Poverty Assignment By_May22
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The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education

The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education | Poverty Assignment By_May22 | Scoop.it

The authors ask, "So why do presumably well-intentioned policy makers ignore, or deny, the correlations of family background and student achievement?"

 

Helen F. Ladd is a professor of public policy and economics at Duke. Edward B. Fiske, a former education editor of The New York Times, is the author of the “Fiske Guide to Colleges.”


Via Terry Calhoun, May
May's insight:

From this article, I learnt that students from disadvantaged households perform less well in school, on average, than their peers from more advantaged backgrounds. I had no knowledge of that before reading this. I thought that doing well or not depends on you and whether you study well. But then your lifestyle will surely affects on your studies as in your study environment can affect you when you study. I had actually thought of this possibility before, that one cannot study well in a good environment if one’s house is always full of worry over making both ends meet and concerning over how to survive the next day and your parents are always in a bad mood, how can you still study in this situation and do well in school?

more...
Karena Kwong's curator insight, January 19, 2014 8:25 AM

I did not know about the huge impact poverty can cause in a child's education. Before reading this article, I always believed that education is capable of bringing one out of poverty. I guess I was wrong. Education have the power to bring one out of poverty, but can also cause a child to not perform well in class due to the mental and emotional impact caused by poverty. The research and reports in this article further make me realise that there are negative consequences when a child suffering in poverty receives education. I thought of ideas for example to give counseling or motivational talks to children suffering in poverty, so that it can inspire them to think of life in a whole new perspective. Also, there could be additional support given by teachers (one to one teaching) so that the children can perform better despite their family background. The main objective is so that they can overcome their emotional and metal barrier. The challenges I faced is whether the help given by teachers or counselors are sufficient or whether a change is needed to improve on the education system (especially in America) so that every child has the same expectation and achievement they are to meet.

May's curator insight, January 20, 2014 8:10 AM

From this article, I learnt that students from disadvantaged households perform less well in school, on average, than their peers from more advantaged backgrounds. I had no knowledge of that before reading this. I thought that doing well or not depends on you and whether you study well. But then your lifestyle will surely affects on your studies as in your study environment can affect you when you study. I had actually thought of this possibility before, that one cannot study well in a good environment if one’s house is always full of worry over making both ends meet and concerning over how to survive the next day and your parents are always in a bad mood, how can you still study in this situation and do well in school?

Zhiyang Liang's comment, January 28, 2014 10:42 AM
This article confirms what I thought before with a series of scientific data. May, I believe with your point the lifestyle of students from disadvantaged households is quite mess and will surely affect their studies. Although a poor child is aided financially by a charity to school, it is still quite hard for him to catch up. They actually have to spend a lot of time helping their families instead of study. And also their families are not have extra money for them to study at their early age and thus their foundations may be weaker than other students. And these will probably decrease their self-esteem and make them lack of interest in studies resulting in performing bad at school. If we want to give hands to those poor children, is not just to help them pay schools. How to help the poor effectively is a great learning which still needs people to find and explore.
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It Is Expensive to Be Poor

It Is Expensive to Be Poor | Poverty Assignment By_May22 | Scoop.it
Minimum-wage jobs are physically demanding, have unpredictable schedules, and pay so meagerly that workers can't save up enough to move on. ("Poverty is not a character failing or a lack of motivation.
May's insight:

Why was Johnson’s War on Poverty never successful? He fought for “better schools, and better health, and better homes, and better training, and better job opportunities” for those who were most in need. It seemed to be going well but what happened? There was never enough money for the fight against poverty. No matter how much he might have wanted to help the poor, there were many of them and only him. While the rich were getting richer, the poor were getting poorer. They still are to these days. And then there was also the intense backlash from conservative intellectuals and politicians who didn’t felt the need to help the poor and thought that poverty is caused not by low wages or a lack of jobs and education, but by the bad attitudes and faulty lifestyles of the poor, when in fact, poverty is a shortage of money. And even if the government were to organise a War on Poverty to help people come out of poverty line, on the other hand, it also has the minimum wage jobs to be paid so meagrely that workers can't save up enough to move on. They pay so little that you cannot accumulate even a couple of hundred dollars to help you make the transition to a better-paying job. And who are the workers ? Those who are disadvantaged and deprived. Those who are uneducated or with low qualifications who could only apply minimum wage jobs to earn a living. But they are not earning at all. They barely survive. So the government is causing their own failure for the fight against poverty because their help towards the poor, it’s never ending as they are also the ones who have the minimum wage jobs to be lowly paid. So when will this cycle of poverty end? Can we ever successfully fight against poverty?

