Positive futures
Follow
Find
17.9K views | +5 today
 
Rescooped by David Hain from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
onto Positive futures
Scoop.it!

Why Americans Are the Weirdest People in the World

Why Americans Are the Weirdest People in the World | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Joe Henrich, Steven Heine and Ara Norenzayan are shaking up psychology and economics with their view of how culture shapes human thought and behavior.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating research on cultural paradigms, with counter intuitive conclusions.

more...
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 10, 2013 6:27 AM

IN THE SUMMER of 1995, a young graduate student in anthropology at UCLA named Joe Henrich traveled to Peru to carry out some fieldwork among the Machiguenga, an indigenous people who live north of Machu Picchu in the Amazon basin. The Machiguenga had traditionally been horticulturalists who lived in single-family, thatch-roofed houses in small hamlets composed of clusters of extended families. For sustenance, they relied on local game and produce from small-scale farming. They shared with their kin but rarely traded with outside groups.



While the setting was fairly typical for an anthropologist, Henrich’s research was not. Rather than practice traditional ethnography, he decided to run a behavioral experiment that had been developed by economists. Henrich used a “game”—along the lines of the famous prisoner’s dilemma—to see whether isolated cultures shared with the West the same basic instinct for fairness. In doing so, Henrich expected to confirm one of the foundational assumptions underlying such experiments, and indeed underpinning the entire fields of economics and psychology: that humans all share the same cognitive machinery—the same evolved rational and psychological hardwiring.

Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, March 10, 2013 8:43 AM
Yes David, these studies are always quite interesting, whether one agrees or not with them.
Belinda MJ.B's curator insight, March 10, 2013 10:15 AM

The growing body of cross-cultural research that the three researchers were compiling suggested that the mind’s capacity to mold itself to cultural and environmental settings was far greater than had been assumed. The most interesting thing about cultures may not be in the observable things they do—the rituals, eating preferences, codes of behavior, and the like—but in the way they mold our most fundamental conscious and unconscious thinking and perception.

Positive futures
Let's make the future better!
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The habit that will consistently make you more powerful at work

The habit that will consistently make you more powerful at work | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Faster doesn’t necessarily mean better. With patience, we move forward by slowing down.
 
In a demanding and competitive world, it is easy to get caught up with the “do it yesterday” mentality. However, when we live at 100 miles per hour, we often miss what is going on in the present.

When we try to do things in a rush, we are usually destined to fail from the start — something I learned from my own mistakes. Faster doesn’t necessarily mean better.
David Hain's insight:

“The strongest of all warriors are these two — Time and Patience" ~ Tolstoy, HT @faisal_hoque

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

New Age Networking: how Millennials build and sustain relationships

New Age Networking: how Millennials build and sustain relationships | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We live in a complex world dominated by new technologies; a multitude of social media platforms; fast emerging trends and technologies pivoted around the digital space, the environment, geography, culture, consumer trends, gender diversity, and different belief systems. 

In Australia, this landscape is ever-changing, and is progressively being dominated by the younger (‘Millennial’) generation, who appears more capable and adaptable to survive in this tech-driven environment. 

So how do the Millennials position themselves in this space amongst their peers and in the public, and how do they go about developing and sustaining their relationships to achieve their goals and objectives in life and at work ? How do they use technology as their key weapon to survival  ? 
David Hain's insight:

Fast, aligned, social - how to develop your network with Millennials.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Could a new wave of talking therapies replace CBT?

