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Gen Y: Expectations of the Workplace | Visual.ly

Gen Y: Expectations of the Workplace | Visual.ly | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The generation born in the 1980's and 1990's, typically regarded as increasingly familiar with digital and electronic technology...

Via Jose Luis Anzizar
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Carl Jung On Why We Must Learn To Accept Ourselves Before We Can Help Others

Carl Jung On Why We Must Learn To Accept Ourselves Before We Can Help Others | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Carl Jung exhibited the sort of serene wisdom that is usually reserved for the reclusive-hermit-sage. Yet, he arrived at his personal “wholeness” not through the traditional route of Christian grace or Buddhist meditation, but through scientific and psychological means. Delving into his own troubled mind and reflecting on the neuroses of his patients, he arrived at an unsettling insight.

We must learn to accept our own darkness if we want to overcome our own neurosis.

Without this self-acceptance, our attempts to help others will be futile, both on an individual and global level.

Alan Watts said that Jung intimately embraced his own dark side and:

[H]e would not condemn the things in others and would therefore not be lead into those thoughts, feelings, and acts of violence towards others which are always characteristic of the people who project the devil in themselves upon the outside – upon somebody else – upon the scapegoat.
David Hain's insight:

Help can only come when a problem is acknowledged - it starts with self-acceptance - light and dark sides...!

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Why 2016 Was Actually One of the Best Years on Record

Why 2016 Was Actually One of the Best Years on Record | Positive futures | Scoop.it

By conventional wisdom, 2016 has been a horrible year. Only someone living in a cave could have missed the flood of disheartening headlines. However, if 2016 continues the global trends of previous years, it may turn out to have been one of the best years for humanity as a whole.
Those of us who live in the world of poverty research and rigorous measurement have watched many global indicators improve consistently for the past few decades. Between 1990 and 2013 (the last year for which there is good data), the number of people living in extreme poverty dropped by more than half, from 1.85 billion to 770 million. As the University of Oxford’s Max Roser recently put it, the top headline every day for the past two decades should have been: “Number of people in extreme poverty fell by 130,000 since yesterday.” At the same time, child mortality has dropped by nearly half, while literacy, vaccinations, and the number of people living in democracy have all increased.

Emergencies and bad news tend to command our attention, so it’s easy to miss humanity’s remarkable ability to improve its own lot. At the research and policy nonprofit Innovations for Poverty Action, we work with academics and field researchers to test which programs help the poor. Here are four things we’ve learned in 2016.

David Hain's insight:

Policy Action on the good things that really did happen in 2016!

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Never Stop Learning: Why True Masters Are Lifelong Students - Lindsey Pollak

Never Stop Learning: Why True Masters Are Lifelong Students - Lindsey Pollak | Positive futures | Scoop.it

As I talk to successful professionals I admire, I am often struck by one commonality: They are committed to always studying their craft. To me, it’s lifelong learning separates those who will continue to rise in their fields from those who are content to just float along.

No matter what stage of your career, having that thirst to keep learning – looking for more inspiration, more knowledge, more mastery – will be pivotal in your success. Here are three suggestions.

David Hain's insight:

The more we study and practice things that we believe are worthwhile, the better and broader we get!

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12 small lifestyle habits you can adopt to save more money

12 small lifestyle habits you can adopt to save more money | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We turned to the Quora threads, "What habit has saved you the largest amount of money?" and "What are some lifestyle changes that save money?" to round up the best — and easiest — ways people save money every day.
David Hain's insight:

Useful, crowd sourced post-Christmas advice for the New Year!

