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Gen Y: Expectations of the Workplace | Visual.ly

Gen Y: Expectations of the Workplace | Visual.ly | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The generation born in the 1980's and 1990's, typically regarded as increasingly familiar with digital and electronic technology...

Via Jose Luis Anzizar
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Positive futures
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What makes life worth living in the face of death

What makes life worth living in the face of death | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In this deeply moving talk, Lucy Kalanithi reflects on life and purpose, sharing the story of her late husband, Paul, a young neurosurgeon who turned to writing after his terminal cancer diagnosis. "Engaging in the full range of experience — living and dying, love and loss — is what we get to do," Kalanithi says. "Being human doesn't happen despite suffering — it happens within it."
David Hain's insight:

How we treat people at the end of life (and remember, young people die, too) is a critical measure of our society. if this doesn't make you think about that, nothing will...

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7 Signs That You’re Lying

7 Signs That You’re Lying | Positive futures | Scoop.it
New research by Dr. Leanne ten Brinke at the Haas School of Business suggests that, while most of us have pretty good instincts when it comes to recognizing liars, we hesitate to call out lying in professional environments because we feel guilty for being suspicious. Calling someone a liar for no good reason is a frightening proposition for most.

Dr. ten Brinke’s research points to objective, well-documented physiological and behavioral changes - or “tells” - that we can use to make accurate assessments of other people’s truthfulness. Both her work and that of Dr. William Ury (Harvard) in Getting to Yes, can help us recognize autonomic behaviors in others and ourselves, in order to increase our truthfulness. Here are seven “tells” that may indicate someone is lying:

David Hain's insight:

Useful guidelines for your personal crap detector!

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Top Employers Say Millennials Need These 4 Skills in 2017

Top Employers Say Millennials Need These 4 Skills in 2017 | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Millennial job seekers receive conflicting messages from employers and career advisors: on the one hand, we’re told robots will someday replace our technical skills, so why bother. On the other hand, we’re told hard skills are a hot commodity.

Which is it?

Employers value technical skills, to be sure. But I asked more than 100 top HR managers, recruiters and CEOs which was more important for entry-level job seekers, and nearly all of them said soft skills. “We look for candidates with a solid foundation of soft skills and trust so that the rest can be built upon it,” Emőke Starr, Head of HR at Prezi, said. Likewise, Wayfair's Global Senior Director of Talent Management and Employee Development, Marcy Axelrad, said that Wayfair often doesn’t require entry-level candidates to “have the exact experience in the area for which she/he is interviewing.”

Traditional soft skills include leadership, communication and collaboration. Millennials tend to excel at these or, at the very least, know they should. But there are four additional soft skills that are under-discussed, rare and essential in the modern workforce:
David Hain's insight:

4 areas of soft skill to focus on if you are looking for a job?

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How To “Hack” Human Communication 101 

How To “Hack” Human Communication 101  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
I’ve been failing at human communication for 26 years now, so I think I’m more than qualified to talk about this.
Over the years, I have pulled countless communication doozies. I have wiggled my way around questions, nodded my head when I should have shaken it, said “yes” when I mean to say “no,” refused to ask for help, failed to give compliments, and I hated saying “sorry.”
I started getting a little better each year since 2011, so I’m improving. Here are six communication “hacks” from those past six years:
David Hain's insight:

Succinct sense on the journey to communication clarity!

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The Art and Science of Getting into the Flow

The Art and Science of Getting into the Flow | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Research suggests that if you can cultivate the flow in your daily life, the benefits don’t just stop at job performance — the flow state of mind also contributes to health and well-being. But as soon as we try to bottle up the feeling and carry it into less appealing tasks, it seems to elude us. Rather than gettting in the flow, we end up disengaged and working harder than ever on work we just don’t appreciate.

Thankfully, cutting-edge psychological research can help us cultivate flow when we’re elbow-deep in work we don’t want to do. When facing difficult tasks, we can experience meaning, move through challenges, and embrace productivity while easing stress.

