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Teach the Key Ingredients for Leadership Success

Teach the Key Ingredients for Leadership Success | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Claudio Fernández-Aráoz, a world expert on hiring, did a study of C-level leaders who were fired. The conclusion: they were hired for their intelligence and business expertise, but fired for weakness in emotional intelligence – usually the social variety.


When I looked at competence studies done by companies to identify the skill sets of their outstanding performers – what sets top leaders apart from average – the vast majority fell in the emotional intelligence category.


With a fresh crop of college grads heading into a tight job market, I wish they had had help in developing their emotional intelligence skills during their studies. But with a very few exceptions colleges ignore this crucial skill set for success. Students acquire these abilities on their own time, and rather randomly, depending on happenstance.


Via Anne Leong, Wise Leader™, Roger Francis
David Hain's insight:

With such a focus today on teaching for exams, maybe we need an exam in leadership to get this kind of learning embedded?

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Tom Hood's curator insight, July 4, 2014 8:54 AM

Having just finished our fifth class of Leadership Academy for our emerging CPA leaders, this article resonated  with me. While the notion of EQ as a critical leadership quality is on point, I think it must be in the context of how leadership is changing in this hyper-connected, rapidly changing world. When we asked our emerging leaders to compare and contrast leadership across the ages, they identified the common traits we all know - vision, communication, passion, and authority. Yet when looking at the current state, they added words like collaborative, transparent, more communication,.

 

These skills include the ability to engage and inspire followers to a shared vision and action. The other critical piece is to 'know themselves' in a way they can be that authentic leader with their own unique style rather than trying to fit some standard leadership model that forces them to change. We do this with Strengths-Finders and Values to help them become self-aware.

 

Thus I see the idea of EQ to include specific group dynamics, collaboration, listening, and making your thinking visible to others. These skills can be taught and developed and we are seeing emerging leaders  able to apply these as they grow into the kind of future leaders we will need.

Robin Martin's curator insight, July 4, 2014 1:51 PM

Absolutely...however, students need to have the "grit'" and tenacity to survive as well as to thrive in this world. Some, if not most, of us Boomers learned this during our lifetimes, most likely the "hard way," so to speak.

 

Just being able to focus in the digital world for younger people (mainly younger children) has to be a challenge in itself! While the digital age is perfect for them to learn as quickly as their brains are moving, somewhere there has to be a delicate "balance" to keep them grounded. 

 

Yes, we do need to align the skill sets needed to survive and become great leaders with what we're teaching young children. I predict an education overhaul in the very near future! 

Marisol Araya Fonseca's curator insight, July 5, 2014 12:28 PM

Bring the real life to the classroom to shorten the gab between the classroom and their future lives outside the classroom.

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What Adolescents Really Need from Parents

What Adolescents Really Need from Parents | Positive futures | Scoop.it
As a parent of adolescents, I’ve often worried about their health and happiness. They seem to be under a lot of social and academic pressure, suggesting they need more guidance from me to help them get through. But how can I support their independence and autonomy while making sure they don’t fall through the cracks or become depressed or anxious?
To find out more about how parents can best help their budding teenagers, I spoke with Ron Dahl, a neuroscientist and professor of human health and development at the University of California, Berkeley.

Dahl, one of the leading experts on adolescent development, has spent years studying depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders in adolescence, using intervention studies and, more recently, fMRI technology to increase our understanding of what’s going on. His findings have helped uncover the neural underpinnings of adolescence and have led to some interesting discoveries about the role of social supports in teen life. They point the way toward helping our young teens get what they truly need during this very risky yet exciting time of life.
David Hain's insight:

Parenting adolescents - a subject close to my heart! Some useful framing in this article.

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People who love chocolate are more likely to be clever

People who love chocolate are more likely to be clever | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Good news for chocolate lovers: eating the sweet treat has been found to have a positive association with cognitive performance, according to a new study.

Published in the journal Appetite, researchers used data collected from a Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS), in which 968 people aged between 23 and 98 were measured for dietary intake and cardiovascular risk factors, as well as cognitive function.  

The researchers found that regularly eating chocolate was significantly associated with cognitive function “irrespective of other dietary habits”.
David Hain's insight:

That chocolate habit might be doing you some good! Now to find some cognition research on that red wine habit...

