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Web and Graphic Design Trends 2014 – Infographic via istock

Web and Graphic Design Trends 2014 – Infographic via istock | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Brush up on what’s trending in the creative world with this quick look at the top visual design themes and tools for 2014.

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Amanda Groover's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:43 PM

Marketing in this decade not only needs but REQUIRES the ability to think outside of the box!  Look at some of the trends appearing in a marketing campaign near you  in the next year!

Jakarta Web Developer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 5:15 PM

Web and Graphic Design Trends 2014 – Infographic via istock (Midyear Check)

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, August 12, 2014 3:06 PM

Interactive infographic:
http://www.istockphoto.com/article_view.php?ID=1619#.Uq1MuI0hZjF

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How to find free images and other resources without copyright restrictions

How to find free images and other resources without copyright restrictions | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Post on copyrights with a list of website where you can find copyright free resources.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ed Bremner's curator insight, March 3, 6:49 AM

Not adding this to my imaging channel but to my TEL one.  This is just the kind of course that I often run and give myself.

Jennifer Gandarias's curator insight, March 3, 11:49 PM

These are great sites to add to a bank of creative commons image sites.  All book or class projects need to use creative commons as the baseline of their projects.

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These 14 giant corporations dominate the global auto industry

These 14 giant corporations dominate the global auto industry | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
The automotive industry has experienced some...
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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Via callooh
Josie Gibson's insight:

Fascinating and instructive exploration of approaches to how we learn and progress.

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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, February 25, 5:45 PM

Well done mindmap about learning theories.

Richard Whiteside's curator insight, February 27, 4:53 AM

Really useful mindmap with links to further info about the theories and theorists. Shame it isn't in an easily downloadable format.

Cris Mepham's curator insight, February 27, 6:52 AM

If you need a few ideas!

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Elements of Learning Experience Design

Elements of Learning Experience Design | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

The process of designing any sort of human experience, regardless of purpose or platform, is centered around reaching a desired outcome, ideally with as little fuss and as much joy as possible.

The purpose of an experience and the platform on which the experience takes place will vary: purchasing a plane ticket on a tablet to vacation, enjoying a musical performance in a theater, or learning to code in a classroom. Although each of these experiences require their own unique methods and frameworks, the elements that should be taken into consideration during the design process remain mostly the same.

 

As a learning experience designer, you should focus your time and attention during the strategy plane on identifying the gaps that exist between the learner and his/her desired outcome. Those gaps exist due to a lack of the following:

Knowledge: Do learners lack the proper information to complete a task?Skill: Do they have all of the right information but lack the ability to translate that knowledge into action that could be applied to a given situation?Confidence: Are they able to demonstrate or apply the skill, but do they hesitate or refuse to apply it?Motivation: Are they able to demonstrate or apply the skill confidently but just don’t want to do it?Access: Do they have all of the above but lack the proper tools or resources to complete a task?

Once you are able to properly identify the gaps that cause learners to struggle, you must design a solution that effectively addresses those gaps.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn

 


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Shafeeq Husain's curator insight, February 23, 8:57 PM

Just like any experiences, learning experiences also need to well designed. After deciding on outcome to be achieved of learning particular course (learning outcome), gaps to reaching the outcome should be identified at requirement plane, strategy plane, interaction plane and sensory plane. In course of doing so, gaps in knowledge, skills, confidence, motivation and access that learners may have should be addressed through course delivery, that careful planning be made through the planning, determination of objectives, implementation and evaluation stage of curriculum.

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, February 24, 2:31 AM

Good!

MONICA LOPEZ SIEBEN's curator insight, February 25, 4:26 AM

Un artículo muy claro y muy interesante.

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Scientists discover that eyes really are 'the window to the soul'

The eyes really are a window to the soul, according to scientists.

Patterns in the iris can give an indication of whether we are warm and trusting or neurotic and impulsive, research has found.

Everyone has a different structure of lines, dots and colours in their iris.

So scientists at Orebro University in Sweden compared the eyes of 428 subjects with their personality traits to see if these structures in the iris reflected their characters.

They focused on patterns in crypts - threads which radiate from the pupil - and contraction furrows - lines curving around the outer edge - which are formed when the pupils dilate.

Their findings showed those with denselypacked crypts are more warmhearted, tender, trusting, and likely to sympathize with others. In comparison, those with more contraction furrows were more neurotic, impulsive and likely to give way to cravings.