Could a new wave of talking therapies replace CBT? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
When the government first declared it was taking the nation’s mental health problems seriously by increasing access to therapy, there was applause all round.  And for the last four years since the launch of its Increased Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) in 2011, problems such as depression, anxiety, phobias or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have tended to be referred by GPs for a course of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or CBT. However, as another £600 million is earmarked for improving mental health services, many experts are calling for a move away from a one-size-fits-all model of therapy, arguing that more modern hybrids of CBT are more effective as they are based more on brain science.
David Hain's insight:

Brain science leading to the development of new therapies.  Is CBT getting less effective over time?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

2016
Find Your Superpower

2016<br/>Find Your Superpower | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Agility and Resilience, as defined by most companies, leaders, and change experts, ain’t gonna cut it. This is your wake-up-call: Welcome to your way-out-of-your-comfort-zone future!
Agility and Resilience are too wimpy for what you are about to face. The amount of disruption you will experience during the next year will overpower most normal people’s efforts. (e.g., FastCo on next 20 years and the Internet of Things, HBR on the Future, The World in 2025 by Singularity University, PWC on the Future of Work, Jensen Group on Future of Work, Pacific Standard on the Future of Work.) You will need to find and tap into a superpower to get through it all!
David Hain's insight:

Choose your super power for next year from this pretty good list of ten by Bill Jensen, @simpletonbill. 4 & 6 look best for me!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Creating Boards for the Future

Creating Boards for the Future | Positive futures | Scoop.it
With the world of business changing so rapidly, boards need greater agility and members from a wider diversity of backgrounds. Less, or unconventionally, experienced executives are a good option.

When appointing Board members, organisations have traditionally sought candidates with a specific skill set from a similar background; generally people with previous CEO experience who have managed an IPO or saved a company from a managerial crisis or the threat of bankruptcy. In today’s rapidly transforming business environment, however, this shared experience can be a hindrance and it is companies led by a Board of diverse genders, knowledge, abilities, personalities, nationalities and career paths, which are more likely to thrive.
David Hain's insight:

Boards will be diverse and different in the near future - the dinosaurs will not always rule the earth!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

7 TED Talks on generosity

7 TED Talks on generosity | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s the giving season. And thus, we give you these great talks on the hows, whys and whats of generosity
David Hain's insight:

Givers gain! Some great TED talks on why and how.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

60 Countries Host Tolerance Workshops to +Compassion • Six Seconds

60 Countries Host Tolerance Workshops to +Compassion • Six Seconds | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Six Seconds created Talents for Tolerance, a week of workshops and gatherings inspired by the United Nations International Day for Tolerance. Conducted by volunteers, the free events highlighted ways we can forge bonds of common purpose even when there is conflict.  Finding real tolerance in ourselves can transform difficult relationships. As the week wrapped up, hundreds of emails and photos began streaming in from all over the world. Here are some highlights of those reports. May they inspire you as they inspired  me.
David Hain's insight:

In a week where the news was full of conflicts, tens of thousands of people in 60 countries attended tolerance workshops 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How bad experiences in childhood lead to adult illness — Donna Jackson Nakazawa — Aeon Essays

New findings in neuroscience, psychology and immunology tell us that the adversity we face during childhood has farther-reaching consequences than we might ever have imagined. Today, in labs across the country, neuroscientists are peering into the once-inscrutable brain-body connection, and breaking down, on a biochemical level, exactly how the stress we experience during childhood and adolescence catches up with us when we are adults, altering our bodies, our cells, and even our DNA.

Emotional stress in adult life affects us on a physical level in quantifiable, life-altering ways. We all know that when we are stressed, chemicals and hormones can flush our body and increase levels of inflammation. That’s why stressful events in adult life are correlated with the likelihood of getting a cold or having a heart attack.

But when children or teens face adversity and especially unpredictable stressors, they are left with deeper, longer‑lasting scars. When the young brain is thrust into stressful situations over and over again without warning, and stress hormones are repeatedly ramped up, small chemical markers, known as methyl groups, adhere to specific genes that regulate the activity of stress‑hormone receptors in the brain. These epigenetic changes hamper the body’s ability to turn off the stress response. In ideal circumstances, a child learns to respond to stress, and recover from it, learning resilience. But kids who’ve faced chronic, unpredictable stress undergo biological changes that cause their inflammatory stress response to stay activated.
David Hain's insight:

Science explains why we have to look after our young people better. They will be old people one day, so let's help them be more functional old people!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Science Of Why Scarcity Makes Us More Creative

The Science Of Why Scarcity Makes Us More Creative | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The rise of mass consumption has driven worldwide economic growth for decades. But does it help our creative growth?