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6 Ways to use Neuroscience to Improve Your Team and Business

6 Ways to use Neuroscience to Improve Your Team and Business | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Neuroscience is the big buzzword flying around in business right now.  It is a perplexing subject unless you’re fully conversant with the terminology.   What is being shown is that getting your employees to use their brains in ways which help them engage, be motivated, thrive and create is the way forward.  This means considering new ways to tackle traditional systems or cultures in the workplace.   I don’t pretend to understand all of the science but I do understand how some of the applications should be used.   What follows is my take on the changes which will bring out the best in people, by using breakthrough findings in neuroscience.
David Hain's insight:

Useful primer on neuroscience.

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This scientist can hack your dreams

This scientist can hack your dreams | Positive futures | Scoop.it
What if we could peek inside our brains and see our dreams — or even shape them? Studying memory-specific brain cells, neuroscientist (and ex-hacker) Moran Cerf found that our sleeping brains retain some of the content we encounter when we're awake and that our dreams can influence our waking actions. Where could this lead us? "Neuroscientists are now giving us a new tool to control our dreams," Cerf says, "a new canvas that flickers to life when we fall asleep."
David Hain's insight:

Wow, even our dreams are not immune to the power of science these days. Not much left for hackers to crack!

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Lisa Marie Forsythe's curator insight, May 23, 2:25 PM

Dreams are a lot more than what we think...

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5 reasons city mayors want self-driving vehicles

5 reasons city mayors want self-driving vehicles | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Until recently, many people had reservations about the concept of driverless cars. Could they be trusted? Were they safe? Was it even realistic given the current design of most cities? While these questions are still important, we're now starting to focus on the benefits as much as the challenges. Forum research found that 58% of people said they were either likely or very likely to take a ride in a self-driving car.
David Hain's insight:

5 sound reasons to embrace drivers cars - they could change your world, also transform the world...

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How A Princess And A CEO Are Applying The VC Model To Philanthropy

How A Princess And A CEO Are Applying The VC Model To Philanthropy | Positive futures | Scoop.it
"It was overwhelming, actually," recalls Kate Roberts, CEO of the philanthropic initiative the Maverick Collective, of the emotions that flooded in when she gave birth to her daughter in 2011. As a senior vice president at the not-for-profit Population Services International (PSI), she knew the challenges women face all over the world, including gender-based violence and lack of access to contraception. And she knew that despite all the rhetoric about investing in women, just two cents of every development dollar actually goes toward programs for girls.

The following year, Roberts accompanied Her Royal Highness the Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway, a longtime HIV/AIDS activist and also a mother of a young daughter, on a visit to a PSI project in New Delhi. The two had met in passing at conferences but grew close as they toured the city’s slums and hospitals, meeting with women affected by HIV and tuberculosis. "We talked a lot about the need to put major resources behind girls and women," says Roberts. "We got very emotional about it."

They decided that if the current model for philanthropy wasn’t working to lift girls out of poverty, they needed to create something new, combining Roberts’s development and marketing experience—plus access to PSI’s 9,000 employees across 65 countries—with the crown princess’s international clout and track record of giving voice to those in need. They devised a strategy to enlist women (who were able to invest at least $1 million each) to run innovative pilot programs, though Roberts makes sure to point out that the organization "is not a club for rich women." The focus on private capital was strategic: Traditional funders typically need to see results before they’ll pour money into something. "Private money is less risk-averse," says the crown princess. This freedom would allow the collective to gamble on experimental ideas.
David Hain's insight:

Maverick change - created by women philanthropists. "Money doesn't create change - people do!"

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Harvard Study Reveals What Meditation Literally Does To Gastrointestinal (Bowel) Disorders 

Harvard Study Reveals What Meditation Literally Does To Gastrointestinal (Bowel) Disorders  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The hits just keep on coming when it comes to the health benefits of meditation. Research is now emerging that would justify implementing this practice within hospitals and schools (some already do) as well as including it in treatment recommendations for various diseases.

Not long ago, an eight week study conducted by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) determined that meditation literally rebuilds the brains grey matter in just eight weeks. It was the very first study to document that meditation produces changes over time in the brain’s grey matter. Now, they’ve released another study showing that meditation can have a significant impact on clinical symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).  The study showed that elicitation of the relaxation response (a physical state of deep rest that changes the physical and emotional responses to stress) is a very big help.
David Hain's insight:

Yet more evidence of the impact of mindfulness on wellbeing. Becoming pretty compelling...

