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7 Powerful Life Lessons We Can Learn From The Writer Who Died Young – Marina Keegan

7 Powerful Life Lessons We Can Learn From The Writer Who Died Young – Marina Keegan | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Untimely death is always tragic. When the promise of tomorrow is cut short, the one who passes away leaves their loved ones to pick up the pieces of their broken hearts and try to carry on with life. While this may be a major fear of just about everyone on the planet, there are powerful lessons that can be learned when it happens.

Here is one example. Her name was Marina Keegan

She was an aspiring writer who might have been able to be compared to someone like Maya Angelou one day. But Marina was killed in a car accident only 5 days after she graduated from Yale University. Words from her final essay in the Yale Daily News went viral after her untimely death: “We don’t have a word for the opposite of loneliness, but if we did, I could say that’s what I want in life.”

David Hain's insight:

On the day we mourn Maya Angelou, lessons from a shorter life of someone who perhaps might also change the world.

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Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In my experience, though, most of today’s workers—and senior executives perhaps most of all—lack what they need, whether it’s meditation or a different approach, to balance and offset the demands of their “anywhere, everywhere” roles in today’s corporations. The famous hitter Ted Williams, at the conclusion of a long baseball season, used to go hunting and fishing to relax and recharge. Winston Churchill was an amateur painter who once said, “If it weren’t for painting, I couldn’t live. I couldn’t bear the strain of things.”

Most executives can’t disappear for long stretches to go fishing, and picking up painting sounds daunting. But they can use simple versions of proven meditation techniques to improve the quality of their lives, even if it’s only by increments. My purpose in this article isn’t to tell you whether, or how, to meditate; there are several flavors of meditation and I have only really ever tried the tradition of Vipassana.3 Instead, I will describe how it has helped me deal with three common challenges faced by leaders: email addiction, coping with disappointment, and becoming too insular.
David Hain's insight:

The many benefits of meditation!

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Brain's 'atlas' of words revealed - BBC News

Brain's 'atlas' of words revealed - BBC News | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Scientists in the US have mapped out how the brain organises language.
Their "semantic atlas" shows how, for example, one region of the brain activates in response to words about clothing and appearance.
The researchers found that these maps were quite similar across the small number of individuals in the study, even down to minor details.
The work, by a team at the University of California, Berkeley, is published in the journal Nature.
David Hain's insight:

One of the last uncharted frontiers is gradually being decoded - to the benefit of us all!

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3 recommendations for narrowing the gender divide

3 recommendations for narrowing the gender divide | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Time and time again it has been proven that more diverse organisations not only outperform those which are less diverse, but are also most likely to attract and retain the most talented professionals. I’ve previously outlined the three most impactful of these business benefits in this Viewpoint blog.
In addition to these benefits of diversity, there’s also the positive link between women in the workplace and a country’s economic growth. Despite this, globally women are not paid or rewarded equal to their male colleagues and remain underrepresented in the workplace, as well as proportionally less represented in senior roles.
David Hain's insight:

The benefits of diversity - and the strugle to realise them!

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Ten career mistakes to avoid | Hays

Ten career mistakes to avoid  | Hays | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Just one career mistake is all it can take to have a damaging impact on your professional ambitions. To avoid tripping up, recruiting experts Hays has put together a list of the ten most common career mistakes.

According to Susie Timlin, Global Director of People & Culture at Hays Talent Solutions, avoiding these mistakes, while keeping your focus and passion for your work, will help you to go much further in your career, whilst ensuring you get enjoyment out of your day-to-day working life.
David Hain's insight:

I've done most of these derailers at some point or another - how about you?

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Poor character or poor judgment? - Karin Sebelin - Coachings for Writers + Entrepreneurs -

Poor character or poor judgment? - Karin Sebelin - Coachings for Writers + Entrepreneurs - | Positive futures | Scoop.it
There is a difference between poor character and poor judgment. Almost every person is guilty of poor judgment. A poor judgment can happen. It is like it is! We all have our weak moments, when we succumb to baser impulses.

As a leader it is important to understand the difference between character and judgment.
David Hain's insight:

Start of a useful free resource from @karinsebelin.

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Understand the Five Components of Stress

Understand the Five Components of Stress | Positive futures | Scoop.it
When it comes to workplace stress, I’ve got both bad news and good news.