more...
May's curator insight, January 20, 2014 7:52 AM

Why was Johnson’s War on Poverty never successful? He fought for “better schools, and better health, and better homes, and better training, and better job opportunities” for those who were most in need. It seemed to be going well but what happened? There was never enough money for the fight against poverty. No matter how much he might have wanted to help the poor, there were many of them and only him. While the rich were getting richer, the poor were getting poorer. They still are to these days. And then there was also the intense backlash from conservative intellectuals and politicians who didn’t felt the need to help the poor and thought that poverty is caused not by low wages or a lack of jobs and education, but by the bad attitudes and faulty lifestyles of the poor, when in fact, poverty is a shortage of money. And even if the government were to organise a War on Poverty to help people come out of poverty line, on the other hand, it also has the minimum wage jobs to be paid so meagrely that workers can't save up enough to move on. They pay so little that you cannot accumulate even a couple of hundred dollars to help you make the transition to a better-paying job. And who are the workers ? Those who are disadvantaged and deprived. Those who are uneducated or with low qualifications who could only apply minimum wage jobs to earn a living. But they are not earning at all. They barely survive. So the government is causing their own failure for the fight against poverty because their help towards the poor, it’s never ending as they are also the ones who have the minimum wage jobs to be lowly paid. So when will this cycle of poverty end? Can we ever successfully fight against poverty?

Eve's comment, January 27, 2014 8:27 PM
its impossible to successfully fight against poverty, this cycle poverty will never end. Like what you said, there was never enough money for the fight against poverty. Even there is enough money to help 100 people for now, but will there be enough money to sustain them for the rest of their lives? Let alone for the ability of helping the rest of them. i agree with you that the government is actually causing their own failure.
Zhiyang Liang's comment, January 28, 2014 8:46 AM
I am totally agree with you, but I want to add something more about your comment. Why there are so many poor people in the world and why the number of the poor growths increasingly every year? Everything becomes expensive is definitely one of reasons but there are still many other reasons. In my perspective, not all poor people are poor when they first come to this world, it is just that this world such a society makes them poor and creates underprivileged people. There are plenty of occupations in our society, but most of people can only get those low-paying jobs. Living in such a competitive society is a hard task to find a well-paid job even though you are educated, hardworking, and ambitious. Although you are excellent enough,you may still be poor and good chances will still not befall on you as many corners of our society are chocked with corruption, bribe-taking and human relationships. Now the problem is everyone knows it's an issue, but no one is talking about it. I know is quite tough to solve these problems and eradicate such phenomenon. But at least the government should try their best to ban these kind of situations. I think it is also a solution to reduce the number of poor people.
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In Appalachia, Poverty Is In The Eye Of The Beholder

In Appalachia, Poverty Is In The Eye Of The Beholder | Poverty Assignment By_May22 | Scoop.it
In eastern Kentucky, residents are tired of serving as the poster children of the War on Poverty.
May's insight:

This article served as an eye-opener to me for many aspects and I got to know so many things that I didn’t know in the past by reading it. "... Poverty is in the eye of the beholder" says the title of the article. How true it is. Maybe for those who are well-off, you'll think straightaway that others with bad conditions of living are in poverty because that's how you see from your perspective. You choose to see the uneducated kids struggling among the jobless, drug-addicted adults and trailer homes. You tend not to see that there ARE well-paved roads, cheerful schools and beautiful mountains and that your analysis of one being in poverty is one-sided because in the eyes of those people who are in so-called "poverty", they may not see what you see. To them, they are rich in things that aren't included in any official measure of poverty. Things like family and faith. They appreciate what little they have. Those little things you overlook. They don’t keep reminding themselves of what they don’t have and live their lives miserably. That is, until the media and news reporters come in and start this whole thing of pinpointing them as 'living in poverty' and anytime somebody wanted to do a story about poor people they were the first stop. In the article, it is said that 'outside perception can hurt the self-esteem of the people who live in Appalachia.' This is the truth sadly. The stigma that "outsiders" label on these people is "poverty" to them, not their way of life. They maybe tired of being always depicted as poor and uneducated... and the article says it all, "when you portray us, please don't portray us as ignorant hill folk, I guess because we are educated. We're poor, but we're educated, and everyone's pretty proud. It's not a desolate place where no hope can be found." In conclusion, raising public-awareness is good for the overall if you want to help the poor, but we also need to be more sensitive towards others' lifestyles because words hurt more than you could know.