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Guy Claxton on Why Your Mind Needs Your Body

Guy Claxton on Why Your Mind Needs Your Body | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Western Culture has long separated the mind from the body; the brain, has been privileged as the source of intellect, with the rest of the body annexed a
Via Steve Wilhite
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Why Do We Feel Awe?

Why Do We Feel Awe? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
News stories and social media posts inundate us every day with tips for greater happiness, health, and general well-being. But who has the time to fit them into our already packed schedules?
Recently, though, my research has led me to believe that one simple prescription can have transformative effects: look for more daily experiences of awe. This doesn’t require a trek to the mountains. What the science of awe is suggesting is that opportunities for awe surround us, and their benefits are profound.
David Hain's insight:

"Don't underestimate the power of goosebumps!" - Berkeley Greater Good. The importance of bringing some awe into your life! 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 12, 11:02 AM
Does it have to extraordinary to feel awe? Or, can we experience the extraordinary in the ordinary?
Ian Berry's curator insight, May 12, 6:54 PM
We can all be more childlike and less childish. Every day my wife and I and our dog Molly walk the same path (we are blessed with sand and sea, and bush and scrub!) Every day Molly finds something new because her curiosity knows no bounds. She reminds us daily that every moment has never happened before and therefore we cannot help but be in awe.
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The 4th Largest Economy In The World Just Generated 90 Percent Of The Power It Needs From Renewables

The 4th Largest Economy In The World Just Generated 90 Percent Of The Power It Needs From Renewables | Positive futures | Scoop.it
On Sunday, for a brief, shining moment, renewable power output in Germany reached 90 percent of the country’s total electricity demand.
That’s a big deal. On May 8th, at 11 a.m. local time, the total output of German solar, wind, hydropower, and biomass reached 55 gigawatts (GW), just short of the 58 GW consumed by every light bulb, washing machine, water heater and personal computer humming away on Sunday morning. See the graph below, courtesy Agora Energiewende, a German clean energy think tank. (It’s important to note that most likely, not all of that 55 GW could be used at the time it was generated due to system and grid limitations, but it’s still noteworthy that this quantity of power was produced.)
David Hain's insight:

Some case-based reflections on a green future, as practised in Germany now - HT @ReachScale.

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“Sesame Street” + IBM Watson = Personalized Learning

“Sesame Street” + IBM Watson = Personalized Learning | Positive futures | Scoop.it
 As children or adults, we all learn in different ways. Whether our learning styles are visual, auditory or kinesthetic, teachers tend to teach in the way they learn best. This is where technology, in this case Watson, can help by learning what is the best learning style for each student and then personalizing instruction for that style.  
David Hain's insight:

Will Artificial Intelligence do a better job than teachers? Seems we are about to find out.

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How To Charge The Trust Battery

How To Charge The Trust Battery | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Trust is ephemeral. Hard to describe, harder to quantify.

It is also not easy to talk about. And yet, every relationship – professional and personal – is enhanced when trust becomes an elemental force in that relationship.

Enter Tobi Luetke, the CEO of Shopify, an e-commerce software company. I was inspired by Tobi’s conversation with Adam Bryant, the NY Times columnist who pens the wonderfully practical Corner Office column in the Times’ Sunday Business Section. At Shopify, they talk about trust.
David Hain's insight:

@AchimNowak talking about trust. Definitely worth a minute of your time!

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Globalization & the New "Corpocracy" | The Ikeda Center for Peace, Learning & Dialogue 

Globalization & the New "Corpocracy" | The Ikeda Center for Peace, Learning & Dialogue  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Consider the following: 450 billionaires today own more wealth than half of all humanity. And think about this: the three wealthiest shareholders of Microsoft own more wealth than all the people living in Africa. Or this: Wal-Mart is bigger than 163 countries. GE is bigger than Israel or Finland.

Globalization is creating a new corpocracy—a worldwide nexus of financial markets and corporations that now dominates the world. There are over 45,000 corporations on the globe today, but the 200 largest companies rule, with sales comprising over 25% of the total GDP of the world. Financial institutions are especially important, and not just because the 100 largest banks control 21 trillion dollars in assets, about three-fourths of the world’s wealth. With over $1.5 trillion racing around the planet for maximum profit each day, the financial markets are the ultimate masters of the universe, controlling not only government but the corporations themselves. Corpocracy is about money making money, a departure from the days when the economy was driven by producing useful goods.
David Hain's insight:

The rise of  'Corpocaracy' - a 21C phenomenon that needs to be addressed!

