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NextGen Donors and the New Golden Age of Philanthropy | Social Velocity

NextGen Donors and the New Golden Age of Philanthropy | Social Velocity | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Erika Harrison's insight:

Heads up: This is not your parents' philanthropy.

Great new blog post by Social Velocity on emerging research and trends in philanthropy. Nonprofits need to pay attention. Corporate giving too for that matter.

 

Key findings are that NextGen donors are:

*Focused on Impact.

*Giving Based on Values.

*Looking to Be Engaged.

*Paving Their Own Way.


Key facts nonprofit leaders need to embrace:

*Outcomes are here to stay. In order to compete for funding you must be able to prove the results of what you are doing, what change you are creating.  


*Giving has gone social. NextGen donors rely heavily on their social networks to make decisions, including their giving. 


*Donors are more than a checkbook. This next generation of donors doesn’t want to just write a check, have their name on a wall and be done with it. They want to really get to know the causes in which they invest.

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Positively Critical
Seek not to become people of success, rather seek to become people of value ~ Einstein
Reflections on civil society, constructive critical thinking and how we create value.
Curated by Erika Harrison
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A Simple Question but So Hard to Answer: What Is Success? - Leading for Social Good - The Chronicle of Philanthropy

A Simple Question but So Hard to Answer: What Is Success? - Leading for Social Good - The Chronicle of Philanthropy | Positively Critical | Scoop.it

http://philanthropy.com

Erika Harrison's insight:

"Half of the nonprofit consulting industry could probably pack up and go home if more nonprofits asked this question. Not for donors or reporters, but for themselves.  Ultimately it is a not just an organizational question but a deeply personal one.  Once you cut through all of the jargon about strategy, impact, metrics, etc., what exactly are you hoping to accomplish?  And how will you know when you’re done?"

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Science Reveals How the Brains of Social Justice Activists Are Different From Everyone Else's

Science Reveals How the Brains of Social Justice Activists Are Different From Everyone Else's | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
What's motivating someone to chain themselves to a tree?
Erika Harrison's insight:

"People who are more sensitive to the ideas of fairness and equity are driven by reason, not just passion, according to a recent University of Chicago study published in the Journal of Neuroscience".

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The Pitchforks Are Coming… For Us Plutocrats

The Pitchforks Are Coming… For Us Plutocrats | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Memo: From Nick Hanauer To: My Fellow Zillionaires

You probably don’t know me, but like you I am one of those .01%ers, a proud and unapologetic capitalist. I have founded, co-founded and funded more than 30 companies across a range of industries—from itsy-bitsy ones like the night club I started in my 20s to giant ones like Amazon.com, for...

Erika Harrison's insight:

"Some inequality is intrinsic to any high-functioning capitalist economy. The problem is that inequality is at historically high levels and getting worse every day. Our country is rapidly becoming less a capitalist society and more a feudal society. Unless our policies change dramatically, the middle class will disappear, and we will be back to late 18th-century France. Before the revolution".

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10 Scientific Ideas That Scientists Wish You Would Stop Misusing

10 Scientific Ideas That Scientists Wish You Would Stop Misusing | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Many ideas have left the world of science and made their way into everyday language -- and unfortunately, they are almost always used incorrectly. We asked a group of scientists to tell us which scientific terms they believe are the most widely misunderstood. Here are ten of them.
Erika Harrison's insight:

Important concepts for understanding scientific terminology.

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Watch: The 5 biggest scientific mysteries, according to Neil deGrasse Tyson

Watch: The 5 biggest scientific mysteries, according to Neil deGrasse Tyson | Positively Critical | Scoop.it

“My great fear is that we’ve in fact been visited by intelligent aliens,” he told Hayes. “But they chose not to make contact, on the conclusion that there’s no sign of intelligent life on Earth.”Tyson chats astrophysics and alien intelligence with Chris Hayes VIDEO

Erika Harrison's insight:

“My great fear is that we’ve in fact been visited by intelligent aliens,” he told Hayes. “But they chose not to make contact, on the conclusion that there’s no sign of intelligent life on Earth.”