more...
May's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:44 AM

This article served as an eye-opener to me for many aspects and I got to know so many things that I didn’t know in the past by reading it. "... Poverty is in the eye of the beholder" says the title of the article. How true it is. Maybe for those who are well-off, you'll think straightaway that others with bad conditions of living are in poverty because that's how you see from your perspective. You choose to see the uneducated kids struggling among the jobless, drug-addicted adults and trailer homes. You tend not to see that there ARE well-paved roads, cheerful schools and beautiful mountains and that your analysis of one being in poverty is one-sided because in the eyes of those people who are in so-called "poverty", they may not see what you see. To them, they are rich in things that aren't included in any official measure of poverty. Things like family and faith. They appreciate what little they have. Those little things you overlook. They don’t keep reminding themselves of what they don’t have and live their lives miserably. That is, until the media and news reporters come in and start this whole thing of pinpointing them as 'living in poverty' and anytime somebody wanted to do a story about poor people they were the first stop. In the article, it is said that 'outside perception can hurt the self-esteem of the people who live in Appalachia.' This is the truth sadly. The stigma that "outsiders" label on these people is "poverty" to them, not their way of life. They maybe tired of being always depicted as poor and uneducated... and the article says it all, "when you portray us, please don't portray us as ignorant hill folk, I guess because we are educated. We're poor, but we're educated, and everyone's pretty proud. It's not a desolate place where no hope can be found." In conclusion, raising public-awareness is good for the overall if you want to help the poor, but we also need to be more sensitive towards others' lifestyles because words hurt more than you could know.

Lynn Keok's comment, January 27, 2014 8:43 PM
I agree. Our point of view of the supposedly poor people may not be their point of view on themselves. Their standard of life may be very different from ours, but that does not mean they are not contented. By calling them poor to the face is really an insult and like May said, hurt their self-esteem. I feel that we should only interfere when the people are really in a desperate situation.
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The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education

The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education | Poverty Assignment By_May22 | Scoop.it

The authors ask, "So why do presumably well-intentioned policy makers ignore, or deny, the correlations of family background and student achievement?"

 

Helen F. Ladd is a professor of public policy and economics at Duke. Edward B. Fiske, a former education editor of The New York Times, is the author of the “Fiske Guide to Colleges.”


Via Terry Calhoun
May's insight:

From this article, I learnt that students from disadvantaged households perform less well in school, on average, than their peers from more advantaged backgrounds. I had no knowledge of that before reading this. I thought that doing well or not depends on you and whether you study well. But then your lifestyle will surely affects on your studies as in your study environment can affect you when you study. I had actually thought of this possibility before, that one cannot study well in a good environment if one’s house is always full of worry over making both ends meet and concerning over how to survive the next day and your parents are always in a bad mood, how can you still study in this situation and do well in school?

more...
Karena Kwong's curator insight, January 19, 2014 8:25 AM

I did not know about the huge impact poverty can cause in a child's education. Before reading this article, I always believed that education is capable of bringing one out of poverty. I guess I was wrong. Education have the power to bring one out of poverty, but can also cause a child to not perform well in class due to the mental and emotional impact caused by poverty. The research and reports in this article further make me realise that there are negative consequences when a child suffering in poverty receives education. I thought of ideas for example to give counseling or motivational talks to children suffering in poverty, so that it can inspire them to think of life in a whole new perspective. Also, there could be additional support given by teachers (one to one teaching) so that the children can perform better despite their family background. The main objective is so that they can overcome their emotional and metal barrier. The challenges I faced is whether the help given by teachers or counselors are sufficient or whether a change is needed to improve on the education system (especially in America) so that every child has the same expectation and achievement they are to meet.

May's curator insight, January 20, 2014 8:10 AM

From this article, I learnt that students from disadvantaged households perform less well in school, on average, than their peers from more advantaged backgrounds. I had no knowledge of that before reading this. I thought that doing well or not depends on you and whether you study well. But then your lifestyle will surely affects on your studies as in your study environment can affect you when you study. I had actually thought of this possibility before, that one cannot study well in a good environment if one’s house is always full of worry over making both ends meet and concerning over how to survive the next day and your parents are always in a bad mood, how can you still study in this situation and do well in school?

