Poverty Assignment by_ Tricia Chan Yan Ru
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Asian women workers risk "persistent vulnerability, poverty and exploitation"

Asian women workers risk "persistent vulnerability, poverty and exploitation" | Poverty Assignment by_ Tricia Chan Yan Ru | Scoop.it

BANGKOK (TrustLaw) – Women workers in Asia face the risk of “persistent vulnerability, poverty and exploitation” despite a recovering economy and their huge potential due to prejudice, according to a report by the International Labour Organisation and Asian Development Bank. A large majority of women here are stuck in lower-end, lower-pay jobs in vulnerable, informal and insecure sectors with little social protection and at the lowest rung of the global supply chain, it said. While progress has been made in past decades addressing gender inequalities, “discrimination against women remains pervasive throughout the labour markets of the region,” Women and labour markets in Asia: Rebalancing Gender Equality said. According to the report, the Asia Pacific region is losing $24 billion to $47 billion annually because of women’s limited access to employment opportunities and another $16 billion to $30 billion as a result of gender gaps in education.
Also listen to the following radio broadcast on Radio Australia
http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/connectasia/stories/201104/s3203663.htm


Via Cindy Sullivan
Tricia Chan's insight:

The way women are being discriminated in these countries are really disturbing.  In poverty affected areas, the way to survival is through growing crops and selling them in the market. It is indeed true that strength is needed for the labor work but I believe that women can also do the same too. It is very unfair when a woman’s pay is 70-90% lower than men and yet they are doing the same chores. A woman would also have to feed their family and at the same time take care of them; I believe that they should deserve more. I think that the people living in developing countries should change their perspectives on women and treat them fairly. At the same time, I also wonder if women were being treated equally, would the men feel unfair as by right, women are only supposed to take care of the household and not work. Would the men protest?

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Tan Jun Wei's curator insight, February 3, 2013 1:28 PM

This is my insight using one of the thinking methods. As stated in the article, a large majority of women are stuck in lower-end, lower-pay jobs in vulenrable, informal and insecure sectors with little social protection. According to the report, the Asia Pacific region is losing $24 billion to $47 billion annually because of women's limited access to employment opportunites and another $16 billion to $30 billion as a result of gender gaps in education. I think that both males and females should be treated equally the same with the same job opportunites and also recieving proper education as both males and females ara humans too and therefore we need to have the same job opportunies and recieve proper education so that we can earn enough money for ourselves and family and also to help out with the growth of the country. I wonder if the government or any other organisations will help out by setting up campaigns to support the idea of both males and females to have equal rights.

Eliza Koh JL's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:58 AM

Although the poverty gender gap is higher than any other developed country, the “feminization of poverty” is a global problem. This is not because women do less work. Quite the opposite: Women produce half of the world’s food and by some estimates work two-thirds of the world’s working hours. Women and men did different work based on the demands of childbearing and the community’s reproduction, but all people were valued for their contributions to the survival of their society. Women were held in the highest esteem. Once society separated into social classes, however, women were pushed into a subordinate role. Men dominated private property and its inheritances from generation to generation. Women became the property of their fathers and husbands in the same way that slaves were the property of their owners. Women, both enslaved and free, were largely without independent property and legal rights. Under feudalism, the product of their labours, both in the home and outside of it, was controlled by the men.

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:09 AM

This article depicts the inequality of the priviledges of the females and the males. The males are seen as superior, having a more stable job than the females, who were given a lesser paying job. However, gender discrimination is not something that can be easily passed off as both genders contribute an equal amount of hard work, except that they contribute to different categories in the industry, based on their strengths. I think that females should also be given a chance to have a proper job, especially females who have a family to support. There might be females that are able to do a better job than the males in that particular job. Will this kind of gender discrimination continue to affect the poverty of those families?

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Childhood poverty leaves its mark on adult genetics - health - 26 October 2011 - New Scientist

Childhood poverty leaves its mark on adult genetics - health - 26 October 2011 - New Scientist | Poverty Assignment by_ Tricia Chan Yan Ru | Scoop.it
Genomes of adults raised in poor or rich households have distinctive patterns of epigenetic change – perhaps a response to early adversity (RT @JoelCarnazzo: Childhood poverty leaves its mark on adult genetics - New Scientist -

Via Jón Sallé
Tricia Chan's insight:

The rising number of people suffering from diseases such as cancer and type 2 diabetes are usually from countries that are in poverty. In this article, it shows that these diseases are developed over time and it starts during childhood. When the children grow up and become adults, the symptoms would start to show, making them go through huge suffering. In my opinion, it would be a really painful experience especially when the advancement of medicine is lower than the developed countries. The people would not be able to get well and their days of living would shorten. Their children might also inherit the disease from their parents and the children would also have to suffer at a young age. It is not fair for the innocent children to go through such hardship especially when they have many years ahead of them. I wonder if the whole population would be wiped out due to these infectious diseases. I hope that there will be a cure for them.