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Chip Conley - Cultural Curiosity - NetImpact13 Keynote

"2013 Net Impact Conference Closing Keynote Session: Change Starts with an Idea featuring Chip Conley, Founder of Joie de Vivre Hotels & Head of Global Hospitality of Airbnb".

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William Rees // Part 1 of 3 // Why Degrowth?

Part 1 of 3 from the April 16th, 2014 Vancouver Degrowth Event Titled: Why degrowth? Dialogue on a pathways towards a smaller economy Video of William Rees' ...

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Beyond IQ: 5 Ways To Reframe Success And Smarts | FastCo Create

Beyond IQ: 5 Ways To Reframe Success And Smarts | FastCo Create | Positively Critical | Scoop.it

"Some of the most successful people were "ungifted," according to traditional measures of intelligence. Here, insight from Scott Barry Kaufman and his book,Ungifted, on reevaluating your intellectual strengths and weaknesses and assumptions".

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It's the end of the world as we know it... What now? CBC The Current March 31, 2014

It's the end of the world as we know it... What now? CBC The Current March 31, 2014 | Positively Critical | Scoop.it

Some who say we're doomed and others say we need to work faster on how we'll adapt to climate change. Our panel muses about our resilience, our ability to adapt and our ancestral track record as we ask: If it's the end of the world as we know it … What Now?

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What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets

What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck’s work on growth mindsets has dominated much of the attention around how students can influence their own learning. But there are other ways to help students tap into their own motivation, too. Here are a few other important mindsets to consider.
Erika Harrison's insight:

"Influencing how students view themselves as learners is challenging work. Students often won’t respond if a teacher just tells them how they should think — that creates defensiveness. Instead, a good tactic is to teach them some of the neuroscience around learning, including that the brain is malleable".

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Scared Of Failing? Ask Yourself These 6 Fear-Killing Questions

Scared Of Failing? Ask Yourself These 6 Fear-Killing Questions | Positively Critical | Scoop.it

Warren Berger, author of A More Beautiful Question, collected the provocative questions top designers, tech innovators, and entrepreneurs ask themselves to spark creativity.

Erika Harrison's insight:

“Instead of thinking about what you would do if you knew you wouldn’t fail,” Guillebeau writes, “maybe a better question is . . . What’s truly worth doing, whether you fail or succeed?”

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The Intellectual Snobbery of Conspicuous Atheism

The Intellectual Snobbery of Conspicuous Atheism | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Beyond the argument that faith in God is irrational—and therefore illegitimate
Erika Harrison's insight:

"The Age of Atheists will likely stay confined to certain intellectual circles: The casual philosopher, the dogmatic non-believer, the coffee-table book collector. But insofar as its argument represents a broader pathology in contemporary conversations about belief, this book matters. Most people form their beliefs and live their lives somewhere in the middle of the so-called "culture divide" that outspoken atheists and believers shout across. The more these shouters shout, the more public discourse veers away from the subtle struggle of the average person's attempt to be human".

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Philanthropy is another form of Investment

Philanthropy is another form of Investment | Positively Critical | Scoop.it

"With this landscape, and the investment options therein, new strategies emerge that make no sense when investing and philanthropy are two separate activities.  For example, in foundations, where 90% of the funding sits in the safety of S&P 500, Treasuries, etc., 5% is invested speculatively, and only 5% given away to fulfill the mission of the organization, impact investing can be used to empower all 100% of the dollars toward impact".

Erika Harrison's insight:

I imagine it's no accident the area representing impact investing on the graph resembles a green leaf.