Quite simply, flow psychology offers an alternative to the daily grind: a way of working that is easier, more effective, and more enjoyable.
David Hain's insight:

How to find your flow! Everybody needs some time in this state...

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 26, 1:36 PM
Flow activities are ones that truly engage participants. They range from busy and active to reflective and quiet. I had an activity called "The Culture of Peace" that was an example of the former and art was often like the second. Students would comment to each other they could "this" all day.
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The Strange Way Being “Good” Hurts Your Willpower

The Strange Way Being “Good” Hurts Your Willpower | Positive futures | Scoop.it
When reflecting on the future self, the brain’s activation is identical to when it is considering the traits of another person,” writes Kelly McGonigal in The Willpower Instinct, a book that has helped me change the way I see and move toward my goals. So the Paulette of Next Year can feel like another kind of authority figure, someone trying to make me do something I don’t want to do today.
When I screw myself over, by getting in debt, being hungover, or procrastinating on my work until it becomes a flurry of panic typing, I rail against this person inside. “You’re the worst!” I tell myself.
According to McGonigal, I’m going about this all wrong. Firstly, she says, berating yourself for being “bad,” is only more likely to keep you from acting in the way you want to act. Guilt is a stressor, firstly, and stress weakens your willpower.
Secondly, by moralizing my behavior, labeling it as “good” or “bad,” I’m opening myself up to the risk of moral licensing.
David Hain's insight:

Why we need top learn to re-frame that inner voice...!

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 25, 3:10 PM
This is an interesting article.
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How the London borough of Harrow is building the council of the future | Nesta

How the London borough of Harrow is building the council of the future | Nesta | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The LB of Harrow has been managing cuts since 2008, when government funding increased below inflation. The “fat” was trimmed long ago. Yet the council is determined to keep delivering services effectively, and efficiently. Harrow recognises that the expectations of citizens are changing; they are used to a certain standard and experience in other areas of their lives.

Harrow also understands that technology is advancing significantly, and innovations are being developed across the world that people could benefit from.

So how does a council change that culture so that it attracts, catalyses, and incubates innovation? Could this be the answer to delivering high-quality services as funding pressures intensify?

Working with TechUK, Harrow have designed a programme which aims to find out.
David Hain's insight:

Contrary to received wisdom, there are some amazing projects - and challenges in the Public Sector. Have you considered...?

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How Do You See the World Around You?

How Do You See the World Around You? | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Do you view the glass as half-full or half-empty? I hope you said “neither” — it’s never good to see the world through a single filter. The fact is, every gear in your car does something different. What would happen if you got stuck in neutral? The same can be said of the way that you view things. How do you see the world?

Unfortunately, we often fall victim to “thinking traps” that influence our feelings and impact our behavior. It’s not a matter of lacking intelligence, but rather of being blinded by a filter that distorts our thinking process. For example, if you wake up thinking that today’s going to be awesome, you’ll likely be happier and more productive than if you fear that problems are lurking around every corner. If you look for problems hard enough, you’re bound to find one.

The key is to know how you see the world and to manage it accordingly. Do these 20 behavioral filters sound familiar?

David Hain's insight:

You will fall victim to some of these thinking traps - best learn to recognise them!

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Uh-Oh... Got More Passion Than Talent?

Uh-Oh... Got More Passion Than Talent? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Find a way to work at the intersection of these four circles.

But be careful... don't stray too far from what you love. There's a Japanese concept called ikigai, which means "reason for being." You have one, but it can take a great deal of effort, experimentation, and self-inspection to find it.