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Tan Qi Shun's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:38 AM

I do know that people living in a state of poverty most probably live a shorter life or more than often is down with severe dieseases.This article further elaborates on my point and it talks about how new-borns growing up in a poorer environment and state tend to end up in bad conditions. Tests and studies have shown that even when the genes are of similar qualities but when new borns live in a better and richer environment they tend to live longer and it is most probably because the parents are able to afford and seek medical treatments when in need of any. However the poor are unable to do anything about their illness, depriving them of a fighting chance. There is a large difference of the state of health between the rich and the poor, with the rich being able to handle health complications and the poor ending up helpless.After reading this article i feel very fortunate that every single Singaporean is blessed with the chance to meet their medical needs. I would like to challenge the point at which why the goverment of those various countries not implementing any programs to help the poor seek any medical attention. Do they not feel unfair for the poor when the rich is able to meet their while the poor is unable to? 

Teo J-lyn's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:43 PM

In this article, it shows that there is a rising number of people suffering from diseases such as cancer, herat diseases and many more. This could be cause by the impact of their childhood life because in the article, it state that people who are poorer are more prone to diseases. Tests, studies, experiments have shown that richer people can live longer as they have the money to go or treatment unike poorer people. It is unfair for them to be suffering like that and for some cases, this problems started when they are young, the disease might "follow' thrm until they grow old and it is unfair to them. If only the richer people will lend a helping hand to them and less people will be suffering and this will let the other know that they are not alone and everyone including the rich one is willing to help them.

Benjamin Yap Kian Hwee's comment, February 4, 2013 8:11 AM
After reading this article, I learnt that more people who are born in poor countries are suffering from diseases like heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other diseases. These diseases are often from their heredity or since childhood. They come from poor countries, hence the medical development are not advanced. Even if their medical development is advanced, they might not have enough money to pay for their medical bills. I find it very unfair that people who are rich can afford to get expensive medical treatment from private hospitals while the poor cannot even get the most basic treatments from clinics.
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Aghbalou: Water and Poverty in the Moroccan Desert | The Platform

Aghbalou: Water and Poverty in the Moroccan Desert | The Platform | Poverty Assignment by_ Tricia Chan Yan Ru | Scoop.it
The Platform / In Aghbalou: The Source of Water, Director Remigiusz Sowa explores the most unlikely and perilous of friendships, water and the desert (#CEP researcher John has been involved with production of Aghbalou: film about water &poverty...

Via emav
Tricia Chan's insight:

Poverty has been a prevalent issue and water is indeed one of the factors that are affecting the people who are living in these areas. In this article, the people Todgha Valley, Morocco are suffering from water shortage and people have to travel to long distances in order to get drinking water. After I have read the scoop, I felt very sad for the people, they are not only lacking food but also the most essential key for survival. I really wonder what the people they would do if all the water in the water holes has been all dried up. Are they going to move to another place where water might be available?

 

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Poon Ying Ying's curator insight, February 4, 2013 8:22 AM

From this article we can see that the people are lack of water supply due to climate change, population growth and poverty. We all know the water is an essential tool in our lives for survival, without water we cannot live. There are many purposes of water, for drinking purposes, cooking, bathing, washing and growing crops. The people living in the Moroccan Desert have been sustaining water through an advanced medieval system of lengthy underground tunnels, known as khettara that channel groundwater to the plots. Now the system have been augmented by the rumbe of water pumps and black plastic webs of drip systems and problems rises. I wonder how the people living in the desert are going to survive without water supply to  quench their thirst and grow crops to feed their kids?