The researchers argued that eye structure and personality could be linked because the genes responsible for the development of the

iris also play a role in shaping part of the frontal lobe of the brain, which influences personality.

They say the findings could one day be used in psychoanalysis and by companies screening candidates for jobs.

The results will be published in the American journal Biological Psychology. 'Our results suggest people with different iris features tend to develop along different personality lines,' said Matt Larsson, a behavioral scientist who led the study at Orebro University.'These findings support the notion that people with different iris configurations tend to develop along different trajectories in regards to personality.

'Differences in the iris can be used as a biomarker that reflects differences between people.'

The scientists suggested these differences are due to genetic variation, and pointed to the involvement of a gene called PAX6. This gene helps control the formation of the iris in embryos. Previous research has shown that a mutation of it is linked to impulsiveness and poor social skills.

The speed and accuracy with which irises can be mapped means there is growing interest in using photographs of eyes for security as well as research purposes.

The Government is testing the use of digital photographs of the iris on 'biometric' passports and identity cards.

Trials of the iris technology have been taking place at Heathrow, Gatwick and Manchester airports.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-436932/Scientists-discover-eyes-really-window-soul.html#ixzz3SOiahqxm


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 21, 5:49 PM

This is an interesting article.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Gust MEES's curator insight, February 21, 6:02 PM

The eyes really are a window to the soul, according to scientists.

Patterns in the iris can give an indication of whether we are warm and trusting or neurotic and impulsive, research has found.

Everyone has a different structure of lines, dots and colours in their iris.

So scientists at Orebro University in Sweden compared the eyes of 428 subjects with their personality traits to see if these structures in the iris reflected their characters.

They focused on patterns in crypts - threads which radiate from the pupil - and contraction furrows - lines curving around the outer edge - which are formed when the pupils dilate.

Their findings showed those with denselypacked crypts are more warmhearted, tender, trusting, and likely to sympathize with others. In comparison, those with more contraction furrows were more neurotic, impulsive and likely to give way to cravings.

The researchers argued that eye structure and personality could be linked because the genes responsible for the development of the iris also play a role in shaping part of the frontal lobe of the brain, which influences personality.

They say the findings could one day be used in psychoanalysis and by companies screening candidates for jobs.

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Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old | Penn State University

Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old | Penn State University | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Such changes, Li and colleagues suggested while reviewing a number of related studies, are consistent with anatomical changes that can occur in the brain as a result of learning a second language, no matter the age of the learner, as they reported in a recent issue of Cortex.

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Lisa Gorman's curator insight, February 9, 11:39 PM

I really love languages but I have only ever really mastered one.  Here's proof that one of my future goals really needs to be to decide and commit to Spanish, French or Indonesian... 

Helen Teague's curator insight, February 13, 7:00 PM

very useful article and I like the multigenerational emphasis

Pamela Hills's curator insight, February 22, 8:28 AM

There are parts of our brain laying dormant. Wake them up and learn a language . You are never to young or old to learn.

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In Singapore, a Failure to Fail

Government support is beneficial, but venture capitalist investor Mike Maples recently made a point in a conversation with TechCrunch that crystallized a nagging concern that I’ve had about Singapore: it’s too hard for companies to fail.

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Storytelling, Sense-making, and Systems Thinking

Storytelling, Sense-making, and Systems Thinking | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

“I teach a class in systems thinking perspectives on public health. This past week we discussed the role of narratives and storytelling as ways to learn about systems and how to organize diverse inf...”


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george_reed's curator insight, February 9, 2:21 PM

Some might argue that systems thinking is really just a way of capturing the story of a social dynamic. That is a form of sense- making.

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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 22, 11:56 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 3:11 PM

The reason why most of Africa and southern Asia has a low Human Development Index is because Africa and southern Asia has a high homelessness rate in comparison to other places and also, their economy is not as strong as Russia's, United States' or Europe's. It is cliché that Africa is mostly known for it's natural environments. Also, the Urban population in Africa is not as much as the Urban population in North America, South America, Europe, Russia and Australia.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 30, 10:23 AM

A bit old, but still useful info...

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17 ways to know you were born to be an entrepreneur | Leader.co.za

17 ways to know you were born to be an entrepreneur | Leader.co.za | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Being an entrepreneur is hard. Really hard. 