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The Top 10 Insights from the “Science of a Meaningful Life” in 2016

The Top 10 Insights from the “Science of a Meaningful Life” in 2016 | Positive futures | Scoop.it
At the start of 2016, Barbara Ehrenreich published an essay in The New York Times that took aim at the science of gratitude, criticizing it for focusing solely on benefits to oneself rather than to others. “This holiday gratitude is all about you,” she writes, “and how you can feel better.”
Nearly a year later, we can see what a false dichotomy this is. In our fifth annual Top 10 Insights from the Science of a Meaningful Life list, practices that involve thinking of other people, such as keeping a gratitude journal or performing acts of kindness, were found to bring strong personal benefits, like a healthier heart or a better sex life. And practices that seem to focus on the self, such as mindfulness and self-compassion, were linked to benefits for others, whether by fostering moral behavior or making you a better parent. 
Of course, we have argued since our founding in 2001 that our own individual well-being is intertwined with that of other people. Selfishness, greed, and hate may have seemed pervasive in 2016, but here we present evidence that compassion, generosity, and empathy are bedrocks of human behavior, essential to a meaningful life—and worth promoting and fighting for.
How did we come up with this list? We polled 350 researchers, asking them to name the findings from the science of a meaningful life that they considered most provocative, powerful, and influential. We looked at each of their nominations, to see how often the study had been cited since publication and what other people said about the finding. In the final stretch, our staff put the studies in the context of our 15 years of coverage, to see what jumped out at us as interesting or important. Here are our top choices.
David Hain's insight:

Some great articles here on research based ways to live (or not) a good life!

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What does success at work really mean?

What does success at work really mean? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
What defines a successful career? Why is it that, by conventional definitions, only the few people at the top of the ladder have successful careers, while the majority just survive and plenty fail? These questions have been been on my mind and in my heart for more than two decades, as I led the Human Resources department in several organizations. Let’s start with the first question. Let’s start with how we define a successful career.

The usual understanding of success revolves around two basic assumptions. The first: the hero of the workplace is the person who climbs all the way to the top. The second: getting to the top - winning promotion after promotion – is therefore the only thing that matters. This mindset leads us to endlessly climb the corporate ladder, adhering to the cult of physical and mental endurance to finally attain the status of corporate hero.

Does this really make sense?
David Hain's insight:

There are many heroes at work, not just those at the top! Have you questioned why being successful really means for you?

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This is How to Find Your Purpose – Better Humans

This is How to Find Your Purpose – Better Humans | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In 1958, Hunter S. Thompson was not yet famous.
He had yet to meet Johnny Depp, who would become one of his closest friends. He had yet to write Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, his most well-known novel. He hadn’t even discovered his personal style of reporting that would found the movement known as ‘gonzo journalism’.
He was, after all, only 22 years old.
Here’s what Hunter S. Thompson did do in 1958… He wrote a letter to a friend. But it wasn’t just any letter. It’s one of the most profound pieces on how to live that I have ever read.
David Hain's insight:

Meet the Great Gonzo! And more importantly, read his musings on how to live a life of purpose! Brilliant!

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, January 3, 11:16 AM

I was captivated by this letter written by American author Hunter Thompson to a friend. Most of all because he speaks to the Hallmarks of Relationship - Centered Leadership; Authenticity, Purpose, Presence, Resilience, Moral Courage and Trustworthiness. I found it encouraging, helpful and refreshing in moment in our history that may present challenges to finding our direction.

Tom Wojick's comment, January 3, 11:17 AM
Thanks for this David it's a great read and resource.
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Cities in Transition

Cities in Transition | Positive futures | Scoop.it
CommonsPolis— a civil society initiative to create dialogue between progressive municipalist movements and city governments, and European citizens — held an encounter described as “a common space for exchange; cities in transition and citizen struggles” in Paris on November 24, 2016, at the offices of the Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation (FPH) and with the collaboration of the Utopia Movement. Spanish activists from a variety of regions were invited to share with their French counterparts their recent experiences of entering the municipal public administrations, and their efforts to make the political process more participatory and inclusive for citizens. The event was held in Spanish (Castellano) and French, with simultaneous interpretation. I went along with Stacco Troncoso as observers from the P2P Foundation. We were invited to attend, listen, and share our P2P/Commons perspective about the coming political landscape.
David Hain's insight:

The activists are on the rise in local politics - and they're talking to each other!

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Why are there still so many jobs?

