture the items themselves so that the wont be reliant on people to supply tthem
Muhammad Kamil's curator insight, March 21, 2013 12:15 PM

this article tell people that, that more than 1.2 billion people in today’s world still live without access to electricity but nearly 800 million people don’t have access to a clean water source. Are the same people also struggling to survive without a regular supply of clean water? Unfortunately a lack of access to electricity and clean water is only a part of the problem. The combination of energy poverty, water poverty and economic poverty, for example – interconnected, holistic solutions need to be applied. combining solar-powered water purification systems.but all this education therefore we will need to teach the poor so that they will be able to use the item and maybe they will also be able to manufacture the items themselves so that the wont be reliant on people to supply tthem

Joel Lim's curator insight, January 20, 2014 11:35 AM

Before reading this article,i know that poverty means that u are struggling alot on making a living.But after reading this article,i was shocked to know that more than 1.2 billion people in today’s world still live without access to electricity and 800 million people don’t have access to a clean water source. and nearly two-thirds of people who lack safe drinking water live on less than $2 a day.how can 800 million people not have access to clean water source?water is essential for human to survive and without it,tons of life will be lost so i hope that people can give those children living in poverty a proper education as only with proper education can you have a brighter future and break free from poverty

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UN calls for combining energy access with anti-poverty projects in Asia

UN calls for combining energy access with anti-poverty projects in Asia | Poverty assignment_Eugene Gan | Scoop.it
Services that combine access to modern energy for heating, cooking and electricity, with measures that generate cash, supplement incomes and improve health and education would be the most effective energy solutions in Asia and the Pacific,...

Via Flora Moon, Teo Jing Yi
Eugene Gan's insight:

Before reading this article, I already know that most people living in rural parts of Asia are facing poverty and unable to enjoy the privilege to be living in a technologically advanced environment like us. This article state that the UN Development Programme (UNDP) combining energy access with anti-poverty project for people over there to heating, cooking and electricity, supplement incomes and improve health and education, telling us UN trying to improve life and reduce the bad impacts on health and the environment . However, the energy services doesn’t help much with reducing poverty but instead transform people from being ‘poor without energy access’ to ‘poor with energy access”.  This led me to wonder why don’t the UNDP start from developing education over there since education is very important and help reduce poverty.

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Benjamin Yap Kian Hwee's comment, February 4, 2013 7:51 AM
After reading this article, I see that the people are not able to pay for electricity. The government is helping them by building solar panels to collect energy from the sun. This will benefit many people, for example the children can study even after the sunset and the adults can use electrical appliances to cook food instead of using fire. Now the people can use the computer and connect to the outside world and let people know about what is poverty.
Wong Jia Ler's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:08 AM

This method is viable, it will help many obtain cooked food, but. is this method viable in a way in cost effectiveness if we wanted to do this in a world wide scale to help everyone? I do not think so, but, it is still good as this project had helped many, thousands, or maybe millions. lives are saved, but maybe we could look for a new method to help them which is cost effective and needed by people affected by poverty.

Praveent Thamil Mani's curator insight, January 20, 2014 7:21 AM

Support offered by government and non-government agencies to people to come out of the poverty line.

 

I see that a report by the UN Development Programme confirms that there can be no development without energy, and that poverty cannot be addressed sustainably without paying due attention to energy services.  The poor need energy to get out of poverty, but energy alone is not enough. The poor need support to generate income so that energy becomes affordable, which in turn will improve household living standards. Nearly half the world’s population lacks reliable access to modern energy services. I hope that this process speeds up and the poverty in the world is decreased.