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How to spot emotional intelligence in the people you interview

How to spot emotional intelligence in the people you interview | Positive futures | Scoop.it
'Emotional intelligence' is a phrase which has been bandied about a great deal over the last few years. But what is it? Why should you employ people with it? And, most importantly, how can you tell who has it?
David Hain's insight:

Useful interview 101 for recruiters and candidates.

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Path to Happiness Revealed in New Book

Path to Happiness Revealed in New Book | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“All of us seem to have three important life goals,” he said. “One is the goal of being good at doing something. I call this goal mastery. Second is having a sense of belonging, deep intimate connection with at least one other person in this world. Third is the sense of autonomy, or control over your own life.”

Caught up in achieving those goals, many people focus on the behaviors they believe will make them happy, rather than on happiness itself. “We don’t behave in a way that prioritizes happiness in our lives," Raghunathan said. "We instead prioritize other things, like value of money, fame, status or beauty, and so on.”

David Hain's insight:

How to be happy!

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Everyone is born creative, but it is educated out of us at school

Everyone is born creative, but it is educated out of us at school | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Young children fizz with ideas. But the moment they go to school, they begin to lose the freedom to explore, take risks and experiment.

We spend our childhoods being taught the artificial skill of passing exams. We learn to give teachers what they expect. By the time we get into industry, we have been conditioned to conform. We spend our days in meetings and talk about “thinking outside the box”. But rarely do we step outside it.

The sad truth is that schools were never designed to produce creativity. Not many people are aware of it, but the education systems in the US and many other countries are based on the 19th-century Prussian model. Children were taught to obey, not to challenge or think creatively. That’s why you stand to attention when the teacher walks into the class. It’s why from the US to China, children wear uniforms.

The system worked well for blue-collar workers – people who clocked in at factories and stood on production lines making things such as automobile engines. But in a world driven by search engines, the system is a busted flush. We must teach creativity at school as a matter of urgency.
David Hain's insight:

If we always do what we always did, the world will remain fractured and dysfunctional! A plea to educate our kids to develop their natural creativity!

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Meet the top 100 business visionaries creating value for the world

Meet the top 100 business visionaries creating value for the world | Positive futures | Scoop.it

At Business Insider, we believe capitalism can and should be a force for good. With this inaugural edition of Business Insider 100: The Creators, we are celebrating leaders who embody this spirit.

Many rankings focus only on those who have achieved great financial success. Our CEO Henry Blodget sums up the drawbacks of such a focus:

"The more money you make, the implication is, the better and more successful you are. We believe this cheapens the mission and sense of purpose that many great business leaders bring to their companies and products. And it certainly undersells their inspiring accomplishments."

Over the course of several months, we scoured the business landscape for inventive leaders making bold moves to create value for four constituencies: shareholders, employees, consumers, and society.We found companies from around the world, both public and private, across many industries. We considered not only what they have created, but how. We consulted a variety of databases, including Glassdoor to gauge employee sentiment and Wealth-X to chart noteworthy philanthropic missions.

David Hain's insight:

Read about people trying to make a positive dent in the universe!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, June 17, 4:56 PM
There'll be a lot more of these purpose and people driven businesses as the dinosaur just for profit businesses die out. 
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We have hugely underestimated people’s need for social connection at work

We have hugely underestimated people’s need for social connection at work | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Why is social rejection painful?

Why have we evolved to find social exclusion painful? What purpose does it serve? We are mammals and through our first few days and years of life we would not survive if there wasn’t someone taking care of us and providing food, shelter and warmth. As babies we are acutely aware of the need for protection by others. This need stays with us throughout life, albeit less overtly.

Social Cconnection is part of the SPACES model (Self-esteem, Purpose, Autonomy, Certainty, Equity and Social Connection) as outlined in the last article. Causing us to want to be part of the group, is one of the brain’s methods of protecting us.

Neuroscience shows that our brains are very sensitive to rejection.
Back out on the savannah we were far more likely to survive if we were part of a tribe than trying to fend for ourselves.
David Hain's insight:

Our human need for SPACES! The power and pain associated with social connection quantity and quality, and why it's important!