Why are there still so many jobs? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Here's a paradox you don't hear much about: despite a century of creating machines to do our work for us, the proportion of adults in the US with a job has consistently gone up for the past 125 years. Why hasn't human labor become redundant and our skills obsolete? In this talk about the future of work, economist David Autor addresses the question of why there are still so many jobs and comes up with a surprising, hopeful answer.
David Hain's insight:

An optimistic view about the rise of the robots!

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3 Mindfulness Trends to Watch in 2017

3 Mindfulness Trends to Watch in 2017 | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Many people who are new to mindfulness are often hesitant to jump in due to misconceptions about the practice. Mindfulness expert David Gelles shares in his book, Mindful Work, "Meditation doesn't require us to wear robes, chant in a foreign language, or sit with our legs folded. Instead, mindfulness meditation simply asks that we take a comfortable position--sitting, lying down, or even standing--and observe our thoughts, emotions, and sensations."

The following are some of the top meaningful developments in mindfulness that everyone should follow in 2017.
David Hain's insight:

Mindfulness is mainstream, and here to stay!

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The Managerial Entitlement Complex – Signal v. Noise

The Managerial Entitlement Complex – Signal v. Noise | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s popular for managers to bitch about how millennials have an entitlement complex. It’s always easy to pick on someone smaller and younger than you, isn’t it?
I’ll tell you who has the entitlement complex. Any manager that feels entitled to someone else’s personal time has an entitlement complex.
Any manager who expects a response from an employee at any time of night has an entitlement complex. Any manager who expects someone to get back to them at 4pm on a Sunday has an entitlement complex. Any manager who thinks someone’s life comes second to their work has an entitlement complex.
Paying someone a salary doesn’t mean you own them. It means they work for you. During work. Work is not always, work is sometimes. If a manager thinks work is always or whenever they want it to be, they have an entitlement complex.
David Hain's insight:

Work is only part of life. Responding to these weekend emails is a choice - not a duty!

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The 50 big ideas for 2017: What to watch in the year ahead

The 50 big ideas for 2017: What to watch in the year ahead | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Let’s be honest: We’re ready for 2016 to end. After a year of polarizing politics, devastating natural disasters and a growing number of global refugees as wars wage on, we want to hope that bigger—and possibly better—things lay ahead in the new year.

To get a sense of what’s next, LinkedIn editors reached out to some of our most prescient writers—our Top Voices, Influencers and members of our Next Wave list—as well as other people who inspire us to find out what they're predicting in the coming year.

Their responses are encouraging, humorous and sobering. Some are ambitious, possibly overly so: We’ll finally fix the internet, ridding it of trolls and anonymity. Others are specific and practical: Instagram will debut clickable links. Surely, not all of these ideas will materialize, but the vision and sentiment behind them is worth reading—and working towards. If it takes five years instead of one, for example, to transplant the first pig kidney into a human, we’ll take it. 

So, without further ado, here are the 50 big ideas for 2017:
David Hain's insight:

Some good, some bad, some uncertain - predictions for 2017 from people who profess to know...

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The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work - Leadership & Change Magazine

The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work - Leadership & Change Magazine | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Without work, we may drown in a sea of possibilities – or starve from no possibilities at all. The start of work means the end of freedom but also of doubt and wayward desires. “The accountant’s ten thousand possibilities have been reduced to an agreeable handful. She is a Business Unit Senior Manager, rather than a vaporous transient consciousness in an incidental universe.”

Life is no longer mysterious, sad, haunting, touching, confusing or melancholy: it is a practical stage of clear-eyed action when you’re at work.

Even when your workplace is not Utopia – work gives structure, meaning, and identity. Even when you don’t like your job. Like those many adults who spend their entire adult lives working at jobs chosen by their sixteen-year-old selves….
David Hain's insight:

Work is a huge part of our lives, yet some people spend decades in work that does nothing for them. Try not to be one of them!

