Poverty Assignment_Chua Hui Mei
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» The Vicious Cycle of Poverty and Mental Health - World of Psychology

» The Vicious Cycle of Poverty and Mental Health - World of Psychology | Poverty Assignment_Chua Hui Mei | Scoop.it
There is a vicious, self-reinforcing cycle of poverty associated with mental illness. You become poor. Sometimes through circumstances well beyond your control,

Via britishroses
May Chua's insight:

From this article, i learnt that many people are suffering from health problems due to poverty. The people are not just suffering from physical health, but also mentally. As they are suffering from having no money for their daily needs. I think that the society should help the people that are facing poverty and help them to stand back up on their feet instead of ignoring them. 

I wonder if there is no poverty in the world, how great would it be. 

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Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:13 AM

People who live in poverty are at increased risk of mental illness compared to their economically stable peers. Their lives are stressful. They are both witness to and victims of more violence and trauma than those who are reasonably well off, and they are at high risk of poor general health and malnutrition. The converse is also true: When people are mentally ill, they are at increased risk of becoming and/or staying poor. They have higher health costs, difficulty getting and retaining jobs, are less productive at work, and suffer the social stigma and isolation of mental illness. There are different types of interventions undertaken in several low and middle-income places. The authors first looked at programs intended to improve individual or family economic status and monitored changes in measures of mental health including stress and depression in adults, childhood behavior problems, childhood cognitive development, and adolescent self-esteem.

 

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:53 AM

Poverty not only affects the person physically but also mentally as the person will feel more stress with the unknown future, whether they will live or die.  Since their fate cannot be controlled by them, they will have the insecurity and would be more prone to suffer from mental illness. I think that these people should at least be given a chance to earn some money. It is saddening when you see all those people living in poverty lying at the sides of the streets. However, do the people feel this way for them? 

Hilal Iryandy's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:06 AM

This article shows that poverty led to both mantal illnesses and diseases. They have suffer hunger and stress causing both diseases and emotional breakdowns.They lost their family, friends and belongings. I just wonder what can be done to make their lives happy.

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Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Through Education and Job Training

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Through Education and Job Training | Poverty Assignment_Chua Hui Mei | Scoop.it
For too long, the national dialogue about college education has been focused on access and affordability.

Via britishroses
May Chua's insight:

In this fast paced and developed world that we are living in, having education is very important in order to survive in the society. Such as being able to secure a better job and earning more money. Many children around the world do not receive proper education due to the family's poor financial status. I think that the government should do something about children without education and give help to them.
I wonder how many people are suffering out there just because they could not afford proper education and thus leading them to having a hard life.

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Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:35 AM

Education is the brightest hope for breaking the cycle of multi-generational poverty. But, kids born to poor, under-educated parents aren't likely to succeed at school without help that targets their family situations, and that help is most needed during their earliest years. Newborn was born poor, and nearly half of those babies went on to spend at least half of their childhood in poverty. Poor children were born into "deep poverty" to parents living on incomes less. Parents' low educational attainment was shown to predict persistent poverty for their children more consistently than any other factor the study investigated including single motherhood, family unemployment, young age of parents or living in inner-city neighborhoods. Earning a high school diploma can help break the cycle of multi-generational poverty, but persistent poverty makes earning that diploma a tough challenge. Children who spend more than half of their childhoods poor are more likely than never-poor children to enter their 20s without completing high school. Poverty strikes its most innocent victims hardest of all. Stresses associated with poverty including malnutrition, lack of mental stimulation, poor health care, frequent moving and general insecurity have their direst effect on newborns and children up to age two. Children who live in poverty in those first years of life are likely to complete high school than children who became poor later in childhood. I think what this report is saying is that early interventions are very important and targeting resources to these kids from birth is vital, because home environment in early years is so important to brain development. So when parents are stable, kids are stable.

 

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:00 AM

Education is important as we live in an era where you can only gain confidence in people and get a job when you have complete education. Many children who are poor, do not get a chance to go to school and learn. When given the chance, I am sure that most of them would wish to go to school and study. Many of these children work to earn money instead of studying as they cannot afford to pay for it. However, I believe that every child deserves a chance to be educated in a school, regardless of how rich or poor they are. Even though education is not something that can be totally free of charge, why not allow all children to go to school and learn the basics of the subjects, so that they would at least have enough knowledge to get a proper job.

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 11:31 AM

As highlighted in the article, we could achieve our goals by breaking the cycle of poverty by having a good and fundamental education through a college degree. Students from low income group with a college degree could contribute to society and become role models.The article mentioned that from an award winning program(SRA), graduants could easily seek employment embarking on  a career opportunity into the workforce.