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Consciousness and the Quantum: Surprising New Evidence

Consciousness and the Quantum: Surprising New Evidence | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Since it began in 1994, the Science of Consciousness conference in Tucson AZ, has become the world’s largest consciousness-focused conference. Founded by philosopher David Chalmers and anesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff, its popularity and prestige reflects the growing academic recognition of the mystery presented by the conscious mind. Among the diverse views of its attendees and speakers, there is a decidedly growing openness toward deeper views of the mind. For many, including its founders, the question of consciousness may even penetrate to the heart of our scientific ontology. In recent years, scientists exploring the controversial terrain of psychic anomalies, like precognition and mind-matter interaction, have become a growing part of the discussion. This year IONS chief scientist Dean Radin gave a fascinating talk detailing the surprising findings of his prize-winning experiments exploring the relationship between mind and the quantum world. This one’s not to be missed.
David Hain's insight:

How science and spirituality are meeting on the path to knowledge! Fascinating!

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Let's Talk About Emotions - Lead With Giants Coaching

Let's Talk About Emotions - Lead With Giants Coaching | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“ Learning to talk about emotions is important for self-awareness. It’s also important for connecting with others, building trust, and partnering for success.”
Via Dan Forbes
David Hain's insight:
Very useful graphic on the emotional spectrum, courtesy of @DanJForbes at #LeadWithGiants
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Christiane Windhausen's curator insight, June 13, 6:02 AM
Was für eine Vielfalt an Gefühlen... Sie verleihen unseren Erfahrungen einen einzigartigen Geschmack - mit Bewusstsein genossen entfaltet sich aus ihnen ein stimmiges Handeln.
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The Importance of Sadness - Mindful

The Importance of Sadness - Mindful | Positive futures | Scoop.it
What if I told you that the way to change the world was not to be bold, resolute, brilliant, or even compassionate? What if I told you that the way to change the world was to be sad?

It sounds so improbable. When we think of those who have taught us the most about meaningful change, we think of people who are very, very brave, say, Martin Luther King, Mahatma Gandhi, the Dalai Lama. Unwavering. Deep. Devoted to others and willing to die for what they believe, quite literally.

How do you get to be such a person?

Well, I have no idea, but I would put money on the idea that the ground, path, and fruition of their lives is sadness.

When you look out at this world, what you see will make you very, very sad. This is good. You are seeing clearly. Genuine sadness gives rise, spontaneously, naturally, completely, to the wish—no, the longing—to be of benefit to others. When your wish to help is rooted in love (i.e. sadness), it is effective. There is no question.
David Hain's insight:

Are you channeling your sadness - or just wallowing in it? It's a powerful force for change!

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Christiane Windhausen's curator insight, June 12, 10:49 AM
Wir können nur um das trauern, was wir lieben. Und nur um etwas kämpfen, das uns am Herzen liegt. Deshalb liegt in der Trauer so eine große Kraft...
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How to Be an Optimal Human

How to Be an Optimal Human | Positive futures | Scoop.it
What does it take to be an optimal human being?

Throughout history there has been much speculation. For Aristotle, the highest human good was eudaimonia. For Carl Rogers, it was the "fully functioning person". For Abraham Maslow, it was "self-actualization". For Erik Erickson, it was wisdom and integrity. For Erich Fromm, it was about having a "being" orientation (in which you value personal growth and love) instead of  a "doing" orientation ( in which you value material possessions and status).

But are these theories right? Over the past 30 years or so, a number of contemporary psychologists have experimentally tested various aspects of these theories, and we are starting to get a clearer picture of those who seem to be well-integrated, thriving human beings.* Here I will offer some science-informed prescriptions, in the hopes that it helps you in your own journey toward greater health, growth, and happiness.
David Hain's insight:

Scientific advice on how to maximise your human potential.

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Siemens CEO Joe Kaeser on the Next Industrial Revolution

Siemens CEO Joe Kaeser on the Next Industrial Revolution | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you don’t bridge the societal divide, you’re going to go nowhere with Industrie 4.0 or the Internet of Things or anything else a lot of techies and companies are talking about. That’s something that leaders of companies had better think about. They need to ask themselves, “How do I deal with the digital divide, the societal divide? How do I make sure that I bring people along and make a meaningful contribution to society?”
David Hain's insight:

Are Siemens showing the way to a new future with Industrie 4.0? Check out what the CEO says.

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Unique Habits of Ridiculously Likeable People

Unique Habits of Ridiculously Likeable People | Positive futures | Scoop.it
When I speak to smaller audiences, I often ask them to describe the most likeable people they have ever worked with. People inevitably ignore innate characteristics (intelligence, extraversion, attractiveness, and so on) and instead focus on qualities that are completely under people's control, such as approachability, humility, and positivity.