In my experience, people often get pushed away from their "reason for being" by a strong interest that overshadows other of their interests. That is, you have a strong interest that is not supported by your talents, and this fact causes you so much disappointment that you stop examining your other interests. But if you look deeply, you will likely find other interests that are supported by your talents.
David Hain's insight:

How to find your Ikigai - your reason for being!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, April 15, 7:53 PM
good insights into living on purpose
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 15, 8:04 PM
I loved teaching, people paid me to teach, and I did it well. The concept of ikigai has merit through effort, experimenting, and self-reflection. As well, it might be we have to find the right people who are willing to lift us up.
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Young people's well-being - Office for National Statistics

Young people's well-being - Office for National Statistics | Positive futures | Scoop.it
How young people aged 16 to 24 in the UK are faring in a range of areas that matter to their quality of life, reflecting both the circumstances of their lives and their own perspectives.
David Hain's insight:

What life is like today in the UK if you're 16-24. Among other things, anxiety is on the rise!

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This is How to Do Things You Don’t Want to Do 

This is How to Do Things You Don’t Want to Do  | Positive futures | Scoop.it

The common denominator of success — the secret of success of every person who has ever been successful — lies in the fact that they formed the habit of doing things that failures don’t like to do."
 — Albert E.N. Grey


No matter what you want to accomplish in life, it’s going to involve discomfort:
A great career or business requires hard work.
A healthy body needs exercise and foods you don’t necessarily like.
Meaningful relationships need vulnerability and compromises.
In fact, anything worthwhile often requires that you do what you don’t want to do.
And that can be hard.
But it doesn’t have to be.

David Hain's insight:

No gain....Positive ways to break through the discomfort barrier!

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Inspired or Expired

Inspired or Expired | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Here are some questions to help us dig deep in our heart to uncover our inspiring purpose:

What makes you completely lose track of time, forget to eat, and causes all your aches, pains, and discomfort to magically disappear?
What did your eight-year-old-self dream of doing and becoming?
What brings you the greatest joy and makes you feel the most alive?
What are you best at…what are your true strengths?
What do you have an insatiable desire to learn more about?
For what do you want to be remembered when you leave this world?
When we ask these questions of ourselves clear patterns emerge. Then comes the fun part. We can now take action in the direction of our answers and open our eyes to WOOs that are in alignment with our purpose. As Christopher Reeve put it, “At first dreams seem impossible, then improbable, then inevitable.” Our purpose is what inspires us to get there. 
David Hain's insight:

Questions to help you find out why you are here and what you want to do with your life.

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5 Essential Daily Visualization Exercises (From A Master Energy Healer)

5 Essential Daily Visualization Exercises (From A Master Energy Healer) | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Visualization is so effective in creating a life change that it’s used by psychologists, life coaches and even monks.
There is a visualization you can do for just about anything you
want to achieve in your life.
We spoke to Jeffrey Allen, also known as “The Healers’ Healer”, to get his go-to recommendations for the most common everyday problems.
David Hain's insight:

Nice infographic on visualisations you can make good use of!

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On the Brink of Massive Change: Is This The Future You Want?

On the Brink of Massive Change: Is This The Future You Want? | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Our world is going to look and operate drastically different over the next two decades. Powered by exponential technology, the cost of storage and computing are near zero making it possible to crunch gigantic data sets and enabling a new generation of artificial intelligence (AI). Application development tools and enabling technologies (i.e., sensors, cameras, robots) have improved dramatically. The combination makes it possible to automate even super complex tasks like driving.

“They already are much smarter than us at many things,” said Harvard’s Erik Brynjolfsson. “The question is ‘Can we adapt fast enough?’”

It is hard to tell exactly how this will all play out, but there four primary reasons you and the young people you care about should pay attention to artificial intelligence–we think it’s time to #AskAboutAI.

David Hain's insight:

Artificial Intelligence will dominate the future, like it or not. One thing we can do is to learn all about it...

