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Why Low Risk Innovation Is Costly

Why Low Risk Innovation Is Costly | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Companies are finding it hard to churn out “the next big thing.” Instead of the disruptive products, services and business models of yesteryear, innovations coming to market today are typically line extensions.

 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, June 24, 2013 9:57 AM

Accenture survey of 519 executives at large US, UK and French organizations reveals that two obstacles stand in the way of driving higher returns on innovation. 

 

Read also this article from Innovation Management on the same subject: http://www.innovationmanagement.se/2013/06/24/7-tips-for-outcome-driven-innovation/

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Why Collaboration Often Fails

Why Collaboration Often Fails | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Collaboration is an important part of everyday work life. Yet it surprisingly doesn't always result in the best quality work.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 7, 8:53 PM

What's wrong with collaboration? Here are just a few issues you might run into when members of a team put their heads together.

howtoselllaptop's curator insight, September 8, 5:57 AM

cash for laptops, sell laptops

Stephen Dale's curator insight, September 10, 6:29 AM

Some useful tips to encourage better collaboration. Encouraging to note that the author recommends "alone time", i.e.time to reflect, learn and prepare. Managers need to recognise that not all of the best work is done in teams and through collaboration. Personal knowledge development is so often overlooked. 

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Seeing Your Innovating Future Across Different Horizons

The three horizons offer us much to frame our innovating future Following a couple of recent posts on reflecting on the three horizons methodology, firstly here and then here, I wanted to come back to where I see real value, in managing innovation into the future. The 3H methodology enables us to look out into…
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Breaking Down the Freelance Economy

Breaking Down the Freelance Economy | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

The American workforce is now 34% freelancer, according to a new study commissioned by the Freelancers Union and the recently-merged Elance-oDesk. Well, sort of: 14.3 million of the 53 million freelancers counted in the survey are “moonlighters” (people with full-time jobs doing independent work in their spare time). Another 5.5 million are temp workers.

Josie Gibson's insight:

Is the US becoming 'a nation of free agents, freelancers or supertemps', and what does that mean for the rest of the world?

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Five-year-olds to be taught computer programming and foreign languages

Five-year-olds to be taught computer programming and foreign languages | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Children aged just five to seven will be required to create and debug simple computer programs in the first two years of school, as part of lessons designed to stop English pupils falling behind their peers in other countries.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coding

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/coding-a-new-trend-in-education-and-a-big-responsibility/

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 3, 4:50 AM
Children aged just five to seven will be required to create and debug simple computer programs in the first two years of school, as part of lessons designed to stop English pupils falling behind their peers in other countries.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Coding


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/coding-a-new-trend-in-education-and-a-big-responsibility/


Pauline Kershaw's curator insight, September 4, 4:36 AM

Read this story. Do you wish you had been taught programming in school ? Do you think this is a good thing? Will this make GCSE and A level Computing harder in the future? Will this mean that there needs to be more computing teachers  Bring your thoughts to your next computing class.

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 4, 10:17 AM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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An Architecture Festival that Celebrates the Arctic - Point of View - August 2014

An Architecture Festival that Celebrates the Arctic - Point of View - August 2014 | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

This weekend, a tiny Norwegian island in the Arctic Circle is host to a architecture and culture festival that is anything but small. Set upon the white sandy beaches of Sandhornøy,SALT features three monumental structures that were inspired by traditional Norwegian fiskehjeller(fish racks) and designed by Rintala Eggertsson Architects. In celebration the days and nights are filled with performances, art events, and opportunities to enjoy the food from SALT’s Restaurant Gildeskål. “We developed this idea that we wanted to focus on the Arctic region and the history, the present time, and the future of this area,” says the curator Helga-Marie Nordby who cofounded SALT with cultural entrepreneur Erlend Mogård-Larsen. “The focus point is to create art and culture events to engage people in the region.

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“Humans Need Not Apply”: great video on automation and human work (via Slate). Must watch. - Futurist, Author & Keynote Speaker Gerd Leonhard

“Humans Need Not Apply”: great video on automation and human work (via Slate). Must watch. - Futurist, Author & Keynote Speaker Gerd Leonhard | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

This past January, the Economist set off alarm bells when it noted in a story on the future of work that 47 percent of jobs were at risk of becoming automated in the next two decades. Telemarketers. Retail salespeople. Commercial pilots. Economists. Even actors and editors. Like it or not, the robots are coming, and sooner or later they’ll probably come for your job.