Iris Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:24 AM

I can see from the trailer of the video that the Moroccan Desert might no longer be able to cultivate crops for the people to eat. Water is scarce and from the pictures of the dried up ground, I can see that droughts often occur. With the increasing temperature all around the world with extreme weather patterns occurring, the land might soon be too dry to cultivate any further. This film about the relation of poverty and water allows viewers to understand the situation that these people are facing. By exploring this situation in details, I think that the director hopes to bring across the message that we should try our best to save as much water as possible. However, if the day when the land becomes unsuitable for planting, how will the people survive as water is essential to survive? Will they adapt new plantation method?

Jacob Ng's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:34 AM

From this article, we can clearly see that the Moroccan Desert has a lack of water due to various problems that they faced.Like for example the Khettaras , where there go to get their supply of water is slowly drying up due to problems like climate change, population growth and conflicts of rights etc.Water is an essential need in our daily lives, we need it for hydrating purposes and as well as planting crops.With all these problems cloggin up their essential needs in life, how are they gonna live on their everyday.Thus, despite all these hardship it hink that these people have a strong will in living on no matter what comes their way.

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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | Poverty Assignment by_ Tricia Chan Yan Ru | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


Via Seth Dixon
Tricia Chan's insight:

This infographic is very interesting as it finally shows that there is finally a way out for the people in poverty. I feel very happy for them as they finally do not need to struggle for their life like how their parents did.  When the child gets education they would grow up and perhaps get a job in the city area to make sure that they have an income.  Although their education level might not be very high, they would at least be able to survive and they would not have to be in hunger. When they have children, they would be able to pass on their knowledge and then the children would also be educated. The cycle continues and on long term, it would help many people get out of people. I think it is a very good idea using education as one of the factors as it is killing two birds with a stone. It is not only helping the future getting out of poverty but also giving the adults more knowledge about the issues. However, the number of people who manage to do this is very little, I wonder how many of them would be successful in the future. 

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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

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Government Ministers are in Denial About Food Poverty

Government Ministers are in Denial About Food Poverty | Poverty Assignment by_ Tricia Chan Yan Ru | Scoop.it
I talked to a constituent who had a stroke and is on benefit. After paying all his bills, he's left with just £12 a week - less than £2 a day - to spend on food.

Via britishroses
Tricia Chan's insight:

Apart from water being essential for the human survival, food is equally important. In many countries, food has been lacking for the unemployed and an example is America. The concept of the text is telling me how oblivious the government is about this issue. During the festive season, the rich would be able to afford what they want to have but the others had to rely on charity organizations just to feed the family, not even getting gifts for their loved ones. This shown how cruel society has become, where they are all self-centered, not sparing a thought for the poor. The organizations are doing their best to alleviate the situation but they would run out of food if they continue to feed the people. I would like to challenge the richer people to see if they would make the right choice to help the poor or continue to be a denial about this issue.

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Tricia Chng's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:48 PM

It is sad to hear that that low income families have to rely on foodbanks  during seasons like Christmas distributed by charity. If it is not for the help of the charity, they will need to eat less as they cannot afford for more food. I think that the government is not responsible as they denies that the problem have nothing to do with them. Not only they shrink the responsible to others, they even came out with more proposals like squeezing the incomes of low-paid working families, the sick, disabled and unemployed.

Cynthia Chia's curator insight, February 1, 2013 8:20 AM

We need food for survival. That is how important food is. While many are busy heavily feasting on Christmas and New Year's snacks, there are still thousands of people who simply cannot afford to eat. I have never heard of the term "foodbank" till today. Neither did I know that so many people rely on those banks for food or that those foodbanks are mainly run by charities. It bothers me how unmindful the government is towards food poverty, pushing the blame to supermarkets for the rising prices of food, when charities are trying their best to ease the food poverty situation with money out of their own pocket. This goes to show how self-centered people are nowadays. To care only about what happens to you and not others. The reality of the government policies and food poverty situation is just appaling. I wonder how much longer can the government deny this food poverty issue. It worries me, how this country would survive when such an irresponsible government is leading it. Aside that, I applaud all those volunteers for being humane people are doing the right thing. 

Shameerza's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:35 AM

Using see-think-wonder, i can see from what i've read from the article, the goverment isnt doing a good job in feeding their nations needs. It's sad to see that the poor families have to rely on foodbanks for food cause they can't afford to buy. Its also sad to hear that they have to depend on foodbanks during Christmas and yet they give these people little food, it's suppose to be festive and giving isn't it? It's really sad to think that the families have to eat less to equally distrubute among themselves. I think that the government should be more giving and not selfish. I wonder why can't the government give more food to these poor families, especially those with bigger families.