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Stop Trying to Grow Influence. Grow this Instead.

Stop Trying to Grow Influence. Grow this Instead. | Positive futures | Scoop.it
You will never be a leader.

You won’t get that promotion. The bonus and salary increase you expect will be given to someone else. Your product won’t change the world. Your idea won’t go viral. Your organization will fade into history. The legacy you leave will be forgotten. And a generation from now no one will even know your name.

Be honest.

You’ve had these thoughts before. The voices in your head are relentless. It’s not competition that trips you up. It’s not the unexpected or unavoidable that bring you down. It’s the constant self-talk of unsatisfied desire, unrealized dreams, and unreasonable expectations.

At some point, every leader faces it. We struggle to increase our influence. We hope to enlarge our territory. You see it so clearly. Why can’t others?
David Hain's insight:

Working on capacity banishes fear, and ends up in performance. "Your capacity determines your reach. Grow capacity. Grow influence." - LeadChange Group

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The makers of Sesame Street are bringing quality education to refugee children

The makers of Sesame Street are bringing quality education to refugee children | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Sesame Street's beloved Muppets will soon help some of the most vulnerable children in the world.

A new partnership between Sesame Workshop, the brand's educational nonprofit, and global humanitarian aid organization International Rescue Committee (IRC) will allow the two groups to develop, distribute, and test educational resources and programs designed with young refugees in mind.

The initiative, which will be announced Monday at the first ever World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul, is still in its early stages. The first phase is to develop educational multimedia content that can reach children living in displaced or resettled communities through mobile devices, radio, TV and printed materials in engaging, enjoyable ways.

David Hain's insight:

Sesame Street initiative to bring education to humanitarian crisis young people. Excellent!

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How to go from good to great | London Business School

How to go from good to great | London Business School | Positive futures | Scoop.it
What turns a manager into a leader? Professor of Organisational Behaviour, Randall S Peterson, suggests some answers.
David Hain's insight:

Some key behaviours to practice leadership rather than management.

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Why do we want the latest gadgets? This is what brain science tells us

Why do we want the latest gadgets? This is what brain science tells us | Positive futures | Scoop.it
A neuroscientists looks at the reasons behind the success of brands like Apple, and how technology is changing our understanding of our basic needs.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, PhD
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Your brain does not process information and it is not a computer – Robert Epstein | Aeon Essays

We are organisms, not computers. Get over it. Let’s get on with the business of trying to understand ourselves, but without being encumbered by unnecessary intellectual baggage. The IP metaphor has had a half-century run, producing few, if any, insights along the way. The time has come to hit the DELETE key.
David Hain's insight:

What the brain does - and what it doesn't! An elegant rant challenging sloppy language.

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Ian Berry's curator insight, May 20, 6:23 PM
Worth reading the whole essay. "We are organisms, not computers" is the point. The future belongs to those who co-create and sustain harmony between humans and machines including VR and AI. I continually ask and encourage others to ask this question about technology How does this enhance the human experience?
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Stepping into Uncertainty

Stepping into Uncertainty | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Primatologist Isabel Behncke and neuroscientist Beau Lotto contemplate the significance of play in our everyday lives.
David Hain's insight:

Why you should play more!

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#HR 7 Things to Say When a Conversation Turns Negative

#HR 7 Things to Say When a Conversation Turns Negative | Positive futures | Scoop.it
A helpful list of replies and comebacks.
Via Fernanda Grimaldi, Ricard Lloria
David Hain's insight:

Nice mini conversation toolkit!

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Joe Boutte's curator insight, May 14, 7:21 AM
The ability to redirect a conversation to a more positive outcome is a key ability and foundational communications characteristic for everyday leaders. Changing the course of a conversation through thoughtful reframing creates common goals and leads to solutions and positive outcomes.  Note that it is a conversation, which should always be two-way traffic where intent listening by the leader helps overcome the challenges of negativity.
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Infographic: Millennials Believe In Life After Work

According to Deloitte, many millennials around the world are planning near-term exits from their employers. Many have expressed their belief that businesses have few motivations beyond profit and they would prefer to place their own values ahead of organizational goals. For millennials searching for new employment opportunities, a good work/life balance is their top priority in any future career. The reputation of a company and its leaders is not considered important by young workers today.
David Hain's insight:

What Millennials want out of life - and perhaps, what they are not getting enough of!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, May 13, 2:15 AM
Infographic: Millennials Believe In Life After Work
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Dan Pontefract Uncovers the Purpose Effect

Dan Pontefract Uncovers the Purpose Effect | Positive futures | Scoop.it

If Good Work is your job description, and getting stuff done for your organization, Great Work is about the work that has more impact, but also the work that has more meaning. It’s the work that lights you up. It’s your purpose. 