The bad news? If your work stresses you, you’re not alone. A 2013 study by Harris Interactive for Everest College showed that 83% of American workers experience stress about their jobs. That was an increase from 73% in 2012. Low pay topped the list of work stressors, with unreasonable workload, annoying coworkers, and commuting also named as major sources of stress. The World Health Organization has estimated that stress costs American businesses up to $300 billion a year.

The good news? You can manage your response to stress. As with many things, the first step to taming stress is to understand it. With that awareness, you can choose strategies to reduce stress factors and improve how you handle the stress you face.
David Hain's insight:

Stress 101 - useful tips for something we are all prone to experience.

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Roger Francis's curator insight, April 5, 5:29 AM

Stress 101 - useful tips for something we are all prone to experience.

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Wearables in the workplace, some interesting research

Wearables in the workplace, some interesting research | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We have recently been working with some very bright students enrolled in the Masters in Management course at the London School of Economics (LSE) who have being studying the emerging field of wearable technology, including some of the issues mentioned above. Their research includes valuable insight into the market for wearables, typical applications, peoples’ attitudes towards these technologies, as well as incentives to encourage adoption and potential barriers to widespread acceptance.

The report is available for download here and is a fascinating read that draws interesting conclusions that every organisation today really ought to be aware of.
David Hain's insight:

New report on the positive power and potential of wearables.

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, April 4, 11:58 AM

New report on the positive power and potential of wearables.

Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, April 4, 12:05 PM

New report on the positive power and potential of wearables.

Liliana Luna Gomez's curator insight, April 5, 3:10 AM

New report on the positive power and potential of wearables.

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The surprising habits of original thinkers

The surprising habits of original thinkers | Positive futures | Scoop.it
How do creative people come up with great ideas? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant studies "originals": thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. In this talk, learn three unexpected habits of originals — including embracing failure. "The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they're the ones who try the most," Grant says. "You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones."
David Hain's insight:

Learing to fail well is perhaps the best chance of becoming successful!

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They Bet Their Life

They Bet Their Life | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Nenad Cuk doesn’t plan on dying or getting injured any time soon, so buying life and disability insurance is a waste of money, he said.

When he started his job nearly a year ago, the 27-year-old Internet marketing specialist turned down the chance to spend about $10 a month on policies offered at his company, DaVinci Virtual Office Solutions in Salt Lake City. Cuk said he had his reasons: He is single, doesn’t live a wild lifestyle and wants to put as much money as he can into his company 401(k) plan instead.

“I mean, what are the chances of me dying early?” Cuk said. Plus, “I’m a pretty safe person. I’ve never had anything broken in my life. I take calculated risks, and I’m not into any crazy outdoor activities.”

Cuk said he plans to get married and have kids at some point. Maybe it would make sense to look at life and disability insurance then. “Maybe when I get into my 40s, I may look at it more seriously,” Cuk said. “By then I hope to be a little more settled in my life.”
David Hain's insight:

How relevant is insurance to you? Worth reviewing?

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, April 2, 10:10 AM

How relevant is insurance to you? Worth reviewing?

ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 4:53 AM

How relevant is insurance to you? Worth reviewing?

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In Defense of Introverted Children 

In Defense of Introverted Children  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We don’t need more medication for children; we need less homogeneity and more acceptance of differing norms. Whether they are quiet or loud, introverted or extroverted, every child deserves to occupy a space created by him or her and for him or her. They do not need drug companies to turn them into replicas of the adult population, many of whom are also medicated. Allowing children to be who they need to be is difficult and takes time. And, of course, time is money. Sticking a pill down a child’s throat is quick and easy. But who ever said the easy road was the right one, especially when it comes to raising healthy children?
David Hain's insight:

Let kids be themselves rather than seeking to find unhealthy 'nromalisation'! A strong parental plea that makes sense.

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 5:05 AM

Let kids be themselves rather than seeking to find unhealthy 'nromalisation'! A strong parental plea that makes sense.

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How can we use big data to improve patient outcomes? | EY Better Working World

How can we use big data to improve patient outcomes? | EY Better Working World | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Electronic records, health insurance claims, real-time monitoring by connected mobile devices. More medical information is being generated and gathered today than ever before. It’s a trend that’s set to continue.

With aging populations putting increasing pressure on health services, and healthcare costs rising worldwide, working out how to make healthcare more efficient is also an increasingly pressing concern.