Zhiyang Liang's comment, January 28, 2014 10:42 AM
This article confirms what I thought before with a series of scientific data. May, I believe with your point the lifestyle of students from disadvantaged households is quite mess and will surely affect their studies. Although a poor child is aided financially by a charity to school, it is still quite hard for him to catch up. They actually have to spend a lot of time helping their families instead of study. And also their families are not have extra money for them to study at their early age and thus their foundations may be weaker than other students. And these will probably decrease their self-esteem and make them lack of interest in studies resulting in performing bad at school. If we want to give hands to those poor children, is not just to help them pay schools. How to help the poor effectively is a great learning which still needs people to find and explore.
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It Is Expensive to Be Poor

It Is Expensive to Be Poor | Poverty Assignment By_May22 | Scoop.it
Minimum-wage jobs are physically demanding, have unpredictable schedules, and pay so meagerly that workers can't save up enough to move on. ("Poverty is not a character failing or a lack of motivation.
May's insight:

Why was Johnson’s War on Poverty never successful? He fought for “better schools, and better health, and better homes, and better training, and better job opportunities” for those who were most in need. It seemed to be going well but what happened? There was never enough money for the fight against poverty. No matter how much he might have wanted to help the poor, there were many of them and only him. While the rich were getting richer, the poor were getting poorer. They still are to these days. And then there was also the intense backlash from conservative intellectuals and politicians who didn’t felt the need to help the poor and thought that poverty is caused not by low wages or a lack of jobs and education, but by the bad attitudes and faulty lifestyles of the poor, when in fact, poverty is a shortage of money. And even if the government were to organise a War on Poverty to help people come out of poverty line, on the other hand, it also has the minimum wage jobs to be paid so meagrely that workers can't save up enough to move on. They pay so little that you cannot accumulate even a couple of hundred dollars to help you make the transition to a better-paying job. And who are the workers ? Those who are disadvantaged and deprived. Those who are uneducated or with low qualifications who could only apply minimum wage jobs to earn a living. But they are not earning at all. They barely survive. So the government is causing their own failure for the fight against poverty because their help towards the poor, it’s never ending as they are also the ones who have the minimum wage jobs to be lowly paid. So when will this cycle of poverty end? Can we ever successfully fight against poverty?

more...
May's curator insight, January 20, 2014 7:52 AM

Why was Johnson’s War on Poverty never successful? He fought for “better schools, and better health, and better homes, and better training, and better job opportunities” for those who were most in need. It seemed to be going well but what happened? There was never enough money for the fight against poverty. No matter how much he might have wanted to help the poor, there were many of them and only him. While the rich were getting richer, the poor were getting poorer. They still are to these days. And then there was also the intense backlash from conservative intellectuals and politicians who didn’t felt the need to help the poor and thought that poverty is caused not by low wages or a lack of jobs and education, but by the bad attitudes and faulty lifestyles of the poor, when in fact, poverty is a shortage of money. And even if the government were to organise a War on Poverty to help people come out of poverty line, on the other hand, it also has the minimum wage jobs to be paid so meagrely that workers can't save up enough to move on. They pay so little that you cannot accumulate even a couple of hundred dollars to help you make the transition to a better-paying job. And who are the workers ? Those who are disadvantaged and deprived. Those who are uneducated or with low qualifications who could only apply minimum wage jobs to earn a living. But they are not earning at all. They barely survive. So the government is causing their own failure for the fight against poverty because their help towards the poor, it’s never ending as they are also the ones who have the minimum wage jobs to be lowly paid. So when will this cycle of poverty end? Can we ever successfully fight against poverty?