Josie Gibson's insight:

Dark but worth watching...

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Photos from the days when thousands of cables crowded the skies

Photos from the days when thousands of cables crowded the skies | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Before most cables ran underground, all electrical, telephone and telegraph wires were suspended from high poles, creating strange and crowded streetscapes. Here are some typical views of late-19th century Boston, New York, Stockholm, and other wire-filled cities.


Via Luca Baptista
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Publishing Is Not Dying

Publishing Is Not Dying | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

If marketers want to produce content, they need to think like publishers. After all, content isn’t an extension of marketing, it’s an extension of publishing. I am hardly the only one to make that case, but skeptics are still vocal in their disagreement. “Aren’t publishers failing?” they say. How can I hold up a struggling industry as a model? If publishing is a viable model, why aren’t publishers making money? These sentiments are common, but they are not based in fact. In truth, publishing is flourishing, creating massive new fortunes for entrepreneurs and more choices for consumers. It’s also attracting large investments by established companies and venture capitalists. Though not everyone prospers, there has never been a better time for publishers.

 

Josie Gibson's insight:

An upbeat post from Greg Satell on publishing's bright prospects.

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Scientists Cannot Explain This Crazy Ant Behavior, but They Love It

Scientists Cannot Explain This Crazy Ant Behavior, but They Love It | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Watch as this colony forms a daisy chain to pull a millipede—a behavior researchers have never seen before.
Josie Gibson's insight:

Gratifying to learn we can still be surprised by nature's ingenuity.

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6 Ways Your Brain Tries To Kill Your Ideas And How To Fight Them

6 Ways Your Brain Tries To Kill Your Ideas And How To Fight Them | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

I have a lot of ideas in my head. And for the most part, that’s where they used to stay. In my head. Where other people couldn’t see them, interact with them or build upon them. Where they were safe and untested and uncriticized. All mine. Sure, I’ve created some. Some might say I’ve created plenty. But that’s only because they can’t see what I’m not creating. For example, this very post sat dormant for at least a month while I pondered, waited and nitpicked at it. Because the riskiest, most dangerous and potentially most interesting ideas are the easiest to hold back. 

Josie Gibson's insight:

Good piece on the ways we trick ourselves out of creative success.

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10 Awesome Videos On Idea Execution & The Creative Process

10 Awesome Videos On Idea Execution & The Creative Process | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
It's time to get inspired about idea execution. Check our shortlist of great videos that get inside the brains of exceptionally productive creatives.
Josie Gibson's insight:

Some oldies, many goodies. Worth investing time in.

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What & Why People Share On Social Media (Infographic)

What & Why People Share On Social Media (Infographic) | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

What people are sharing and how they’re sharing it is changing fast. A new infographic from Go-Gulf, a web design team based in Dubai, has gathered the latest data, which is now available in this newly released (July 2014) social media infographic. Here are the highlights…


Via Lauren Moss
Josie Gibson's insight:

Fascinating statistics on gender and cultural usage patterns.

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Nicoletta Gay's curator insight, September 8, 4:23 AM

Infographic, highlights and useful social media strategy takeaways.

Lee Erpelo's curator insight, September 11, 3:16 PM

Some rules change, but this info shows that photos still perform better than text links on social networks.

In addition, marketers should pay attention to the reasons behind what drives people to share. You can definitely guarantee more views and more shares when you put more effort in understanding the motivations people have to share a specific piece of content.

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 15, 7:54 AM

For more resources on Social Media & Content Curation visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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Teams Can’t Innovate If They’re Too Comfortable

Teams Can’t Innovate If They’re Too Comfortable | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Spark Camp is designed to bring together difference. Conveners Matt Thompson, Amanda Michel, Amy Webb, Jenny 8 Lee, and Andrew Pergam launched it because they were tired of going to conferences where they heard the same stories, by the same people, often without any opportunity for challenging the fundamental premise.

 
Josie Gibson's insight:

1. Decide difference matters

2. Define what difference means

3. Be relentless

4. Measure everything

5. Set up ground rules

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The New Rules of the Social Age

The New Rules of the Social Age | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
The Industrial Age has ended. In this guest post, Ted Coine shares 3 rules for leaders to ensure their organization survive, and thrive, in the Social Age.

Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, September 11, 2:19 PM

It’s the Social Age now, and it will be for quite some time to come.