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Why Right-Wingers Think the Way They Do: The Fascinating Psychological Origins of Political Ideology

Why Right-Wingers Think the Way They Do: The Fascinating Psychological Origins of Political Ideology | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Are left and right a feature (or bug) of evolution?
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The Baloney Detection Kit: Carl Sagan’s Rules for Bullshit-Busting and Critical Thinking

The Baloney Detection Kit: Carl Sagan’s Rules for Bullshit-Busting and Critical Thinking | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Necessary cognitive fortification against propaganda, pseudoscience, and general falsehood.

Carl Sagan was many things -- a cosmic sage,
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Do We Need a Social Innovation Taxonomy?

Do We Need a Social Innovation Taxonomy? | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
  As social innovation grows in popularity the inevitable questions about what we mean when we use the term crop up. How we define, categorize and utilize the language of social innovation may...
Erika Harrison's insight:

Big and Not-Big Social Innovation

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Russell Brand - Awakened Man

This video is not about Russell Brand at all - it is about the message and that message has never been more simple, it's LOVE. Trimmed from hours of Russel's inspiring, loving and pure truth interviews and talks....

Erika Harrison's insight:

Any of these clips viewed separately can sound like tangential rants, but edit them together and it becomes a truly powerful 11-minute stream of consciousness and awakening.

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Putting the Freeze on Global Warming | Moyers & Company | BillMoyers.com

Putting the Freeze on Global Warming | Moyers & Company | BillMoyers.com | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Two leaders of the climate change divestment campaign are urging institutions to break ties with the fossil fuel industry.
Erika Harrison's insight:

Bill talks with two leaders who helped inspire the new fossil fuel divestment movement that Tutu is encouraging. Ellen Dorsey is executive director of the Wallace Global Fund and a catalyst in the coalition of 17 foundations known as Divest-Invest Philanthropy. Thomas Van Dyck is Senior Vice President – Financial Advisor at RBC Wealth Management, and founder of As You Sow, a shareholder advocacy foundation.

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The Sharing Economy: It's more than we think | Vanessa Timmer | One Earth

The Sharing Economy: It's more than we think | Vanessa Timmer | One Earth | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
The sharing economy has the potential to transform society by reducing environmental impacts, and enhancing community resilience and economic opportunities.
Erika Harrison's insight:

"Though the Sharing Economy holds much promise for creating social innovations, it’s important to consider who is benefitting from these new models of sharing. The successful growth of sharing businesses like Airbnb and Lyft clearly indicate the economic value of the movement. What is less understood is the social benefits that are created by the Sharing Economy for vulnerable populations. One of the greatest aspirations of the Collaborative Economy is to form a more inclusive society. Monitoring the impacts of sharing on low-income groups can help realize this vision".

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Beyond Monocultures of the Mind - Vandana Shiva - Sages and Scientists 2013

Monocultures of the mind make us blind to biological and cultural diversity. They create scarcity while laying claim to increased productivity. They create conflict while laying claim to peace.

For ending hunger and poverty, violence and conflicts, we need to go beyond monocultures of the mind. We need to cultivate diversity, on the earth and in our mind. 

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Stop Accumulating Stuff And Start Accumulating Experiences

Stop Accumulating Stuff And Start Accumulating Experiences | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Could you spend a month and have bought nothing physical by the end of it?
Erika Harrison's insight:

"For a new value system to replace materialism, and be the answer to the problem of Stuffocation, it will have to solve all the problems that come with it--like pollution, overconsumption, and status anxiety. It should also take advantage of all the opportunities it contains--like the technologies that give us the benefits of access without the downsides of physical ownership.

 

It will have to appeal to everyone you would call a captain of consciousness in the 21st century – businesses, governments, you and me. It will have to provide profit for businesses, and jobs for people. It will need to produce taxable income, and a useful benchmark for governments. It should also satisfy our innate desires for happiness, meaning, and status".