Eve's comment, January 27, 2014 8:27 PM
its impossible to successfully fight against poverty, this cycle poverty will never end. Like what you said, there was never enough money for the fight against poverty. Even there is enough money to help 100 people for now, but will there be enough money to sustain them for the rest of their lives? Let alone for the ability of helping the rest of them. i agree with you that the government is actually causing their own failure.
Zhiyang Liang's comment, January 28, 2014 8:46 AM
I am totally agree with you, but I want to add something more about your comment. Why there are so many poor people in the world and why the number of the poor growths increasingly every year? Everything becomes expensive is definitely one of reasons but there are still many other reasons. In my perspective, not all poor people are poor when they first come to this world, it is just that this world such a society makes them poor and creates underprivileged people. There are plenty of occupations in our society, but most of people can only get those low-paying jobs. Living in such a competitive society is a hard task to find a well-paid job even though you are educated, hardworking, and ambitious. Although you are excellent enough,you may still be poor and good chances will still not befall on you as many corners of our society are chocked with corruption, bribe-taking and human relationships. Now the problem is everyone knows it's an issue, but no one is talking about it. I know is quite tough to solve these problems and eradicate such phenomenon. But at least the government should try their best to ban these kind of situations. I think it is also a solution to reduce the number of poor people.
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In Appalachia, Poverty Is In The Eye Of The Beholder

In Appalachia, Poverty Is In The Eye Of The Beholder | Poverty Assignment By_May22 | Scoop.it
In eastern Kentucky, residents are tired of serving as the poster children of the War on Poverty.
May's insight:

This article served as an eye-opener to me for many aspects and I got to know so many things that I didn’t know in the past by reading it. "... Poverty is in the eye of the beholder" says the title of the article. How true it is. Maybe for those who are well-off, you'll think straightaway that others with bad conditions of living are in poverty because that's how you see from your perspective. You choose to see the uneducated kids struggling among the jobless, drug-addicted adults and trailer homes. You tend not to see that there ARE well-paved roads, cheerful schools and beautiful mountains and that your analysis of one being in poverty is one-sided because in the eyes of those people who are in so-called "poverty", they may not see what you see. To them, they are rich in things that aren't included in any official measure of poverty. Things like family and faith. They appreciate what little they have. Those little things you overlook. They don’t keep reminding themselves of what they don’t have and live their lives miserably. That is, until the media and news reporters come in and start this whole thing of pinpointing them as 'living in poverty' and anytime somebody wanted to do a story about poor people they were the first stop. In the article, it is said that 'outside perception can hurt the self-esteem of the people who live in Appalachia.' This is the truth sadly. The stigma that "outsiders" label on these people is "poverty" to them, not their way of life. They maybe tired of being always depicted as poor and uneducated... and the article says it all, "when you portray us, please don't portray us as ignorant hill folk, I guess because we are educated. We're poor, but we're educated, and everyone's pretty proud. It's not a desolate place where no hope can be found." In conclusion, raising public-awareness is good for the overall if you want to help the poor, but we also need to be more sensitive towards others' lifestyles because words hurt more than you could know.

more...
May's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:53 AM

This article served as an eye-opener to me for many aspects and I got to know so many things that I didn’t know in the past by reading it. "... Poverty is in the eye of the beholder" says the title of the article. How true it is. Maybe for those who are well-off, you'll think straightaway that others with bad conditions of living are in poverty because that's how you see from your perspective. You choose to see the uneducated kids struggling among the jobless, drug-addicted adults and trailer homes. You tend not to see that there ARE well-paved roads, cheerful schools and beautiful mountains and that your analysis of one being in poverty is one-sided because in the eyes of those people who are in so-called "poverty", they may not see what you see. To them, they are rich in things that aren't included in any official measure of poverty. Things like family and faith. They appreciate what little they have. Those little things you overlook. They don’t keep reminding themselves of what they don’t have and live their lives miserably. That is, until the media and news reporters come in and start this whole thing of pinpointing them as 'living in poverty' and anytime somebody wanted to do a story about poor people they were the first stop. In the article, it is said that 'outside perception can hurt the self-esteem of the people who live in Appalachia.' This is the truth sadly. The stigma that "outsiders" label on these people is "poverty" to them, not their way of life. They maybe tired of being always depicted as poor and uneducated... and the article says it all, "when you portray us, please don't portray us as ignorant hill folk, I guess because we are educated. We're poor, but we're educated, and everyone's pretty proud. It's not a desolate place where no hope can be found." In conclusion, raising public-awareness is good for the overall if you want to help the poor, but we also need to be more sensitive towards others' lifestyles because words hurt more than you could know.

Lynn Keok's comment, January 27, 2014 8:43 PM
I agree. Our point of view of the supposedly poor people may not be their point of view on themselves. Their standard of life may be very different from ours, but that does not mean they are not contented. By calling them poor to the face is really an insult and like May said, hurt their self-esteem. I feel that we should only interfere when the people are really in a desperate situation.