You put everything on the line: your talent, your creativity, your ideas, your money, and yet you still do it, sometimes again and again. That's why your friends often don't understand. (Sometimes even your family doesn't understand.)  'Why don't you just play it safe and get a job?" they ask. The next time people ask, show them this. t can be hard to explain to non-entrepreneurs why you choose such a challenging journey. Here's what to tell them.

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Being a Better Online Reader - The New Yorker

Being a Better Online Reader - The New Yorker | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Certainly, as we turn to online reading, the physiology of the reading process itself shifts; we don’t read the same way online as we do on paper. Anne Mangen, a professor at the National Centre for Reading Education and Research at the University of Stavanger, in Norway, points out that reading is always an interaction between a person and a technology, be it a computer or an e-reader or even a bound book.

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AugusII's curator insight, February 1, 9:27 PM

BETTER READING LESS BEING DECEIVED PROBABILITY

Linda Mercer's curator insight, February 2, 12:12 PM

I think it's harder to read ebooks than printed books. But what about children wired at the start to read electronically?

Erica Bilder's curator insight, February 6, 4:05 AM

How the medium matters in deep digital reading and how we can improve on it.

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Creative destruction is how India can catch up to China

Creative destruction is how India can catch up to China | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
The ideological battle being fought in India is coming at the expense of economic development. The country needs a dose of East Asian ruthlessness to lift hundreds of millions out of poverty.
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How Xerox Jumpstarts Transformation through "Dreaming Sessions"

How Xerox Jumpstarts Transformation through "Dreaming Sessions" | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Fifteen years ago, some analysts believed Xerox Corp. was headed for bankruptcy. Instead it has managed to achieve what very few established enterprises can claim: a transformation from one type of company to another. Faced with a disruption and decline in its core copier and printer business, Xerox embarked on a difficult, long-term journey to become a major player in business process services.

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The 13 Worst Pieces of Business Advice EverSwitch & Shift

The 13 Worst Pieces of Business Advice EverSwitch & Shift | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Great selection of well-meaning - if ill-informed - business tips to ignore...

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Dazzling display of light by auroras on Saturn

Dazzling display of light by auroras on Saturn | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Scientists first observed Saturn’s auroras in 1979. Decades later, these shimmering ribbons of light still fascinate. For one thing they’re magnificently tall, rising hundreds of miles above the planet’s poles. And unlike on Earth where bright displays fizzle after only a few hours, auroras on Saturn can shine for days. Auroras are produced when speeding particles accelerated by the sun’s energy collide with gases in a planet’s atmosphere. The gases fluoresce, emitting flashes of light at different wavelengths. Watch the video to see an edge-on view of Saturn’s northern and southern lights courtesy of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.


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Innovation and Organizational Culture

Innovation and Organizational Culture | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Recently, the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) has published key findings of their latest "Most Innovative Companies 2014" survey. Beside the annual ranking, headed by the top three companies Apple, G...
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Roundup on latest BCG survey by Ralph-Christian Ohr..

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The Alternative Futures of Work

The Alternative Futures of Work | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

While we cannot fully predict the future, we can imagine it and prepare. When we think about the future it is natural to think about events that are a continuation of today; these are the probable futures. But surprising futures, initiated by unforeseen events, are also possible and as such are worth our consideration.


In this piece Frog Design explores the implications of several alternative futures on the workplace and the workforce.

 

 


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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, February 21, 3:06 PM

Predicting how surprising future scenarios might impact a worker’s needs.


Daniel Egger's curator insight, February 21, 3:17 PM

The main implications lie in the way of how our day-by-day life is organized. With the listed changes affecting the work structure, we lead with an increasing flexibility and uncertainty in income. Our consumption patterns as well the fix costs however have to change, new financial solutions created.  Beside those increasing uncertainties in the workforce, living patterns, family structures, romantic relationships, and perception of success will dramatically challenge  our emotional balance affecting directly our well-being

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The Under-Appreciated Benefits of Creative Consistency

The Under-Appreciated Benefits of Creative Consistency | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
It's familiar advice to anyone who pursues creative endeavors: the typical creative process isn't one punctuated by bursts of brilliance, but is instead a long term development of a consistent work habit. Consistency doesn't count for everything, but it sure counts for a whole lot.
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#Connectivism #Infographic

#Connectivism #Infographic | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

The 8 Principles of Connectivism in a nice infographic. What does an online connectivist course look like? #CMOOC


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Jean-Louis LEFEBVRE's curator insight, February 5, 4:19 AM

Leçon d'infographie dans une présentation visuelle du connectivisme.