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The Great Barrier Reef: an obituary

The Great Barrier Reef: an obituary | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is gathering in Yokohama, Japan, to explore the array of impacts climate change is having on the natural world. For one of Earth's natural wonders, the Great Barrier Reef, the situation is stark – emissions must be cut radically, and quickly, if the ecosystem is to survive
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The Culture of Permaculture

The Culture of Permaculture | Positively Critical | Scoop.it

Urban gardeners. Native seed-saving collectives. Ecovillage developments. What is the connection between these seemingly disparate groups? The ecological design system of permaculture is the common thread that weaves them into a powerful, potentially revolutionary—and evolutionary–movement.

Erika Harrison's insight:

Permaculture is a philosophy based on common ethics of sustainable cultures throughout history that have designed settlements according to nature’s patterns and lived within its bounds. It is taking form as a growing network of sites developed with the intention of regenerating local ecologies and economies. Permaculture strategies can be used by individuals, groups or nations to address basic human needs such as food, water, energy, and housing, and the movement has been building momentum exponentially for the past 40 years. As a species, humans are being called forth to evolve, using our collective intelligence to meet the challenges of the future. Yet if we are to survive our collective planetary crisis, we need to revisit history, integrating successful systems from sustainable cultures. To boldly confront our position on the brink of the earth’s carrying capacity and make change that incorporates the wisdom of the past can be truly [r]evolutionary.


Sustainable [R]evolution features the work of a worldwide network of visionaries, including journalists, activists, indigenous leaders and permaculturists such as David Holmgren, Vandana Shiva, Charles Eisenstein, Starhawk, Erik Assadourian, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, Albert Bates, and Geoff Lawton. This beautifully photographed collection of profiles, interviews, and essays features 60 innovative community-based projects in diverse climates across the planet.

 

Edited by anthropologist Juliana Birnbaum and award-winning activist filmmaker Louis Fox, it can be read as an informal ethnography of an international culture that is modeling solutions on the cutting edge of social and environmental change. The research presented in the book frames the permaculture movement as significant ally to marginalized groups, such as the urban poor and indigenous groups resisting the pressures of globalization. Sustainable Revolution uplifts and inspires with its catalog of dynamic cultural pioneers stewarding vibrant communities and bringing regenerative design strategies to the mainstream.

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Community Foundations: What It Takes to Become Dynamic Hubs of Local Capital - RSF Social Finance

Community Foundations: What It Takes to Become Dynamic Hubs of Local Capital - RSF Social Finance | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
by Don Shaffer
Community foundations—with their deep local ties, significant assets, and community benefit missions—are ideally positioned to play a leading role in solving our communities’ most profound and difficult challenges. Yet many are stuck …
Erika Harrison's insight:

"Community foundations—with their deep local ties, significant assets, and community benefit missions—are ideally positioned to play a leading role in solving our communities’ most profound and difficult challenges. Yet many are stuck in a pattern of disbursing only a small percentage of their assets in grants and investing the rest in traditional portfolios that don’t advance (and may even undermine) their mission.

 

What is preventing these anchor institutions from realizing their potential? What exactly is that potential, and how can community foundations shift to an impact investment strategy that really makes a difference to community success and resilience"?

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Nasa-funded study: industrial civilisation headed for 'irreversible collapse'?

Nasa-funded study: industrial civilisation headed for 'irreversible collapse'? | Positively Critical | Scoop.it
Nafeez Ahmed: Natural and social scientists develop new model of how 'perfect storm' of crises could unravel global system
Erika Harrison's insight:

The paper also lays out the actions needed for avoiding catastrophe: reduce income inequality and mindless consumption.

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'Make meaning and jump curves' - The art of innovation: Guy Kawasaki at TEDxBerkeley

“Innovation is the specific instrument of entrepreneurship … the act that endows resources with a new capacity to create wealth.” — Peter Drucker. Guy Kawasaki at TEDxBerkeley 2014: "Rethink. Redefine. Recreate." His talk is titled "The Art of Innovation."