According to a new study, the answer is no. When we stop buying new things, we look at what we already have in new ways and come up with new uses for products we own. In other words, scarcity drives creativity. When we aren't surrounded with ready-made solutions to problems, we have no trouble coming up with our own.
David Hain's insight:

How to thrive creatively when resources are scarce.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Buckminster Fuller on the Paris Massacre, Politics, Guns & the Survival of the Human Species

Buckminster Fuller on the Paris Massacre, Politics, Guns & the Survival of the Human Species | Positive futures | Scoop.it
"Never forget, no matter how overwhelming life's challenges and problems seem to be, that one person can make a difference in the world. In fact, it is always because of one person that all the changes that matter in the world come about. So be that one person."
David Hain's insight:

Introduction to the concept of livingry. Be a global citizen!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

FastCompany.com: What Does Authenticity Really Mean? - Bill George

FastCompany.com: What Does Authenticity Really Mean? - Bill George | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Authenticity is a hot word in leadership discussions. The modern workplace is more informal and less hierarchical than in the past. Command-and-control management doesn’t fly withpeople hired for their creative brainpower. They want leaders who inspire them, and give them reasons for working beyond a paycheck.

But all this requires a nuanced understanding of what "authenticity" should mean. In a business context, it doesn’t mean the "be yourself" phrase that probably pops into your mind first. For evidence of this, consider that many of Donald Trump’s supporters praise him for what they view as authenticity. He says what he thinks. He doesn’t seem to care what other people think of that. Yet business leaders emulating this approach might quickly find themselves in trouble. "Being authentic is much more than ‘being yourself,’" says Gareth Jones, coauthor of Why Should Anyone Work Here?: What It Takes to Create an Authentic Organization. "If you want to be a leader, you have to be yourself—skillfully."
David Hain's insight:

Doing authenticity - authentically - is a secret sauce for success. Don't fake it - practise!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Liberation for $500. Becoming the CEO of You.

Liberation for $500. Becoming the CEO of You. | Positive futures | Scoop.it
"When you cannot find a job, create one.” John Hope Bryant, founder, Operation HOPE

People keep telling me, "John, I cannot find a job with this big Fortune 500 company, or that big Fortune 500 company."  I remind them that while big companies do a lot of important things right - from incredibly important aspects of GDP, to American competitiveness and global growth -- hiring lots of people as a growth strategy is not one of them.  That my friends happens to be the role of entrepreneurs, small business and start ups.  Most job growth comes from start ups, shoot ups, entrepreneurs and small businesses in years 3 through year 7.

Half of all jobs in America are 100 employees or less, and 70% of all jobs in America are 500 employees or less. 99% of all jobs in the 12th largest economy in the world -- Los Angeles -- are companies with 100 employees or less.  

In so many ways, we are looking for love in all the wrong places.
David Hain's insight:

Introducing Operation HOPE from John Hope Bryant! Join the movement to be the CEO of you!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

A neuroscience researcher reveals 4 rituals that will make you happier

A neuroscience researcher reveals 4 rituals that will make you happier | Positive futures | Scoop.it
You get all kinds of happiness advice on the internet from people who don't know what they're talking about. Don't trust them.

Actually, don't trust me either. Trust neuroscientists. They study that gray blob in your head all day and have learned a lot about what truly will make you happy.

UCLA neuroscience researcher Alex Korb has some insights that can create an upward spiral of happiness in your life.

Here's what you and I can learn from the people who really have answers:
David Hain's insight:

How to train your brain into an upwards spiral and make yourself feel better!  Neuroscience backed.

more...
Tom Wojick's curator insight, February 2, 8:17 AM

It's not the "bad" or unpleasant feelings aren't instructive, its getting caught in them. This advice helps to understand the value or message of the unpleasant feeling and to move on.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Do you work for one of the 25 best companies in Britain?