Richard Samson's curator insight, February 9, 2:35 AM

Is Moodle connectivist (Piaget)? Or socioconstructivist (Vygotsky)? (Have I got those associations right?) Or is it both? Hey-ho! More work to do! 

Jason Leong's curator insight, February 11, 4:35 AM

"#4 Capacity to know is more critical than what is currently known, i.e. "Know-where is more important than know-how and know-what""

 

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Complexity

Complexity | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
The way we want to make sense of the world around us often has to do with causality. The question we ask is what caused "it" to happen. The mainstream approach is that an arrow, or arrows, can be d...
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100 Years of National Geographic Maps

100 Years of National Geographic Maps | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Since 1915, National Geographic cartographers have charted earth, seas, and skies in maps capable of evoking dreams.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 12:47 PM

Maps chart places, but the very act of making them can also reshape how we think about places and alter history.


Tags: historicalmapping, National Geographic.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 5, 12:35 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 5, 5:17 AM

Beautiful article on an amazing organisation - the history of maps and map-making tells us so much about how people have viewed the world through history - great for year 7.

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Why KPIs are not the answer for complex systems (part 2) | knowquestion :: Stephen Bounds

Why KPIs are not the answer for complex systems (part 2) | knowquestion :: Stephen Bounds | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
RT @SLHBENNETT: New thinking about #KPIs, tradeoffs and change in organizations. http://t.co/9FLlfz77l6 via @smbounds #complexity http://t.…

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Complexity and Collapse | What-is-Growth

Complexity and Collapse | What-is-Growth | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
There is no better illustration of the life cycle of a great power than The Course of Empire, a series of five paintings by Thomas Cole that hang in the New-York Historical Society.

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AleksBlumentals's curator insight, November 24, 2014 2:53 AM

Great powers and empires are, I would suggest, complex systems, made up of a very large number of interacting components that are asymmetrically organized, which means their construction more resembles a termite hill than an Egyptian pyramid.


They operate somewhere between order and disorder – on “the edge of chaos,” in the phrase of the computer scientist Christopher Langton. Such systems can appear to operate quite stably for some time; they seem to be in equilibrium but are, in fact, constantly adapting. But there comes a moment when complex systems “go critical.” 


A very small trigger can set off a “phase transition” from a benign equilibrium to a crisis – a single grain of sand causes a whole pile to collapse, or a butterfly flaps its wings in the Amazon and brings about a hurricane in southeastern England.


Not long after such crises happen, historians arrive on the scene. They are the scholars who specialize in the study of “fat tail” events – the low-frequency, high-impact moments that inhabit the tails of probability distributions, such as wars, revolutions, financial crashes, and imperial collapses. But historians often misunderstand complexity in decoding these events. They are trained to explain calamity in terms of long-term causes, often dating back decades.


This is what Nassim Taleb rightly condemned in The Black Swan as “the narrative fallacy”: the construction of psychologically satisfying stories on the principle of post hoc, ergo propter hoc.


Defeat in the mountains of the Hindu Kush or on the plains of Mesopotamia has long been a harbinger of imperial fall. It is no coincidence that the Soviet Union withdrew from Afghanistan in the annus mirabilis of 1989. What happened 20 years ago, like the events of the distant fifth century, is a reminder that empires do not in fact appear, rise, reign, decline, and fall according to some recurrent and predictable life cycle. It is historians who retrospectively portray the process of imperial dissolution as slow-acting, with multiple overdetermining causes. Rather, empires behave like all complex adaptive systems. They function in apparent equilibrium for some unknowable period. And then, quite abruptly, they collapse.


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Chinese innovation and the Haier model

Chinese innovation and the Haier model | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
The man who helped turn a Chinese state-owned fridge maker into a global white goods giant plans to transform the company into a platform for innovation.
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When It Comes to Digital Innovation, Less Action, More Thought

When It Comes to Digital Innovation, Less Action, More Thought | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

A few years ago, we had an idea for a new business opportunity. One of our colleagues owned a restaurant and was complaining about the amount of money he lost because expensive bottles of liquor often went missing (the industry calls this “shrinkage”). This is a problem affecting tens of thousands of restaurants — an attractive target market. So, like good innovators, we began working on a solution to our colleague’s problem by building an automatic liquor inventory-management system.

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