In my opinion, a healthy society needs to nurture a good education program which in turn have good return through rewarding investment in education.

Rewarding careers and new emerging generation to tackle workforce issues, often kept me wondering how one day I would blend myselff into this.

 

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Aghbalou: Water and Poverty in the Moroccan Desert | The Platform

Aghbalou: Water and Poverty in the Moroccan Desert | The Platform | Poverty Assignment_Chua Hui Mei | Scoop.it
The Platform / In Aghbalou: The Source of Water, Director Remigiusz Sowa explores the most unlikely and perilous of friendships, water and the desert (#CEP researcher John has been involved with production of Aghbalou: film about water &poverty...

Via emav
May Chua's insight:

This article talks about the people living in Todgha Valley having no access to water and in years to come, half of their crops will be gone and the temperature will increase as well. After reading the article, my heart goes out for the people living there. Water is such an important thing in life and yet the people there are suffering from shortage of water. In countries that are more developed, people are wasting their resources and not feeling guilty over it, and taking advantage of what good life they have. I pity the people living there that are deeply in need of water and have to dig deeper and deeper into the land for more water for their living needs and for their growing crops. I wonder how many people living there have been affected due to the lack of water.

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Poon Ying Ying's curator insight, February 4, 2013 8:22 AM

From this article we can see that the people are lack of water supply due to climate change, population growth and poverty. We all know the water is an essential tool in our lives for survival, without water we cannot live. There are many purposes of water, for drinking purposes, cooking, bathing, washing and growing crops. The people living in the Moroccan Desert have been sustaining water through an advanced medieval system of lengthy underground tunnels, known as khettara that channel groundwater to the plots. Now the system have been augmented by the rumbe of water pumps and black plastic webs of drip systems and problems rises. I wonder how the people living in the desert are going to survive without water supply to  quench their thirst and grow crops to feed their kids?

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:24 AM

I can see from the trailer of the video that the Moroccan Desert might no longer be able to cultivate crops for the people to eat. Water is scarce and from the pictures of the dried up ground, I can see that droughts often occur. With the increasing temperature all around the world with extreme weather patterns occurring, the land might soon be too dry to cultivate any further. This film about the relation of poverty and water allows viewers to understand the situation that these people are facing. By exploring this situation in details, I think that the director hopes to bring across the message that we should try our best to save as much water as possible. However, if the day when the land becomes unsuitable for planting, how will the people survive as water is essential to survive? Will they adapt new plantation method?

Jacob Ng's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:34 AM

From this article, we can clearly see that the Moroccan Desert has a lack of water due to various problems that they faced.Like for example the Khettaras , where there go to get their supply of water is slowly drying up due to problems like climate change, population growth and conflicts of rights etc.Water is an essential need in our daily lives, we need it for hydrating purposes and as well as planting crops.With all these problems cloggin up their essential needs in life, how are they gonna live on their everyday.Thus, despite all these hardship it hink that these people have a strong will in living on no matter what comes their way.

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Asian women workers risk "persistent vulnerability, poverty and exploitation"

Asian women workers risk "persistent vulnerability, poverty and exploitation" | Poverty Assignment_Chua Hui Mei | Scoop.it

BANGKOK (TrustLaw) – Women workers in Asia face the risk of “persistent vulnerability, poverty and exploitation” despite a recovering economy and their huge potential due to prejudice, according to a report by the International Labour Organisation and Asian Development Bank. A large majority of women here are stuck in lower-end, lower-pay jobs in vulnerable, informal and insecure sectors with little social protection and at the lowest rung of the global supply chain, it said. While progress has been made in past decades addressing gender inequalities, “discrimination against women remains pervasive throughout the labour markets of the region,” Women and labour markets in Asia: Rebalancing Gender Equality said. According to the report, the Asia Pacific region is losing $24 billion to $47 billion annually because of women’s limited access to employment opportunities and another $16 billion to $30 billion as a result of gender gaps in education.
Also listen to the following radio broadcast on Radio Australia
http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/connectasia/stories/201104/s3203663.htm


Via Cindy Sullivan
May Chua's insight:

In Asia there are many people that are being forced to work tough jobs and receiving low pays especially women. I felt unfair for the women that are facing discrimination from the society and i think that this old fashioned way of thinking should not exist anymore. Women and men should be treated equally and fairly. Just because they are women does not mean that they are less capable. I wonder why the society has changed to be so modernised but yet their thinking are still so old fashioned. 