The question is how to use this data to drive the most effective healthcare outcomes. We need to move beyond the big data hype to big data results.

There are many regulatory and technological challenges to overcome to maximize the benefit of medical data analytics, from incompatible systems to privacy and intellectual property concerns. And if you come to the wrong conclusions, it truly can be a matter of life or death.

Demonstrating the real-world value of healthcare analytics on improving both efficiency and patient outcomes is vital to win over governments, healthcare organizations and individual patients.
David Hain's insight:

Harnessing analytics to make a better human world!

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 5:07 AM

Harnessing analytics to make a better human world!

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Complaining Is Terrible for You, According to Science

Complaining Is Terrible for You, According to Science | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Why do people complain? Not to torture others with their negativity, surely. When most of us indulge in a bit of a moan, the idea is to "vent." By getting our emotions out, we reason, we'll feel better.

But science suggests there are a few serious flaws in that reasoning. One, not only does expressing negativity tend not to make us feel better, it's also catching, making listeners feel worse. "People don't break wind in elevators more than they have to. Venting anger is...similar to emotional farting in a closed area. It sounds like a good idea, but it's dead wrong," psychologist Jeffrey Lohr, who has studied venting, memorably explained.

OK, so complaining is bad for your mood and the mood of your friends and colleagues, but that's not all that's wrong with frequent negativity. Apparently, it's also bad for your brain and your health. Yes, really.
David Hain's insight:

Science provides evidence for the "No Complaining" Rule!

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Stephanie Gilchrist's curator insight, March 29, 1:23 PM

Science provides evidence for the "No Complaining" Rule!

ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 5:13 AM

Science provides evidence for the "No Complaining" Rule!

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The Hidden Price of Mindfulness Inc.

The Hidden Price of Mindfulness Inc. | Positive futures | Scoop.it

With so many cashing in on the meditation craze, it’s hard not to wonder whether something essential is being lost. If mindfulness can be bought as easily as a pair of Lululemon yoga pants, can it truly be a transformative practice that eases the troubled mind? It’s a question as slippery as a Zen koan.

There’s no doubt that as mindfulness has gone mainstream, plenty of people have used the technique to achieve peace of mind, greater self-awareness, perhaps even more compassion. Yet at the same time, a race to the bottom seems to be underway.

David Hain's insight:

Distinguishing between mindfulness as a life practice and a cash cow peddling fads is very important. Good article!

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 28, 7:23 AM

Distinguishing between mindfulness as a life practice and a cash cow peddling fads is very important. Good article!

ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 5:20 AM

Distinguishing between mindfulness as a life practice and a cash cow peddling fads is very important. Good article!

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Globalization & the New "Corpocracy" | The Ikeda Center for Peace, Learning & Dialogue 

Globalization & the New "Corpocracy" | The Ikeda Center for Peace, Learning & Dialogue  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Consider the following: 450 billionaires today own more wealth than half of all humanity. And think about this: the three wealthiest shareholders of Microsoft own more wealth than all the people living in Africa. Or this: Wal-Mart is bigger than 163 countries. GE is bigger than Israel or Finland.

Globalization is creating a new corpocracy—a worldwide nexus of financial markets and corporations that now dominates the world. There are over 45,000 corporations on the globe today, but the 200 largest companies rule, with sales comprising over 25% of the total GDP of the world. Financial institutions are especially important, and not just because the 100 largest banks control 21 trillion dollars in assets, about three-fourths of the world’s wealth. With over $1.5 trillion racing around the planet for maximum profit each day, the financial markets are the ultimate masters of the universe, controlling not only government but the corporations themselves. Corpocracy is about money making money, a departure from the days when the economy was driven by producing useful goods.
David Hain's insight:

The rise of  'Corpocaracy' - a 21C phenomenon that needs to be addressed!

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First impressions, handshakes are key to women in leadership

First impressions, handshakes are key to women in leadership | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Attention businesswomen: Want to be more successful in the workplace? Don't worry so much, and master the perfect handshake.

Such was the advice of presenters at a women's leadership conference on Wednesday that drew 310 attendees to the Cox Convention Center. Oklahoma City University's Meinders School of Business hosted the seventh annual event, which was presented by the Chickasaw Nation.

Nancy Parsons, CEO of Tulsa-founded and now Texas-based CDR Assessment Group, said studies show men and women are basically equal in leadership energy, calmness and emotions.