Erika Harrison's insight:

Kawasaki presents these 11 points as the cornerstones for product innovation, though they can also apply to innovation more broadly.

 

1. Make meaning. Determine how you can change the world — to do something that is truly meaningful. Apple democratized computers. Google democratized information. eBay wanted to democratize commerce. These companies made meaning, and by making meaning, they also ended up making money.


2. Make mantra. Your mantra should be a three- to four-word mantra that explains why you make meaning. For example, I think Nike’s mantra should be “authentic athletic performance,” and eBay’s should be “democratize commerce.” My personal mantra is “empower people.” Bottom line: A mantra explains why you should exist.


3. Jump to the next curve. Too many companies duke it out on the same curve. There was an ice-harvesting industry in the 1880s. During the winter, companies would cut blocks of ice. Ice factories put them out of business because they weren’t limited to cold climates. Refrigerator companies, in turn, put ice factories out of business because of the added convenience of personal chillers, or PCs. True innovation occurs when you jump to the next curve — or better yet, invent the next curve.


4. Great products are DICEE: Deep, Intelligent, Complete, Empowering and Elegant.Deep means lots of features and power. Intelligent means the company understood your pain and what you needed. Complete means a company provides a satisfying total solution. Empowering means your product makes people better rather than fighting your customer. And Elegant means that your products are well-designed.


5. Don’t worry; be crappy. Don’t worry about shipping an innovative product with elements of crappiness. The first permutation of an innovation is seldom perfect — Macintosh, for example, didn’t have software (thanks to me), a hard disk (it wouldn’t matter with no software anyway), slots and color. If a company waits until everything is perfect, it will never ship, and the market will pass it by.


6. “Let a hundred flowers blossom.” I stole this from Mao Zedong. Innovators need to be flexible about how people use their products. Avon created Skin So Soft to soften skin, but when parents used it as an insect repellant, Avon went with the flow. Apple thought it created a spreadsheet/database/word-processing computer but came to find out customers used it as a desktop publishing machine. The lesson is to sow fields, not flower boxes, and to let a hundred flowers blossom.


7. Don’t be afraid to polarize people. Most companies want to create the holy grail of products that appeals to every demographic, socio-economic background and geographic location. To attempt to do so guarantees mediocrity. Instead, create great products that make segments of people very happy. And fear not if these products make other segments unhappy. The worst case is to incite no reactions at all, and that happens when companies try to make everyone happy.


8. Churn, baby, churn. I’m saying it’s OK to ship with elements of crappiness — I’m not saying that it’s OK to stay crappy. A company must improve version 1.0 and create version 1.1, 1.2, … 2.0. This is a difficult lesson to learn because it’s so hard to ship an innovation; therefore, the last thing employees want to deal with is complaints about their perfect baby. Innovation is a process, not an event.


9. Niche thyself. The holy grail of innovation is to create a product that is unique and valuable. When you do so, you make meaning, margin and history. If you’re an engineer, you make a product that’s unique and valuable. If you’re a marketing person, you communicate to the world that your product is unique and valuable.


10. Perfect your pitch. There are three keys to a perfect pitch: First, customize your introduction. You need to demonstrate to your audience you care enough to personalize your pitch. Second, sell your dream for your product by explaining how it can change lives. Stop using industry jargon and explain the benefits of owning your product. Third, use the 10-20-30 rules for slides on your presentation: 10 slides, 20 minutes and 30-sized font.


11. Don’t let the bozos grind you down. The bozos will tell you what you’re trying can’t be done, shouldn’t be done and isn’t necessary. Some bozos are clearly losers — they are easy to ignore. The rich, famous and powerful bozos are the dangerous ones because people think they are smart. However, maybe they were just lucky, and they cannot comprehend, much less embrace, the next curve.

 

Innovation is so easy to read (or write) about and so hard to do. These 11 points are the cornerstones of innovation, but your task comes down to not resting until you make meaning and jump curves.

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