Jacob Froelich's curator insight, September 11, 7:01 PM

The history books will be written about the actions and decisions we make today! Exciting!

Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, September 14, 10:46 AM

What used to seem very good leadership practices in the Industrial Age was good, or at least efficient. But the Industrial Age is over. And it’s not coming back. It’s the Social Age now, and it will be for quite some time to come.

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Win Investor Hearts & Minds in 5 Minutes: 10 Tips + @Scenttrail Note

Win Investor Hearts & Minds in 5 Minutes: 10 Tips + @Scenttrail Note | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Mark Twain noted few souls are saved after the first 10 minutes of the sermon. Your pitch has, maybe, half that time.

1. Do some research.

2. Connect with your audience on a human level.

3. Tell a story they can relate to.

4. Share facts.

5. Be subtle -- don't give it all away.

6. Make them laugh.

7. Create a sense of urgency.

8. Make a bold statement.

9. Make your final words count.

Marty Note
Great post I would change the order and add a few. Here are my 10 Tips To Win Investor Hearts & Minds:

1. Slow DOWN, SMILE and be IN THE MOMENT.
2. Open with a BOLD statement.

3. Note any connection no matter how remote (based on research).

4. Tease with cliffhangers & Speak In Sound Bites.
5. Tell A Story relevant to them based on your research. Don't say "I want to tell a story" as that sounds like it will take too much time.
6. Do Research To Know What Is Relevant.
7. Use P&G Presentation Summary (see below).
8. Find URGENCY in your story and highlight it.
9. Weave facts INTO your story.
10. Close with a question that ties your story to their context and ask if they are in. Whatever they say check it back with them by summarizing and asking if you understand.

Want to emphasis 3 things: NOW, P&G & Closing.

NOW
This is YOUR meeting. The first thing they are going to want to do is be IN CONTROL and be the ALPHA dogs. Money needs ideas and ideas need money. YOU are an EQUAL even if you are sitting in Kleiner Perkins Caufield (which I would imagine is fairly intimidating).

Powerful RICH people respect people who don't need them. Whoops, let me amend that. "Appear" to not need them. Think of SnapChat turning down billions. Why? Because they KNOW they have something and its THEIRS. When someone makes the right offer for collaboration they will do the deal.

Go hat in hand to an investor meeting and you are dead before you start. THINK about anything OTHER than what is happening in that room in that time and you are dead. If the meeting feels unequal or uncomfortable check-in, ask a question and channel the moment.

NEVER project. Don't meet thinking the partnership and the money will magically complete you. It doesn't and can't, so release any thought of yesterday or tomorrow and be simply and completely in that room listening with every atom in your body.

P&G
P&G taught a helpful way to organize a sales presentation:

* Summarize The Situation (discuss the market, macro trends & threads that led you to start a company).
* State The Idea.
* Explain How It Works.
* Discuss Benefits.

Done right this format becomes a seamless story with threads and hooks. Hooks are cliffhanger you pay off in the next section. If you are meeting with sailors frame some of your analogies with sailing references. Careful NOT to presume too much. Stay TOPICAL with your relevant analogies so you don't appear to be challenging their expertise (in golf, sailing, cycling, cancer survival, ivy league schools, prep schools or whatever).

Closing
"Close early and often," is how P&G taught me to sell soap. You aren't selling soap, but respect buying signals. My boss said, "Marty learn to take YES for an answer". You should too.

Don't win by talking. You win MONEY and HEARTS by LISTENING more than you talk. Treat every question as if there is a hidden subtext - something they want to share. Don't NOT answer a question, but always check-in after you do. "Did I answer your question," is a simple check-in.

If you are speaking in short "sound bites" not Hamlet-like speeches your answers won't delay the subtext they want to share. The people across do deals daily, so they will be FAST. Fast is fine as long as you don't feel pressured or ill-at-ease.

If you feel EITHER fast or ill-at-east RUN don't walk away from the deal. Whatever feeling you have in the "invest in you meeting" only gets magnified once you take their money. SO if you aren't in love with them too RUN AWAY.

One thing the Big C taught me is DO WHAT YOU LOVE with THOSE YOU LOVE and no amount of money is worth losing the company you love. Make no mistake. There are many ways to lose your company. One way is if it feels like a JOB. You don't work for them. You are collaborating with them.

Money isn't as hard to find as them make it feel. Great partners you can love are RARE and very hard to find. Focus on the PEOPLE not the money and you may win VC hearts and minds.