“But under pressure, men dominate and women tend to move away and not speak up,” she said.
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A Matter of Perspective

A Matter of Perspective | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We all know it, but sometimes the realisation eludes us: perspective is a limiting thing. We are surrounded by walls of our own making. Constrained by our experience of the everyday, fooled into believing that the things we know to be true from our own experience are the shared experience of everyone, or the sum total of experience available.
David Hain's insight:

Reframing is such an important capability in life and work, @julianstodd!

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The PERMA Model: Bringing Well-Being and Happiness to Your Life

The PERMA Model: Bringing Well-Being and Happiness to Your Life | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We all want to be happy. When we're happy, we're productive, we're good at building meaningful relationships with those around us, and... we feel great!

However, happiness is a notoriously difficult thing to pin down, and by focusing on it too intensely, we can end up feeling unfulfilled.

In this article we'll look at the PERMA Model. This helps us think about what we need to do to flourish – and be really happy as a result!
David Hain's insight:

PERMA - a useful frame work for assessing and acting upon your capacity to flourish.

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You Need to Practice Being Your Future Self

You Need to Practice Being Your Future Self | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s a familiar story: You’re busy all day, working non-stop, multitasking in a misguided attempt to knock a few extra things off your to-do list, and as the day comes to a close, you still haven’t gotten your most important work done.

Being busy is not the same as being productive. It’s the difference between running on a treadmill and running to a destination. They’re both running, but being busy is running in place.
David Hain's insight:

You're busy, but are you busy on the current to-do list or busy thinking about developing skills for the future?

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Carl Jung: “All the contents of our unconscious are constantly being projected into our surroundings….”

Carl Jung: “All the contents of our unconscious are constantly being projected into our surroundings….” | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Just as we tend to assume that the world is as we see it, we naïvely suppose that people are as we imagine them to be. . . .
All the contents of our unconscious are constantly being projected into our surroundings, and it is only by recognizing certain properties of the objects as projections or imagos that we are able to distinguish them from the real properties of the objects. . .
Cum grano salis, we always see our own unavowed mistakes in our opponent.
Excellent examples of this are to be found in all personal quarrels.
Unless we are possessed of an unusual degree of self-awareness we shall never see through our projections but must always succumb to them, because the mind in its natural state presupposes the existence of such projections.
It is the natural and given thing for unconscious contents to be projected.
David Hain's insight:

Projection - worth learning about, we all do it!

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, April 4, 11:58 AM

Projection - worth learning about, we all do it!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 4, 12:43 PM

Projection - worth learning about, we all do it! Carl Jung wrote about education and I am just getting into that work.

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Here’s The Advice The Atari Founder Gave To A Young Steve Jobs

Here’s The Advice The Atari Founder Gave To A Young Steve Jobs | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Naysaying has always been an epidemic of sorts. The majority of people, if asked to vote, would vote on mediocrity. You might wonder why someone would freely choose mediocrity. The simple answer is this: they can't see far enough into the future to imagine anything besides what they already know. Thus, they are stuck in the present without vision or the motivation to leave it. To break this mold, you need a strong sense of conviction, even amid a sea of naysayers. That’s the advice I gave Steve Jobs when he worked for me many years ago, and it’s the same advice I give young entrepreneurs today.  Here are two ways to ensure your conviction is in tact as you grow your business.
David Hain's insight:

The necessity of conviction! Good enough for Steve Jobs...

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The Great Positive Psychology Conspiracy: A Response to Shaw

The Great Positive Psychology Conspiracy: A Response to Shaw | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Tasmin Shaw's accusations around Positive Psychology are dissected in this cutting response where the truth is anything but Skinner, torture and conspiracy.
David Hain's insight:

A force for good, or a sinister conspiracy of psychologists? Read about the Positive Psychology wars here and make up your own mind.

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, April 2, 11:18 AM

A force for good, or a sinister conspiracy of psychologists? Read about the Positive Psychology wars here and make up your own mind.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 4:40 AM

A force for good, or a sinister conspiracy of psychologists? Read about the Positive Psychology wars here and make up your own mind.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 4:41 AM

A force for good, or a sinister conspiracy of psychologists? Read about the Positive Psychology wars here and make up your own mind.

