Poverty Assignment_Chan Kin Leong
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Rescooped by Chan Kin Leong from Welfare, Disability, Politics and People's Right's
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UK's first 'social supermarket' opens to help fight food poverty

UK's first 'social supermarket' opens to help fight food poverty | Poverty Assignment_Chan Kin Leong | Scoop.it
Community Shop in Goldthorpe gives local shoppers access to surplus food from supermarkets for up to 70% less

Via britishroses
Chan Kin Leong's insight:

After reading this article, I felt relieved and delighted about the "social supermarket" store that's about to be open. This relate me to a piece of news that I have heard; lots of singaporeans are constantly wasting food on their daily usage. In fact, Singapore threw away about 0.68 million tonnes of food waste in 2011 and only 10% was recycled. This means on average, each person in Singapore generated about 130kg of food waste a year. I felt shocked about how much food we have wasted. These amount of food definately can help those people who could not even afford to have 3 meals per day daily. I felt that we should treasure the food that we are given to eat instead of choosing what we want to eat. After reading, i have two questions in mind. "Can UK afford to open more shops like the social supermarket to help out the needy?" and "Why does Singapore not have any similar shops like this to help out those who are in need?"

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Rescooped by Chan Kin Leong from Welfare News Service (UK) - Newswire
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The Children's Society's Matthew Reed: Millions are facing a winter of misery - we need to fight child poverty

The Children's Society's Matthew Reed: Millions are facing a winter of misery - we need to fight child poverty | Poverty Assignment_Chan Kin Leong | Scoop.it
Matthew Reed, Chief Executive of The Children's Society, says that the choice between heating and eating is one no one should have to make

Via Steven Preece
Chan Kin Leong's insight:

After reading this article, I felt very flabbergasted as I did not know that people in the country had to decide on choosing either "heat" or "food". This article let me relate to a piece of news that I have heard; tourists coming from hot climate countries are travelling to cold countries to experience the winter, however they do not realised that winter would bring about such negative impacts on the people living at there. A huge number of people are turning their heating down as they can’t afford it and some people even own debts as they wanted to survive past the extreme cold. I wonder if the government in the country will think of any more efficient ways to help these people and I wonder how long more can the people in the country survive under such extreme circumstances.

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Sara Abdul's comment, January 28, 2014 10:54 PM
I agree with Bunaiya's insight .To the point that they could not afford using the heaters during winter season is really heart-breaking. The government should help them and give them money .
Sein's comment, January 29, 2014 3:22 AM
I think that able people and goverment should spent money and effort to help them to keep them warm.Goverment,communities , and the school should work together to support and help those student who are facing poverty so most in need will get help.
Jasmine Choo's comment, February 3, 2014 2:20 AM
I agree with Bunaiya. We all need food, warmth and water to survive. However, some people out there are not as lucky as we are. They need to make sacrifices just to provide. The government should do more to provide for these people. We should also learn to cherish and be satisfied with what we have.
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60% of South Africa's kids set to get a raw deal

60% of South Africa's kids set to get a raw deal | Poverty Assignment_Chan Kin Leong | Scoop.it

Pretoria - The impact of poverty on a child’s development is long-term, and at least 60 percent of South Africa’s 18.5 million children are poor and stand the risk of missing out on education, employment and health benefits throughout their lives. Children who grow up in poor households are likely to remain poor, said the 2012 Child Gauge, and this because there are generally no change in the pattern of relative deprivation over time.

Chan Kin Leong's insight:

After reading this article, I felt that the South African poverty kids are not being treated very fairly in their lives. They did not even have any single chance on studying just because they were under poverty circumstances. I believe that they would treasure any chances of being able to study as soon as they sees it. This somehow connects me to a piece of news that I have heard; people in other countries are taking studies for granted. They gave up on their studies as they felt that they do not have the right mood to study. They think that schools are always there for them and thus they think that they can afford to study at a later time as schools are always there for them. I felt that they should have the right attitude and mind concept towards learning by treasuring their time to study while they could. The time that they wasted unnecessarily could be spent on picking up new skills to improve their way of life. There are still some questions that have been bothering me. "What does the government and those wealthy people in the country do to help those children in poverty?" and “Can we do anything to help those children who are impoverished so that they can afford the school fees?"

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