Today, I’m speaking to Dan Pontefract. He’s the author of Flat Army and his latest book is called The Purpose Effect. It’s an interesting take on what’s required to find your sweet spot, your true purpose in the work that you’ve done.

David Hain's insight:

The 3 types of purpose, and other meaningful stuff! From the excellent Dan Pontefract and Michael Bungay Stanier.

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Why feeling like a fraud can be a good thing - BBC News

Why feeling like a fraud can be a good thing - BBC News | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you feel inadequate or that you are likely to be "found out" at work, you're probably not alone. It's part of a phenomenon called the "impostor syndrome" and it's very common, writes journalist Oliver Burkeman.
"I have written 11 books but each time I think 'Uh-oh, they're going to find out now,'" the novelist Maya Angelou once said.
"I've run a game on everybody, and they're going to find me out."
Angelou was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and won five Grammys for her spoken recordings, plus a myriad other awards.
But the "impostor phenomenon" - sometimes known as impostor syndrome - had her firmly in its grip. Public acclaim didn't dent the feeling that, deep down, she was a fraud, who didn't have a clue what she was doing.
You've probably felt the same. Most of us have. Yet a crucial element of the impostor phenomenon is the sense that you're the only person to suffer.
So you may not find it reassuring to learn that Angelou felt it too.
"Sure," you tell yourself, "she thought she was a fraud - but I really am one. And any day now, I'll be rumbled."
David Hain's insight:

"If you're sufficiently self-aware to feel that you may be a fraud...you may well not be!" Good article on inner gremlins!

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Michelle Sales's curator insight, May 11, 10:33 AM

Research shows also that highly successful women suffer this most. It is helpful to focus on positive self talk and work on assertiveness and resilience. 

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When Taking Risks is Good for Teens

When Taking Risks is Good for Teens | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Teens take risks. Some will do drugs, drink to excess, shoplift, and worse—activities that studies show are associated with problems later in life, including depression and anxiety.
But risk-taking is part of growing up, too, helping teens to develop independence and identities—to start becoming adults. Risks help them to find out what they can do, and to gain insight into the meaning of their lives.
So, if risk-taking can be both bad and good, how can parents and other adults encourage positive risks, while discouraging more negative ones?
That’s the question at the heart of new studies by Eva Telzer, a neuroscientist at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She’s been looking at how the brain responds to risk-taking and how that shapes depression in adolescents—with some surprising results.
Instead of finding a clear relationship between thrill-seeking and depression, as other scientists have found, Telzer’s research finds a much more complicated interaction. Her studies show that teens who find pleasure in giving to others may be protected from developing depression, even if they are attracted to risk-taking.
David Hain's insight:

Very useful research into risk taking behaviour. Required reading for parents and young people.

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Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In my experience, though, most of today’s workers—and senior executives perhaps most of all—lack what they need, whether it’s meditation or a different approach, to balance and offset the demands of their “anywhere, everywhere” roles in today’s corporations. The famous hitter Ted Williams, at the conclusion of a long baseball season, used to go hunting and fishing to relax and recharge. Winston Churchill was an amateur painter who once said, “If it weren’t for painting, I couldn’t live. I couldn’t bear the strain of things.”

Most executives can’t disappear for long stretches to go fishing, and picking up painting sounds daunting. But they can use simple versions of proven meditation techniques to improve the quality of their lives, even if it’s only by increments. My purpose in this article isn’t to tell you whether, or how, to meditate; there are several flavors of meditation and I have only really ever tried the tradition of Vipassana.3 Instead, I will describe how it has helped me deal with three common challenges faced by leaders: email addiction, coping with disappointment, and becoming too insular.
David Hain's insight:

The many benefits of meditation!

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Joey-David Ovey's curator insight, May 2, 3:17 AM
Leadership, meditation and less attachment.