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Tan Jun Wei's curator insight, February 3, 2013 1:28 PM

This is my insight using one of the thinking methods. As stated in the article, a large majority of women are stuck in lower-end, lower-pay jobs in vulenrable, informal and insecure sectors with little social protection. According to the report, the Asia Pacific region is losing $24 billion to $47 billion annually because of women's limited access to employment opportunites and another $16 billion to $30 billion as a result of gender gaps in education. I think that both males and females should be treated equally the same with the same job opportunites and also recieving proper education as both males and females ara humans too and therefore we need to have the same job opportunies and recieve proper education so that we can earn enough money for ourselves and family and also to help out with the growth of the country. I wonder if the government or any other organisations will help out by setting up campaigns to support the idea of both males and females to have equal rights.

Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:58 AM

Although the poverty gender gap is higher than any other developed country, the “feminization of poverty” is a global problem. This is not because women do less work. Quite the opposite: Women produce half of the world’s food and by some estimates work two-thirds of the world’s working hours. Women and men did different work based on the demands of childbearing and the community’s reproduction, but all people were valued for their contributions to the survival of their society. Women were held in the highest esteem. Once society separated into social classes, however, women were pushed into a subordinate role. Men dominated private property and its inheritances from generation to generation. Women became the property of their fathers and husbands in the same way that slaves were the property of their owners. Women, both enslaved and free, were largely without independent property and legal rights. Under feudalism, the product of their labours, both in the home and outside of it, was controlled by the men.

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:09 AM

This article depicts the inequality of the priviledges of the females and the males. The males are seen as superior, having a more stable job than the females, who were given a lesser paying job. However, gender discrimination is not something that can be easily passed off as both genders contribute an equal amount of hard work, except that they contribute to different categories in the industry, based on their strengths. I think that females should also be given a chance to have a proper job, especially females who have a family to support. There might be females that are able to do a better job than the males in that particular job. Will this kind of gender discrimination continue to affect the poverty of those families?

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Rising Food Prices Intensify Poverty, Hunger In U.S. And World

Rising Food Prices Intensify Poverty, Hunger In U.S. And World | Poverty Assignment_Chua Hui Mei | Scoop.it

"Global food prices continue to rise," begins a recent report by the World Bank. Between October 2010 and January 2011, the Bank's food price index increased by 15 percent, and the global prices of wheat, maize, sugar and edible oils have all increased sharply. (RT @Truth247: Rising Food Prices Intensify Poverty, Hunger In U.S. & World http://huff.to/dLurhu ||No COLA 4 SocSec 4 2 yrs. $250 payment blocked by GOP)


Via Jeff Makana
May Chua's insight:

From this article, i understand that the food prices are increasing and some of the essential food have even doubled in price. The reason behind the rising prices in food is due to bad harvesting and using essential food for chemicals. With food prices increasing, there will be more and more families facing poverty. I think that the government should not increase the prices in food because certain families with low income already have trouble affording for their basic needs thus if the food prices are high, they will suffer more. I wonder why the government is not taking any action when there is an increasing amount of families facing poverty and children that are lacking of nutrition. 

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Daryl Tan's curator insight, February 3, 2013 2:11 AM

With the food prices rising globally, more and more people in U.S and the rest of the world are having more difficulty putting food on the table. In 2007 and 2008, prices of many staple crops doubled in a year and millions went hungry. Between October 2010 and January 2011, there was another food price-spike.

Years ago, the food crisis used to be widespread only in poorer countries. However, this is not so now. As the food crisis looms ahead, I wonder if the world governments would be able to resolve this seemingly urgent situation?

Mohamed Hasir Marican's curator insight, February 3, 2013 5:26 AM

Before i read this article, i thought that only Asia and Africa are experiencing poverty. However, this article has showed me that even Americas face such issues. In this article it states that 16 percent of people in the Americas have gone hungry due to finances and rising food prices. If this trend of rising food prices continues, then more and more families will fall in to the category. It is going to be a great challenge for the government to solve this problem but they have to do something about it. I have learnt that we should never take things forgranted as we might not know when we are going to fell into the category.

Jasmine Tan's curator insight, March 2, 2013 12:21 PM

See. Think. Wonder.

From this article, I can see that poverty has actually reached most parts of the world, and that some countries are getting much more affected by it. As our natural resources are being used up consistently, food prices are uncontrollably increasing by much more than it should be.

It makes me think of how the other countries which are worse then the amount of people facing poverty in the U.S. are going to survive and overcome this problem. Does anyone actually help them? Or are they just pushed to one corner, left to die alone due to starvation? It makes me think of the fortunate people these days who do not appreciate what they have.

This article makes me wonder if the future generations would be abe to cope with the more drastic price increases in the future, where more of our natural resources are gone. t makes me wonder, how are the people who are originally poor, able to make sure they have enough money or food or survival needs to keep themselevs alive.