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Why negative thoughts are actually good for well-being

Why negative thoughts are actually good for well-being | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Negative thoughts are actually vital to our well-being and mental health, according to recent studies.

In an article for Scientific American, psychotherapist Tori Rodriguez pulls together some of this research, and explains the role of emotions such as anger and sadness in the human experience. Ignoring or suppressing these negative thoughts can have a range of unwanted effects on our mental health and well-being.

“Unpleasant feelings are just as crucial as the enjoyable ones in helping you make sense of life's ups and downs,” she explains. Without the negative we cannot evaluate our experiences, or experience true sense of satisfaction.
David Hain's insight:

Bad feelings can be good signals - but you need to acknowledge them and act!

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 5:01 AM

Bad feelings can be good signals - but you need to acknowledge them and act!

Ariana Amorim's curator insight, April 4, 11:27 AM

Bad feelings can be good signals - but you need to acknowledge them and act!

Tessa Dagnely's curator insight, April 5, 3:33 AM

Bad feelings can be good signals - but you need to acknowledge them and act!

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Before You Scroll, Try This Mindful Social Media Practice

Before You Scroll, Try This Mindful Social Media Practice | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The sheer volume and instant nature of digital media means that when we log in, we are drinking from a fire hose of emotional stimulus. We can be anywhere in the world and be met by friends’ posts that trigger joy, resentment, sadness, laughter, grief, jealousy, and more—all within moments. None of us, adults or children, are wired to take in that much emotional content at once without reacting.
Research also reveals that social rewards and punishments feel the same online and off. If someone interacts with us in a positive way online, we get the same neurochemical rewards in our brain as we would in person. When we (or our children) are rejected or ignored online, we get the same feeling of rejection as we would in person. More interestingly, the sense of emotional attack activates the same part of the brain as physical attack does. Emotional pain is just as painful, just as real, as physical pain, whether it comes from the virtual world or not.
So, can we teach ourselves, and the young people around us, to approach social media feeds with mindfulness, even occasionally?
David Hain's insight:

SoMe mindfulness - contradiction in terms or a useful practice to learn?

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, April 1, 1:37 AM

SoMe mindfulness - contradiction in terms or a useful practice to learn?

ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 5:11 AM

SoMe mindfulness - contradiction in terms or a useful practice to learn?

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How many of these leadership traits have you mastered?

How many of these leadership traits have you mastered? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Being an effective leader means mastering skills from five key themes, a new study has found.

Dr Sunnie Giles, an organizational scientist and leadership development consultant, undertook research to find out the traits needed to be an effective leader. Her research involved 195 leaders across 15 countries.

Participants were asked to identify the 15 most important leadership competencies from a list of 74. The top 10 were then grouped into five main themes that all leaders should aspire to achieve.

“These five areas present significant challenges to leaders due to the natural responses that are hardwired into us,” Dr Giles notes.

She goes on to say that with “deep self-reflection and a shift in perspective… there are also enormous opportunities for improving everyone’s performance by focusing on our own.”
David Hain's insight:

Some authoritaive research on the leadership skills needed for the future.

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Skip Gole's curator insight, March 31, 7:06 PM

Some authoritaive research on the leadership skills needed for the future.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 5:15 AM

Some authoritaive research on the leadership skills needed for the future.

Andrew J Gibson's curator insight, April 4, 9:03 AM

Some authoritaive research on the leadership skills needed for the future.

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This is why Finland has the best schools

This is why Finland has the best schools | Positive futures | Scoop.it
"Our mission as adults is to protect our children from politicians," one Finnish childhood education professor told me. "We also have an ethical and moral responsibility to tell businesspeople to stay out of our building." In fact, any Finnish citizen is free to visit any school whenever they like, but her message was clear: Educators are the ultimate authorities on education, not bureaucrats, and not technology vendors.

Finland delivers on a national public scale highly qualified, highly respected and highly professionalised teachers who conduct personalised one-on-one instruction; manageable class sizes; a rich, developmentally correct curriculum; regular physical activity; little or no low-quality standardised tests and the toxic stress and wasted time and energy that accompanies them; daily assessments by teachers; and a classroom atmosphere of safety, collaboration, warmth and respect for children as cherished individuals.
David Hain's insight:

Finnish education - worth studying!

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 30, 1:39 AM

Finnish education - worth studying!

ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 5:17 AM

Finnish education - worth studying!