These qualities, and others like them, describe people who are skilled in emotional intelligence (EQ). TalentSmart research data from more than a million people shows that people who possess these skills aren’t just highly likeable, they outperform those who don’t by a large margin. Ninety percent of top performers have high EQs, people with high EQs make $29,000 more annually than people with low EQs, and a single-point increase in your EQ adds $1,300 to your salary. I could go on and on.

Being likeable is under your control, and it’s a matter of emotional intelligence. Unlike innate, fixed characteristics, such as your intelligence (IQ), EQ is a flexible skill that you can improve with effort.
David Hain's insight:

You could do worse than focus on your likability skills!

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The Science Of Isolation: How A Lack Of Friends Can Destroy Your Health

The Science Of Isolation: How A Lack Of Friends Can Destroy Your Health | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Perhaps the most compelling evidence that friendships affect longevity comes from the ongoing Harvard Study of Adult Development. Since 1938, researchers have been following 724 men, tracking their physical health as well as social habits.

Robert Waldinger, the study's current director, said in his recent TED Talk,

The clearest message that we get from this 75-year study is this: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier. Period.

Socially disconnected people are, according to Waldinger, “less happy, their health declines earlier in midlife, their brain functioning declines sooner, and they live shorter lives than people who are not lonely.”

Lest we think having 500 Facebook friends might offer some protection, Waldinger warns,

It's not just the number of friends you have, and it’s not whether or not you’re in a committed relationship, it's the quality of your close relationships that matters.
David Hain's insight:

Don't let friendships starve to death! Science suggests that will affect your own health...

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Can robots help your business be more human? | EY Better Working World

Can robots help your business be more human? | EY Better Working World | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Everyone knows that robots can help on a production line or in warehouses. But they also have a history of filling jobs previously done by people.

Fears of this kind arose after publication in 2015 of the best-selling book Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future. More recently, the Annual Report of the White House and the Council of Economic Advisers warned that millions of low-paying jobs are at risk of being automated out of existence.

But despite these warnings, Martin Weis, EMEIA Robotics Leader, EY, says that Robotic Process Automation (RPA) could be welcomed by the very people whose jobs may seem most at risk from its introduction. RPA is the software that allows automation of back-office manual tasks. It’s the future of many administrative functions and is set to enable office staff to automate routine tasks by themselves using common automation tools, thereby freeing up their capacity for higher-value work.

“RPA removes repetitious but labor-intensive work, like large-scale manual data entry, and enables people to instead focus on what matters,” Weis says. 
David Hain's insight:

The robots are coming! But it's not all bad news if you are alive to the possibilities they will generate!

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4 Brilliant Things That Happen When We PAUSE

4 Brilliant Things That Happen When We PAUSE | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you are a modern-age professional, we expect you to be self-aware and reflect. At its best, this self-awareness is present in every moment. You engage with another person, and you are at the same time aware of the quality of your engagement and the choices you make. I call this ability double-tracking. In the moment, and watchful of the moment, all at once.

Reflection, however, tends to happen in a pause. The pause is the moment in-between active engagement. Often only milliseconds long. But whoa – what glorious things happen in a pause.
David Hain's insight:

Pressing the pause button purposefully! Pause for 2 minutes to read this insightful stuff from @AchimNowak!

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Joey-David Ovey's curator insight, June 5, 12:33 PM
In an age when we talk too much, pausing becomes so powerful.
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Don't Let this Relationship Undermine Your Success

Don't Let this Relationship Undermine Your Success | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Megan approached me as soon as I left the stage.

Karin, I’m so with you on this not losing your soul thing… I resonated with everything you said… but for me it was the reverse.
I wasn’t losing my soul at work, I was finding it.
You see my boyfriend was always tearing me down. Or worse, acting like everything I was accomplishing was no big deal.
I would come home from work so excited, but the minute I started sharing my day, he made me feel like crap… like I was stupid to care that much.
I really love my job and I’m good at it. I know I’m making a difference.
My manager started really paying attention to what I was doing. Seeing my potential. Investing in me. Encouraging me. Giving me opportunities.
My confidence was growing.
And that felt good.
When I tried to explain all that to my boyfriend  he would roll his eyes.
I tried to talk to my mom, but she said maybe I was a workaholic.
She cares about me and wanted my relationship to work, so she took his side.
But one day it hit me.
He was scared of my success and my new-found confidence.
I tried to help him understand for a long, long time. I encouraged him in his career too.
I finally had to leave.
I feel like I’ve regained my soul.
I’m so much happier.