Do you work for one of the 25 best companies in Britain? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Travel company Expedia has been named the best place to work in the UK, according to a ranking of employee satisfaction across companies with more than 1,000 employees.
Expedia was praised by staff for its generous compensation package, inclusive work environment and good company ethics.
Google, which took the crown last year, fell to eighth position this year's list put together by jobs website Glassdoor, based on employee insight and feedback given to the site over the past year.
David Hain's insight:

Best place to work? Only one of last years top 10 is still there, and they've dropped 7 places.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Six stereotypes about men and women that are scientifically true

Six stereotypes about men and women that are scientifically true | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Gender stereotypes have made numerous headlines around the world recently. First there was an Israeli finding that men are categorically not from Mars and women not from Venus; then there was the earth-shattering backlash from academics in Norway, who found that men are better at assembling IKEA trolleys than women.

So what should we believe? It's a minefield out there, but here to clear things up are six gender stereotypes scientifically proven (by at least one person with a BSc, we promise) to be true: 
David Hain's insight:

The myths and truths surrounding gender stereotyping, with sources.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The question that education can't afford to ignore

The question that education can't afford to ignore | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The challenge for Pearson is one that I expect resonates with many other organisations around the world. We may each describe it a little differently, and the outcome will be different, but the equation is the same.

How can we do more – and better – and most often do it with the same or less? In our case, how can we double the amount of really deep, high value learning in our societies at no extra total cost?
David Hain's insight:

Pearson CEO on why making quality education accessible and affordable is critical for the planet!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Art of Hosting
Scoop.it!

How Your Brain Perceives Time (and How to Use It to Your Advantage)

How Your Brain Perceives Time (and How to Use It to Your Advantage) | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We might not be able to create more time when we need it most—like when a deadline is approaching—but we can use the understanding of how we perceive time to our advantage.

Via F. Thunus
David Hain's insight:

Time is arguably our most precious resource - learn to use it wisely!

more...
F. Thunus's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:34 AM

Yes, it is of topic :-) But I still like it.

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience explains: why do we help others?

Neuroscience explains: why do we help others? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Sometimes when there are terrible things happening, it is easy to forget that people do nice things for others all the time. People help others through volunteering, charity and just random acts of kindness. This doesn't just happen when it is someone you know or even someone in the same neighbourhood or company.

Advertisement
People are nice to others even when they are not part of their social group. The proportion of people reporting that they donate to charity in a typical month increased during 2012/13 to 57% - up from the 55% in 2011/12. This represents an estimated total amount donated to charity by adults in the UK in 2012/13 of £10.4 billion.

We often talk as if people are self-interested; more interested in their own wellbeing over the wellbeing of others. The numbers for charitable donations alone call that belief into question before we even begin to look at volunteering, great neighbours and other acts.
David Hain's insight:

Turns out, science says, that helping others is enlightened self-interest!

more...
Colm Mcgill's curator insight, December 4, 2015 8:05 AM

Sometimes when there are terrible things happening, it is easy to forget that people do nice things for others all the time. People help others through volunteering, charity and just random acts of kindness

#peopletogether #life

Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

An ordinary person becomes a torturer with surprising ease — Shane O’Mara

What would it take for an ordinary person to torture someone else – perhaps electrocute them, even to the point of (apparent) death? In possibly the most famous experiments in social psychology, the late Stanley Milgram of Yale University investigated the conditions under which ordinary people would be willing to obey instructions from an authority figure to electrocute another person. The story of these experiments has often been told, but it is worth describing them again because they continue, more than 40 years on and many successful replications later, to retain their capacity to shock the conscience and illustrate how humans will bend to the demands of authority.
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating article on human behaviour! Why Torture Doesn’t Work: The Neuroscience of Interrogation

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things

The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Most people are in the pursuit of happiness. There are economists who think happiness is the best indicator of the health of a society. We know that money can make you happier, though after your basic needs are met, it doesn't make you that much happier. But one of the biggest questions is how to allocate our money, which is (for most of us) a limited resource.