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Naming, Taming, and Erasing Your Fear Patterns: The 7 Universal Obstacles 

Naming, Taming, and Erasing Your Fear Patterns: The 7 Universal Obstacles  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
But here comes the tricky part. As the Fear Patterns are mostly unconscious behavior and habits, we are often not aware of them. We are mostly oblivious to how they can play havoc in our lives, the lives of others, and in our workplaces, through harmful and destructive behavior. Being in the throes of an egoic fear attack saps us of our full energy and personal power, and can prevent us from making a difference through our voices and actions. That is why it is vitally important to be able to recognize, name, tame, and even erase these Fear Patterns and move through these Obstacles.  By now I trust you are curious enough to want to discover the other Fear Patterns and start pondering which ones are your biggest adversaries. As I mentioned before, there are 7 Fear Patterns or Universal Obstacles and they work in pairs:

The 7 Universal Fear Patterns / Obstacles:

Pair 1: Self-Destruction and Greed

Pair 2: Self-Deprecation and Arrogance

Pair 3: Martyrdom and Impatience

Stands alone: Stubbornness
David Hain's insight:

Are these some of the patterns that might subconsciously be holding you back?

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8 mistakes I made as a manager and how you can avoid them

8 mistakes I made as a manager and how you can avoid them | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Winning business is so distractingly sexy that we keep making the same mistake over and over: we prioritize business development over fostering good managers.

I know “growth” is the word to emblazon across the sky, but without good managers a healthy culture and retention are simply not possible.

When I first became a manager, I made every mistake in the book.

David Hain's insight:

I made most of these mistakes too...

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How to Be a Lifelong Learner

How to Be a Lifelong Learner | Positive futures | Scoop.it
People around the world are hungry to learn. Instructor Barbara Oakley discovered this when her online course “Learning How to Learn”—filmed in her basement in front of a green screen—attracted more than 1.5 million students.
Part of the goal of her course—and her new book, Mindshift: Break Through Obstacles to Learning and Discover Your Hidden Potential—is to debunk some of the myths that get in the way of learning, like the belief that we’re bad at math or too old to change careers. These are just artificial obstacles, she argues. 

“People can often do more, change more, and learn more—often far more—than they’ve ever dreamed possible. Our potential is hidden in plain sight all around us,” Oakley writes.
She should know: Throughout her early schooling, she flunked math and science classes and resisted family pressure to pursue a science degree. Today? She’s a professor of engineering at Oakland University, after many different jobs in between.
Her book aims to help readers discover their hidden potential, by offering them both the tools and the inspiration to transform themselves through learning. 
David Hain's insight:

Learning to learn - and never stopping the learning journey - is one of the secrets of a long, fulfilled and successful life!

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The why and how of effective altruism

The why and how of effective altruism | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you're lucky enough to live without want, it's a natural impulse to be altruistic to others. But, asks philosopher Peter Singer, what's the most effective way to give? He talks through some surprising thought experiments to help you balance emotion and practicality — and make the biggest impact with whatever you can share.
David Hain's insight:

The best ways to put back into society?

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Turning Setbacks into Success

Turning Setbacks into Success | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In every person’s career, there are pivotal moments that stand out. These experiences can range from landing your dream internship to being made partner at a firm, and each holds its own set of lessons. However, I’d argue that the setbacks and failures we experience shape us equally as much as our successes. We are defined by our failures, the lessons we choose to learn, and how close we stay to the pulse of change in order to keep up with market transitions. I’d like to share a few are key lessons I’ve learned:
David Hain's insight:

Career lessons form someone who has made it very big. Worth noting...!

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4 lessons from the longest-running study on happiness

4 lessons from the longest-running study on happiness | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Have you ever wished you could fast-forward your life so you could see if the decisions you’re making will lead to satisfaction and health in the future? In the world of scientific research, the closest you can get to that is by looking at the Harvard Study of Adult Development — a study that has tracked the lives of 724 men for 78 years, and one of the longest studies of adult life ever done. Investigators surveyed the group every two years about their physical and mental health, their professional lives, their friendships, their marriages — and also subjected them to periodic in-person interviews, medical exams, blood tests and brain scans.