Been there. Amen sister.

David Hain's insight:

The power, and empowerment, of 'confident humility'. Good advice from @LetsGrowLeaders!

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There’s a way to train our brains to cope with stress that changes chemistry “as much as any antidepressant”

There’s a way to train our brains to cope with stress that changes chemistry “as much as any antidepressant” | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Ian Robertson, a cognitive neuroscientist at Trinity College Dublin and author of the upcoming book ‘The Stress Test: How Pressure Can Make You Stronger and Sharper,” says that, while too much stress can be debilitating, a moderate amount is extremely good for the mind.
He explains that stress causes the brain to secrete a chemical called noradrenaline. The brain doesn’t perform at its best with too little or too much of this chemical. But “there’s a sweet spot in the middle where if you have just the right amount, the goldilocks zone of noradrenaline, that acts like the best brain-tuner.”
David Hain's insight:

You're going to get stress - neuroscience suggests ways to learn how to make it your friend!

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‘Invisible Influence’: What Really Shapes Our Decisions

‘Invisible Influence’: What Really Shapes Our Decisions | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Knowledge@Wharton: What are the factors that go into determining whether social influence will make us want to, for example, buy the same car as our neighbor, versus buy a different one? Or make us want to work harder, versus give up?

“Merely biking with someone else, for example, makes you bike faster…. Others can help us do things that we might not do otherwise.”

Berger: I’d have to give you a long answer for all of it. But some simple things are, first, others often provide information. When we’re uncertain about what to do, we often look to others. That leads us, often, to the same thing. Yet at the same time, we want to see ourselves as different. Particularly in American culture, we like to see ourselves as special snowflakes — like my dad, buying the blue BMW rather than the gray one.

Maybe we pick the same car, because we know it’s a good car, because others have bought it. But we pick a different color, because colors allow us to feel different. So we’re similar and different at the same time. We’re optimally distinct.

Or in terms of motivation, for example. Others can motivate us, except when they are too much better than we are. If we compare ourselves to someone who’s much better, much faster than we are, sometimes it causes us to give up. We say, “Well, there’s no way I’m going to reach that standard, or that score, or that level of performance. They are so much better than I am that I’m not going to try anymore.” It’s really about understanding the subtle differences of social comparisons, and understanding the situations people are in, that helps us figure out which way it goes.
David Hain's insight:

Understanding the influence of others and its impact on us - better decisions probably follow...

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How Staying CALM Gets You the WIN!

How Staying CALM Gets You the WIN! | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you’re a tennis geek like me you know who she is. 21. Rising US tennis star, in spite of a spate of injuries. Had a great 2015 and is having an equally fine 2016. Made it to the final in Rome, the round of 16 at the Paris Open, heading for Wimbledon.

Madison Keys has worked with 4 coaches within the span of a year. That’s a lot of coach-switching. She is thriving with her current coach, Thomas Hogstedt.  What insight, you wonder, is Keys gaining from Hogstedt?

The biggest thing isn’t the confidence so much as just being calm on the court, Keys states in the Wall Street Journal (5/27/2016), and knowing that if things aren’t going perfectly I can figure it out. I don’t have to hit 70 winners in order to figure out how to win a match.

The C-Suite Coach in me grins from ear to ear. There are moments when a day at work can feel like a string of hard-hitting volleys, and a win doesn’t look like the sort of win we envisioned.
David Hain's insight:

Great coaching advice from @AchimNowak - it won't just help your tennis!

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Buddhist Meditation is Relaxing with the Truth

Buddhist Meditation is Relaxing with the Truth | Positive futures | Scoop.it
As a species, we should never underestimate our low tolerance for discomfort. To be encouraged to stay with our vulnerability is news that we definitely can use. Sitting meditation is our support for learning how to do this. Sitting meditation, also known as mindfulness-awareness practice, is the foundation of bodhichitta training. It is the home ground of the warrior bodhisattva.

Sitting meditation cultivates loving-kindness and compassion, the relative qualities of bodhichitta, which could be defined as completely awakened heart and mind. It gives us a way to move closer to our thoughts and emotions and to get in touch with our bodies. It is a method of cultivating unconditional friendliness toward ourselves and for parting the curtain of indifference that distances us from the suffering of others. It is our vehicle for learning to be a truly loving person.