 

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Creativity Creep - The New Yorker

Creativity Creep - The New Yorker | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

In our day, art has been recast as work: it’s now difficult to speak about creativity without also invoking a profession of some kind.


Via Sarah Catherine Firth
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Fred Zimny's curator insight, September 4, 12:17 AM
Intruiging read about art, profession and creativty
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China's Answer To Google Glass: Baidu Eye

China's Answer To Google Glass: Baidu Eye | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it


Baidu, China's largest search engine, on Wednesday showed off a working prototype of a head-mounted device aimed at consumers called Baidu Eye. Baidu's new wearable tethers to a smartphone, recognizes voice and gesture commands, and includes an earpiece and camera. Unlike Google Glass, Baidu Eye lacks a screen.

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Why Being Different Can Kill Your Business - Stephen Shapiro

Why Being Different Can Kill Your Business - Stephen Shapiro | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Being different for the sake of being different is a losing proposition. So how do you stand out from the crowd? Find your true differentiator. 

Josie Gibson's insight:

Good piece from Stephen Shapiro on the difference between differentiation and 'being different' for the sake of it...

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Assessing the International Spreading Risk Associated with the 2014 West African Ebola Outbreak

Assessing the International Spreading Risk Associated with the 2014 West African Ebola Outbreak | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) that started in December 2013 has defied several months of mitigation and containment efforts. In July 2014 it was still evolving in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. As of 20 August, the toll in those countries had reached 844 EVD confirmed deaths 1. On 20 July, the outbreak reached Nigeria through an infected traveler coming from Liberia. The Nigerian official reports list 12 probable cases, and it is not clear if the outbreak has been contained.

 

EVD is caused by infection with a virus of the family Filoviridae, genus Ebolavirus 2. EVD transmission during the incubation period is very unlikely and occurs via direct contact with blood, secretions, and/or other bodily fluids of dead or living infected persons. Gene sequencing of the virus causing the 2014 West African (2014WA) outbreak has demonstrated 98% homology with the Zaire Ebola virus, with a 55% case fatality ratio (CFR) across the affected countries 3. Unfortunately there are no licensed treatments available for EVD, and severely ill patients can only be cared for with intensive supportive care.

 

The 2014WA outbreak is the largest ever observed, both by number of cases and geographical extension. For this reason, on 6-7 August, an Emergency Committee of the WHO 4 advised the 2014WA outbreak constitutes an ’extraordinary event’ and a public health risk to other States. Indeed, although the outbreak started in an isolated region of Guinea, transmission has occurred in large cities (Conakry, Freetown, Monrovia and Lagos) of the four affected countries. These urban areas have major international airports, thus raising concern about a quick internationalization of the outbreak (see Fig. 1). While importation of cases should not generate large outbreaks in countries where prompt isolation of cases in appropriate health care facilities occurs, it is clear that a quantitative analysis of the risk of importation of cases (likelihood, timeline, number of cases) in countries not affected at the moment by the outbreak may provide valuable intelligence on the evolution of the 2014WA outbreak.

 

So far most of the analyses on the risk of international spread of the outbreak have focused on the analysis of the sheer volume of international passenger traffic across countries 5,6. These analyses however do not consider the local evolution of the outbreak in the affected countries and the specific etiology of the disease (incubation time scale, etc.). Here we provide a quantitative assessment of the international spread based on large-scale computer microsimulations of the 2014WA outbreak that generate stochastic simulations of epidemic spread worldwide, yielding, among other measures, the case importation events at a daily resolution for 3,362 subpopulations in 220 countries. We use the Global Epidemic and Mobility Model that integrates high-resolution data on human demography and mobility on a worldwide scale in a metapopulation stochastic epidemic model 7,8,9. The disease dynamics within each population consider explicitly that EVD transmissions occur in the general community, in hospital settings, and during funeral rites 10. For parameter inference, we use a Monte Carlo likelihood analysis that considers more than 1,000,000 simulations that sample the disease model space and the data on the 2014WA outbreak up to 9 August 2014. This approach selects the disease dynamic model that we use to generate numerical stochastic simulations of an epidemic’s local (within West African countries) and global progression.