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13 Things You Should Avoid Telling Yourself Every Day

13 Things You Should Avoid Telling Yourself Every Day | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It takes almost no time to find articles and stories that will tell you about the good habits or motivational mantras of people who have achieved success in their chosen field.
But, as interesting and inspirational as those articles can be, they only tell half of the story.
Many people will read them and instead of being inspired, come away with a dejected and defeated feeling.
“I’ll never be like those successful people,” they say to themselves. “They’re way more committed than I am.”
That’s negative self-talk. We’re all guilty of it from time to time.
There are at least four different types of negative self-talk: filtering, personalizing, catastrophizing and polarizing.
Here’s a sample of some of the things we may say to ourselves — things that serve only to steer us off the road to success.
David Hain's insight:

Fixed mindset --> self destructive habits. Good infographic with head-phrases to watch out for!

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When You Are Depressed, Make Something. – Be Yourself

When You Are Depressed, Make Something. – Be Yourself | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Depression doesn’t discriminate. Everyone is a potential target for it, regardless of gender, age, ethnicity, geographical location, or income. We are all subject to its grasp, and remember, it’s not the same thing as sadness.
Sadness is when you feel down because things aren’t going your way. Depression is when you feel down even when all is going well.
David Hain's insight:

1 in 4 of us will suffer this way. When it happens, put something out (words, music, art) rather than taking something in (drink, pills, bingewatch)!

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Japanese company replaces office workers with artificial intelligence

Japanese company replaces office workers with artificial intelligence | Positive futures | Scoop.it
A future in which human workers are replaced by machines is about to become a reality at an insurance firm in Japan, where more than 30 employees are being laid off and replaced with an artificial intelligence system that can calculate payouts to policyholders.

Fukoku Mutual Life Insurance believes it will increase productivity by 30% and see a return on its investment in less than two years. The firm said it would save about 140m yen (£1m) a year after the 200m yen (£1.4m) AI system is installed this month. Maintaining it will cost about 15m yen (£100k) a year.

The move is unlikely to be welcomed, however, by 34 employees who will be made redundant by the end of March.
David Hain's insight:

The future is already here - and it's a grim taste of a potential new reality!

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Bosses vs. Leaders: Companies Need Neither

Bosses vs. Leaders: Companies Need Neither | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It was just a couple of hours ago that I saw an illustration here on my news stream on LinkedIn, about the differences between "the boss" and "the leader". Most of us have probably seen this kind of visual many times before: They invariably argue for "bosses becoming more like leaders", for "leaders becoming more transformational", or for companies to not have bosses altogether. Now, let´s look at this line of thinking a little bit closer.
David Hain's insight:

Debunking the boss vs. leader debate!

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The Value of Doing Things That Scare You

You’re no doubt familiar with the dictum to “do one thing every day that scares you.”

The quotation is often misattributed to Eleanor Roosevelt, who said something far more meaningful (if less meme-able):

“You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, ‘I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.’ You must do the thing you think you cannot do.”
The directive to “face your fears” is often boiled down to platitudes: Doing scary things helps you grow! The magic happens outside your comfort zone! Well-meaning though the sentiments may be, they’re unhelpful without the why.

And because fear serves a real and important purpose — keeping us out of harm’s way — the directive to frighten ourselves on purpose is fraught.

So what’s the scientific case to be made for doing things that scare you?

David Hain's insight:

How (and why) to expose yourself productively!

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How Technology Is Enabling the Rise of the One-Person Business

How Technology Is Enabling the Rise of the One-Person Business | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The gig economy has come a long way in the past decade, but its best days are yet to come. These three technologies will continue to evolve, and it’s only a matter of time before companies of all sizes meaningfully gravitate toward hiring more one-person businesses to cut costs, increase productivity, and gain the ability to quickly scale up or down based on their real-time needs.
David Hain's insight:

A positive view of the gig economy!

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How to Teach Your Kids about the Brain 

How to Teach Your Kids about the Brain  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
When children understand what’s happening in the brain, it can be the first step to having the power to make choices. Knowledge can be equally powerful to parents too. Knowing how the brain works means we can also understand how to respond when our children need our help.

Sometimes our brains can become overwhelmed with feelings of fear, sadness or anger, and when this happens, it’s confusing—especially to children. So giving children ways to make sense of what’s happening in their brain is important. It’s also helpful for children to have a vocabulary for their emotional experiences that others can understand. Think of it like a foreign language, and if the other people in your family speak that language too, then it’s easier to communicate with them.

