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Latest thinking on the emerging world - disruption, innovation and creativity
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Alan Eustace, Google, Jumps From Top of Stratosphere, Falling Faster Than The Speed of Sound

Alan Eustace, Google, Jumps From Top of Stratosphere, Falling Faster Than The Speed of Sound | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

A well-known computer scientist parachuted from a balloon near the top of the stratosphere on Friday, falling faster than the speed of sound and breaking the world altitude record set just two years ago.


The jump was made by Alan Eustace, 57, a senior vice president at Google. At dawn he was lifted by a balloon filled with 35,000 cubic feet of helium, from an abandoned runway at the airport here.


For a little over two hours, the balloon ascended at speeds up to 1,600 feet per minute to an altitude of 135,908 feet, more than 25 miles. Mr. Eustace dangled underneath in a specially designed spacesuit with an elaborate life-support system. He returned to earth just 15 minutes after starting his fall.


“It was amazing,” he said. “It was beautiful. You could see the darkness of space and you could see the layers of atmosphere, which I had never seen before.”


Mr. Eustace cut himself loose from the balloon with the aid of a small explosive device and plummeted toward the earth at a speeds that peaked at more than 800 miles per hour, setting off a small sonic boom heard by observers on the ground.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, October 24, 2014 2:39 PM

Some people dare to take a challenge. They prepare well, they calculate the risk and then they just do it. Awesome.

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3D-printing may revolutionize medical education

3D-printing may revolutionize medical education | Pourquoi's innovation and creativity digest | Scoop.it

A kit of 3D-printed anatomical body parts could revolutionize medical education and training, according to its developers at Monash University.

Professor Paul McMenamin, Director of the University’s Centre for Human Anatomy Education, said the simple and cost-effective anatomical kit would dramatically improve trainee doctors’ and other health professionals’ knowledge and could even contribute to the development of new surgical treatments.

 

“Many medical schools report either a shortage of cadavers, or find their handling and storage too expensive as a result of strict regulations governing where cadavers can be dissected,” he said.

 

“Without the ability to look inside the body and see the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels, it’s incredibly hard for students to understand human anatomy. We believe our version, which looks just like the real thing, will make a huge difference.”

 

The 3D Printed Anatomy Series kit, to go on sale later this year, could have particular impact in developing countries where cadavers aren’t readily available, or are prohibited for cultural or religious reasons.

 

After scanning real anatomical specimens with either a CT or surface laser scanner, the body parts are 3D printed either in a plaster-like powder or in plastic, resulting in high resolution, accurate color reproductions.

 

Further details have been published online in the journal Anatomical Sciences Education.

References:Paul G. McMenamin, Michelle R. Quayle, Colin R. McHenry, Justin W. Adams, The production of anatomical teaching resources using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology, Anatomical Sciences Education, 2014, DOI: 10.1002/ase.14753D printed anatomy to mark a new era for medical training
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, July 23, 2014 4:22 AM

La impresión 3D también va a mejorar la manera en que nos formamos los profesionales sanitarios