 

We evaluate the progression of the epidemic in West Africa and its international spread under the assumption that the EVD outbreak continues to evolve at the current pace. The numerical simulation results show a steep increase of cases in the West Africa region, unless the transmissibility of the EVD is successfully mitigated. The overall basic reproductive number of the epidemic in the region is estimated to be in the range 1.5 − 2.0. We find that, although surveillance and containment measures have been in place for several months, the transmissibility in hospital and funeral rites are likely an appreciable component of the overall transmissibility. The probability of case exportation is extremely modest (upper bound less than 5%) for non-African countries, with the exception of the United Kingdom (UK), Belgium, France and the United States (US). As of the beginning of September, the countries with the largest probability of seeing the arrival of EVD cases are Ghana, UK and Gambia. The overall probability of international spread will increase if the Nigerian outbreak is not promptly controlled. We also show that as of the end of September, the size distribution of outbreaks due to the international spread of the EVD is contained (median value <4 cases) for countries outside of the African region. Severe travel restrictions to and from the affected areas (80% airline traffic reduction) generates only a 3-4 weeks delay in the international spreading.

 

The lack of detailed data on the 2014WA EVD outbreak makes any modeling approach vulnerable to the many assumptions and uncertainty about basic parameters and the quality of data. However, we hope that the characterization of the EVD 2014WA outbreak and the associated risk of international spread provided here may be useful to national and international agencies in allocating resources for interventions to contain and to mitigate the epidemic.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Four Principles For An Open Digital World - author Don Tapscott TED Talk Video

4 Principles of A Networked World
Macrowikinomics author Don Tapscott shares great examples of his 4 emerging principles of our new digital world including:

* Collaboration.

* Transparency.

* Sharing.
* Empowerment

Marty Note
I found the discussion of the commons and the example of starling flocking behavior (at the end) the most resonant. I'd heard about the gold mine several times and agree with Tapscott - crowds are the key to our web future.

At Curagami we've been working on what it means to create online community. CTSE (Collaboration, Transparency, Sharing, Empowerment) are the table stakes of this new poker. We would add:

* Communication.
* UGC.
* Gamification.

Communication within and around the hub is a CSF (Critical Success Factor) for online community. You need to be able to follow and communicate with me and vice versa.

User Generated Content must be listened to, valued and rewarded with gamification or its a one-time "one and done" thing.


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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malek's curator insight, September 2, 1:00 PM

Highly engaging presentation. Gone are the days of Security and Reliability as the principles of a Networked world. The C-generation is pulling us to the CTSE world.

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Are internal start-ups cannibals or category killers?

Are internal start-ups cannibals or category killers? | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Internal start-ups are being used increasingly by large corporations to test new ideas and strategies, but their success can be a double-edged sword for parent companies.
Josie Gibson's insight:

Success stories from corporate Australia.

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Innovate on Purpose: Innovation in developing economies

Innovate on Purpose: Innovation in developing economies | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

Recently I was asked by a Twitter user to talk about innovation in developing countries, especially in Asia.  While I have some experience with innovation, and have been to some countries in Asia, and have even led programs on innovation in two (China and Malaysia), I'm not a economic development expert.  But I did offer to give my opinions on the evolution of innovation in developing countries, so here goes. 

Josie Gibson's insight:

Excellent piece by Jeffrey Phillips on the constraints/opportunities for innovation in emerging economies vs the West.

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How Where You Live Impacts the Way You Use the Internet

How Where You Live Impacts the Way You Use the Internet | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

According to a new book by Wharton marketing professor David R. Bell, where you live dictates how you use the Internet. In Location Is (Still) Everything: The Surprising Influence of the Real World on How We Search, Shop, and Sell in the Virtual One, Bell provides a framework for those who wish to understand why we use the Internet as we do.

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Sand Pile Model of the Mind Grows in Popularity

Sand Pile Model of the Mind Grows in Popularity | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it
Support is growing for a decades-old physics idea suggesting that localized episodes of disordered brain activity help keep the overall system in healthy balance

Via Claudia Mihai
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Curiosity Is as Important as Intelligence

Curiosity Is as Important as Intelligence | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

There seems to be wide support for the idea that we are living in an “age of complexity”, which implies that the world has never been more intricate. This idea is based on the rapid pace of technological changes, and the vast amount of information that we are generating (the two are related). Yet consider that philosophers like Leibniz (17th century) and Diderot (18th century) were already complaining about information overload. The “horrible mass of books” they referred to may have represented only a tiny portion of what we know today, but much of what we know today will be equally insignificant to future generations.

Josie Gibson's insight:

Nice introduction to the concept of CQ (curiosity quotient).

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