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15 foods you can regrow from scraps

15 foods you can regrow from scraps | Poverty And Affluence | Scoop.it
The interest in urban gardening and organic foods has grown as a reaction against a mechanized, commercialization agricultural industry with genetically-modified produce.  Modern consumers are seek...

Via Seth Dixon
Timothy :)'s insight:
That is fantastic. :)
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Mary Burke's comment, April 14, 2013 5:56 PM
I love this idea. And I every one of these foods. When I'm done with school in two years I'm going to have a garden and get my grandchildren involved. They need to know where food comes from. My dream would be to grow my own food.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:37 PM
This is really cool. In this day and age so many consumers are trying to find ways to stay away from the “genetically-modified produce." Many people want to grow gardens and eat more organic and natural products. This article shows ways to grow products from scraps of food such as growing carrots from carrot tops or tomatoes from seeds. This concept is really interesting I had no idea this could be done. I think this idea will catch on and could ultimately make people healthier.
Dave Cottrell's comment, April 27, 2013 4:01 PM
This works very well. I don't just throw out tomatoes that spoil in the house or even on the vine late in the season. If you throw them into a heap in the fall with other garden scraps, they will produce very hardy plants that you can transplant in the spring. When you buy a (non GMO) pumpkin in the fall, save the seeds. Clean them well by washing them, dry them on an old towel, and plant them in cardboard egg cartons in some compost in the spring. These are just a few of the things you can grow from so-called waste!

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Rescooped by Timothy :) from The Asian Food Gazette.
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Rice Porridge | Okayu お粥

Rice Porridge | Okayu お粥 | Poverty And Affluence | Scoop.it
Just One Cookbook shares quick and easy Japanese home cooking with step by step photos.

Via Frank Kusters
Timothy :)'s insight:

That looks delicious :)

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Rescooped by Timothy :) from The Asian Food Gazette.
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Schools have knack for healthy meals

Schools have knack for healthy meals | Poverty And Affluence | Scoop.it
In Japan, school lunch means a regular meal, not one that harms your health. The food is grown locally and almost never frozen. There's no mystery behind the meat. From ...

Via Frank Kusters
Timothy :)'s insight:

If only my school did this.

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Rayn Kang Lam Fong's curator insight, February 2, 2013 10:50 PM

I see that the people in Japan are are living happy and healthier lifestyles as they eat healthy and organic food. They eat foods that are not frozen.

 

I think that the people in Japan actually suffer from very less illnesses and thus can live healthily, happily and have longer lives.

 

I wonder why the government of other countries do not practice this if they want to save money money can be earned but if a life is gone it will never come back.

Bharath Gessian's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:12 AM

The school students in this school of japan will be happy and healthy. Their school lunch is a regular lunch. It is the one that never harms our health as some food stalls in school are unhealthy and not fresh. This has been widley spread all over japan and it has shown some very good results. This can ensure that students health is always good and my question is that why don't other countries follow japan and do this method. I am sure that it will be really supported by the childrens parents. Hope they bring this aal over the world and Singapore too        

Rescooped by Timothy :) from Cayo Scoop! Bestofcayo.com's E-mag.
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Rotary Provides Cayo Villages Water Filters

Rotary Provides Cayo Villages Water Filters | Poverty And Affluence | Scoop.it

Feelgood story of the day.  Rotary brought in water filters to villages all around Belize, including 9 in Cayo.  Now many thousands more Belizeans have a clean source of water.  Thanks, Rotary!

 

"The Rotary Club of San Ignacio was pleased to partner with the Rotary Club of Belize City to distribute Sawyer Point One Water Filters to nine rural villages in the Cayo District.  Filters were delivered with the help of visiting Rotarians from Clovis, New Mexico and Tulsa, Oklahoma.  The nine villages that received filters were, Duck Run 1, Duck Run 2, Duck Run 3, Los Tambos, Santa Teresita, Selena, La Gracia, El Progresso and Cool Shade.  Providing safe drinking water is one of the main areas of focus for Rotary International and hopefully many more villages will benefit from this humanitarian effort."

 


Via Best of Cayo
Timothy :)'s insight:

Wow, that is wonderful. :)

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Alif's curator insight, January 29, 2013 9:10 PM

Pure water is rarely available in these kind of places. With people there drinking unclean water may be very dangerous for their lives. This causes many lives to be taken away due to lack of clean water. Poverty is related to water since they may not afford to buy clean water or even produce clean water. Water is essential for humans and poverty is preventing them from drinking clean water. If I am one of the children whom get to use the water filters, I would be very thankful because I will feel safe drinking water rather than having to feel unsafe and worried drinking unclean water.

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Bill Gates 2013 Annual Letter

Bill Gates 2013 Annual Letter | Poverty And Affluence | Scoop.it
@BillGates on poverty, equality & the huge importance of data http://t.co/lSJRX5Jr @Snottyganda @JuwelsM @florakaye @AmamaMbabazi @ombui
Timothy :)'s insight:

I understand better now.

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Rescooped by Timothy :) from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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2012 WISE Book | WISE - World Innovation Summit for Education

2012 WISE Book | WISE - World Innovation Summit for Education | Poverty And Affluence | Scoop.it
Over and above the annual Summit, WISE is an international initiative and platform for a multitude of established and new educational actors to collaborate proactively all year round.

Via Gust MEES
Timothy :)'s insight:

Wow. :o

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Rescooped by Timothy :) from Geography Education
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15 foods you can regrow from scraps

15 foods you can regrow from scraps | Poverty And Affluence | Scoop.it
The interest in urban gardening and organic foods has grown as a reaction against a mechanized, commercialization agricultural industry with genetically-modified produce.  Modern consumers are seek...

Via Seth Dixon
Timothy :)'s insight:
That is fantastic. :)
more...
Mary Burke's comment, April 14, 2013 5:56 PM
I love this idea. And I every one of these foods. When I'm done with school in two years I'm going to have a garden and get my grandchildren involved. They need to know where food comes from. My dream would be to grow my own food.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:37 PM
This is really cool. In this day and age so many consumers are trying to find ways to stay away from the “genetically-modified produce." Many people want to grow gardens and eat more organic and natural products. This article shows ways to grow products from scraps of food such as growing carrots from carrot tops or tomatoes from seeds. This concept is really interesting I had no idea this could be done. I think this idea will catch on and could ultimately make people healthier.
Dave Cottrell's comment, April 27, 2013 4:01 PM
This works very well. I don't just throw out tomatoes that spoil in the house or even on the vine late in the season. If you throw them into a heap in the fall with other garden scraps, they will produce very hardy plants that you can transplant in the spring. When you buy a (non GMO) pumpkin in the fall, save the seeds. Clean them well by washing them, dry them on an old towel, and plant them in cardboard egg cartons in some compost in the spring. These are just a few of the things you can grow from so-called waste!
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Poverty numbers for Toledoans rose 53.3% between 1999 and 2011 - Toledo Blade

Poverty numbers for Toledoans rose 53.3% between 1999 and 2011 Toledo Blade One in every six Ohioans and nearly a quarter of all Ohio children — including almost a third of those under age 6 — lives in poverty, according to a report released this...
Timothy :)'s insight:

That sure is pitiful.

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