Gradually, through meditation, we begin to notice that there are gaps in our internal dialogue. In the midst of continually talking to ourselves, we experience a pause, as if awakening from a dream. We recognize our capacity to relax with the clarity, the space, the open-ended awareness that already exists in our minds. We experience moments of being right here that feel simple, direct, and uncluttered.
David Hain's insight:

Why meditation is difficult, yet potential of huge importance! The human condition...

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5 Terrible Habits That Hold You Back From Success

5 Terrible Habits That Hold You Back From Success | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“ Ditch these 5 bad habits today, before they sabotage your successful future.”
Via Bobby Dillard
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A Surprisingly Easy Way To Control Your Anger

A Surprisingly Easy Way To Control Your Anger | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Research into anger management -  “Aggression reduction is less a matter of movement type or social constellation than a matter of need satisfaction and personal fulfillment. In other words, sport and exercise are able to reduce aggression, particularly in cases where participants experience movements or tasks as satisfying and enjoyable.”

In plain-speak, exercise can reduce your anger if you find the activity satisfying and enjoyable.

If you want to reduce your anger, get yourself involved in an exercise that has movements you enjoy doing.

David Hain's insight:

Often angry? Science says take more exercise!

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The Science of the Story

The Science of the Story | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Research finds that stories shape our behavior in other ways that can help us to thrive.
Study after study after study finds that stories are far more persuasive than just stating the facts. For example, one found that a storytelling approach was more effective in convincing African-Americans at risk for hypertension to change their behavior and reduce their blood pressure. A study of low-performing science students found that reading stories of the struggles of famous scientists led to better grades. A paper published last year found that witnessing acts of altruism and heroism in films led to more giving in real life.
Indeed, stories actually seem to trigger the neurochemical processes that make certain kinds of resource-sharing possible. This biological activity can lead to profound behavioral changes, including costly acts of altruism.
David Hain's insight:

Stories can move us like little else. Now science is revealing why...FYI @kdietz, thanks for the inspiration!

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Three Keys to Connecting with Others

Three Keys to Connecting with Others | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We need human connection in both our personal and our professional lives. Almost everything that is accomplished is made possible through relationships. Since it is nearly impossible to succeed all alone, here are three keys to really connecting with others.
David Hain's insight:

Unlock human connections to thrive. 3 deceptively simple steps here.

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Are the Rich More Lonely?

Are the Rich More Lonely? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Can money buy happiness? One way to explore this question is to ask whether money buys the constituents of happiness—and there’s no better-researched or more powerful constituent than social connections.
Yet even for this question, about money’s link to social connections, there is no clear-cut answer. Two new studies offer conflicting evidence, one suggesting that people with higher incomes spend less time socializing, and another suggesting that they feel less lonely. What’s actually going on here? 
David Hain's insight:

Research shows hung jury on money and happiness verdict!

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How Will You Measure Your Life?

How Will You Measure Your Life? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Editor’s Note: When the members of the class of 2010 entered business school, the economy was strong and their post-graduation ambitions could be limitless. Just a few weeks later, the economy went into a tailspin. They’ve spent the past two years recalibrating their worldview and their definition of success.

The students seem highly aware of how the world has changed (as the sampling of views in this article shows). In the spring, Harvard Business School’s graduating class asked HBS professor Clay Christensen to address them—but not on how to apply his principles and thinking to their post-HBS careers. The students wanted to know how to apply them to their personal lives. He shared with them a set of guidelines that have helped him find meaning in his own life. Though Christensen’s thinking comes from his deep religious faith, we believe that these are strategies anyone can use. And so we asked him to share them with the readers of HBR.
David Hain's insight:

How decisions about allocating your personal time, energy and talent shape your life! From the great Clayton Christensen.

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Five Mindfulness Trainings

Five Mindfulness Trainings | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The five mindfulness trainings are an expression of the five precepts, the core of Buddhist ethics, and offer a down-to-earth method of practicing mindfulness in daily life. As Thich Nhat Hanh wrote in his book Good Citizens, “The five mindfulness trainings are offered without dogma or religion. Everybody can use them as an ethics for their life without becoming Buddhist or becoming part of any tradition or faith. You are just yourself, but you try to make a beautiful life by following these guidelines.”
David Hain's insight:

A way to live based on spirituality and wisdom, as practised by Thich Nhat Hanh!

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