There's a very logical assumption that most people make when spending their money: that because a physical object will last longer, it will make us happier for a longer time than a one-off experience like a concert or vacation. According to recent research, it turns out that assumption is completely wrong.
David Hain's insight:

Experiences, not material things, deliver happiness - and create stories! How do you spend your budget?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Hain from Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

The World's Most inspirational People

The World's Most inspirational People | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Inspiration has many faces, spans centuries, and lives big and small, as Raconteur discovered in a survey of over 2,000 readers and contemporary figures.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 30, 2015 11:31 PM

We all know what it feels like to have a “lightbulb” moment – that lightning-quick strike of momentary inspiration that plants the seed of genius and sends us racing to the whiteboard. But the feeling of sustained inspiration – a lifelong link to a particular point of reference that moors us, guides us, reminds us of what we might aspire to and what we can achieve – is something much deeper, and much greater.


As it turns out, inspiration has many faces. It spans many centuries. It covers all walks of life, and lives big and small.


Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

A short intro to the Studio School

A short intro to the Studio School | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We started with two schools. That's grown this year to about 10. And next year, we're expecting about 35 schools open across England, and another 40 areas want to have their own schools opening -- a pretty rapid spread of this idea. Interestingly, it's happened almost entirely without media coverage. It's happened almost entirely without big money behind it. It spread almost entirely through word of mouth, virally, across teachers, parents, people involved in education. And it spread because of the power of an idea -- so the very, very simple idea about turning education on its head and putting the things which were marginal, things like working in teams, doing practical projects, and putting them right at the heart of learning, rather than on the edges.
David Hain's insight:

Meet the Studio School, where small teams of kids learn by working on projects that are, "for real."  Great idea from Geoff Mulgan!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How the current world transformations will affect your life ?

How the current world transformations will affect your life ? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Information technologies are growing exponentially, bringing humans to interact into a decentralized way, and organized in a network.
These revolutions affect today’s traditional pyramidal organization of society. Institutions and organizations are shaked by the shift of power that is occuring.
We need to think critically about how much Artificial intelligence is gonna rule our lives. It questions what it means to be human more than ever.
David Hain's insight:

“If you don't design your own life plan, chances are you'll fall into someone else's plan. And guess what they have planned for you? Not much." Jim Rohn

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

How Reverse Mentorship can benefit your business | The Economic Voice

How Reverse Mentorship can benefit your business | The Economic Voice | Positive futures | Scoop.it
With age and experience comes wisdom, but all too often in the business world, hubris can come along for the ride too. Subconsciously survivorship and confirmation biases are at work; good decisions are reinforced, and poor ones fall out of the memory – which distorts their real importance.
So, can these experienced executives learn something from Millennials?

According to William Buist, Founder of xTEN Club, the answer is; Yes. And the way to achieve this is through reverse mentoring.

Reverse mentoring flips the traditional mentor-protégé model on its head as younger professionals “mentor” their older colleagues. By injecting fresh ideas and a new perspective, reverse mentoring counteracts the inaccurate assumptions, inane biases and business blind spots that come from being in an industry, or a role, for too long.
David Hain's insight:

Everyone in an organisation has something to bring to the table. Jack Welch promoted reverse mentoring to reinforce that. Great idea!

more...
Christiane Windhausen's curator insight, November 26, 2015 2:27 AM

Mentoring auf Augenhöhe, zwischen Kollegen aus unterschiedlichen Generationen. Was für eine tolle Chance, um miteinander zu wachsen und zu lernen, sich zu ergänzen und die eigenen Blindspots immer mal wieder zu 'beleuchten'. So kann Geben und Nehmen in Fluss kommen - und bleiben.