So how do you start these conversations with your children, make it playful enough to keep them engaged, and simple enough for them to understand?

Here is how I teach children (and parents) how to understand the brain.
David Hain's insight:

The Upstairs, Downstairs of the brain - useful for adults as well as kids!

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Compassion Is Weaved Throughout Our Nervous System, Researchers Have Found

Compassion Is Weaved Throughout Our Nervous System, Researchers Have Found | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Nietzsche saw compassion as an utter failing. If you were really compassionate, you would wish sickness, difficulty, hardship, and woe on your friends, as these were the only things that helped them develop, making them stronger and smarter. With the advent of psychology, we began to see the environment’s influence and that of our upbringing. Loving parents for instance brought up compassionate children, while self-centered one’s bred selfish offspring.

Now, evolutionary science is weighing in, and finds that compassion may have developed as an evolutionary advantage which helped our species survive and thrive. This isn’t a new concept. Darwin himself in The Descent of Man argues that sympathy and compassion are some of humanities strongest traits. Instead, Darwin’s “Survival of the fittest” was taken to mean that humans are naturally competitive, and overwhelmingly motivated by self-interest.
David Hain's insight:

Science is revealing more about our need to show compassion. Let's show it some more in 2017!

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Critical thinking: what is it? And why does it matter?

Critical thinking: what is it? And why does it matter? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
How, then, to define critical thinking? It is certainly not an easy question to answer. But perhaps a definition of it is, in the end, unimportant. The important thing is that it does need to be taught, and we need to ensure graduates emerge from university being good at it.

One thing is certain: beyond vague pronouncements and including “critical thinking” among nebulous lists of unmet or hoped-for graduate attributes, universities should be paying more attention to critical thinking and doing a lot more to cultivate it.
David Hain's insight:

Critical thinking skills will be crucial in 21C!

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The Primary Barrier Stopping You From Everything You Want In Life

The Primary Barrier Stopping You From Everything You Want In Life | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Most people aren’t willing to feel difficult emotions on a regular basis. However, if you’re willing to disregard how you feel in the moment, you’ll have access to a world of opportunity unavailable to 99% of the population.
When you feel the fear and do it anyways, you get the satisfaction of living life on your terms. Instead of being a hostage to your emotions, you get to experience them more deeply.
David Hain's insight:

A plea for boldness - and it's benefits!

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50 Amazing Human Brain Facts (Based on the Latest Science)

50 Amazing Human Brain Facts (Based on the Latest Science) | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The study of the human brain has been called the last frontier in science.

The field of neuroscience is still in its infancy, but is rapidly exploding — turning yesterday’s brain “facts” into today’s brain “myths.”

Experts agree there is more we don’t know about the brain than we currently know. (1)

Here are some of the most interesting brain facts backed by science.

Some will fill you with awe.

Some will make you pause and think.

Others will make you realize what an imperfect “machine” we’ve got running the show.

We think at least a few of these will …

Blow. Your. Mind.
David Hain's insight:

Knowing a few brain facts - and myths - could make a big difference to your personal and professional practice!

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Elon Musk and Bill Thurston on the Power of Thinking for Yourself

Elon Musk and Bill Thurston on the Power of Thinking for Yourself | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Self-taught mental models — or, in simple terms, figuring things out for yourself — seem to be a favorite weapon of brilliant minds. (Richard Feynman, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist, also relied heavily on personal mental models.) In many cases, it is the unique point-of-view afforded by self-directed learning and deep thought that enables someone to unleash an idea of minor genius.
How can you go about developing a unique view of the world?
David Hain's insight:

A clarion call to get back to first principles to sharpen your thinking - but you'll probably have to unlearn that school rote exam stuff first!

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donhornsby's curator insight, December 20, 2016 7:00 PM
We often live life by analogy and simply assume that what has been true before must be true in the future. Instead, break your problems down to their first principles and you may see very different solutions emerge.