The big takeaways from that talk: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier, and loneliness kills. But there were, of course, many more lessons to be learned — the study has yielded more than 100 published papers so far, with enough data for “scores more” — and Waldinger shares four of them here. 

David Hain's insight:

Work on those relationships for a long and happy life...! obvious - but true!

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One of NYU’s most popular classes is now a book

One of NYU’s most popular classes is now a book | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The Science of Happiness is a rare, but not exactly unheard of, class. Lerner pointed to similar courses offered at the University of Pennsylvania — where the father of positive psychology, Martin Seligman, taught — as well as Harvard.
“There are a ton of positive psychology classes around the country, but I don’t know any of them quite like ours, where we deal with how to both overcome challenges and how to thrive,” Schlechter said.
The two hope their new book becomes required reading for incoming freshmen.
“My dream is that this book lands on the pillow of every matriculated high school senior and incoming college student in the country,” Lerner said. “It can help make their entire experience a better one.”
David Hain's insight:

How to ace college, deal with challenges and have fun!

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Becoming a Digital Nomad: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Becoming a Digital Nomad: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly | Positive futures | Scoop.it
My first job out of college was as an English instructor for an education center in Hong Kong. A year later, when it came time for me to leave, my boss proposed that I continue working for her, remotely.

That’s how I stumbled into the digital nomad lifestyle — by writing curriculum for my employer in Hong Kong while backpacking around India and China. I’ve never looked back.

And I’m not alone — digital nomadism is the new normal. As soon as the technology became available, people like me packed their bags and took their work on the road. With an increasing number of communication channels like Skype and Slack and flexible payment options like Gusto and Paypal, the digital nomad movement has only continued to gain steam.

But there’s more than one way to become a digital nomad.
If you’re interested in launching a career as an entrepreneur on the road or want to find that remote job of your dreams, here are some tips to get you started.
David Hain's insight:

Is the life of a digital nomad for you? Informative article on pros and cons!

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Three Principles For Living Your Tiny Beautiful Life

Three Principles For Living Your Tiny Beautiful Life | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Now. Why is mind always after your attention? Because it needs attention. Mind is a child. If it is not heard, it grows anxious, afraid, desperate. It’s most needy illusion is that it exists. But like the idea of the chair versus the chair, mind has no independent existence at all. This is what is meant by “emptiness”.
So: mind is messy. It is always shouting. It will fool you, so desperate is it for your attention, you, the silent ocean. It will ask: “what if they don’t really love me? What if I am not good enough?”. And so then you will go out and do foolish things, acts of self sabotage. Worse, captive to mind, you will spend your life angry, afraid, and confuse genuine happiness with the relief of mental chatter.
Life is simple. Here is life, in three simple principles.
David Hain's insight:

What's really important - how to focus on the critical things without mental distractions getting on top...

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13 Things I Believe

13 Things I Believe | Positive futures | Scoop.it
I have taught an introduction to organizational behavior class for over 30 years-- to both undergraduate and graduate students. I first taught it as a doctoral student at The University of Michigan and taught an ever-evolving version of the class almost every year since I landed at Stanford in 1983. For many years, the final day, especially the final 20 minutes or so, felt awkward and forced as I struggled to look back on what the class had learned, provide closure, and end on an upbeat note. About 15 years ago, I experimented with an ending ritual: I passed out a list of 12 things I believe, made a brief comment about each one, and thanked the class for their efforts and for putting up with my quirks and imperfections. The list contained many beliefs that were related to the class. But they also drew on other work I hadn't mentioned in class and my general perspective on life.
David Hain's insight:

Wise life lessons!

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8 Reasons Why Money's Not Worth What You Think

8 Reasons Why Money's Not Worth What You Think | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you live for money, it’s time to get a life. The truth is, money can’t buy everything. For example, money can’t buy peace of mind, good friends, a close-knit family, work-life balance, a worry-free day, good karma, time to relax, good health, a golden anniversary, quality time with your kids, a new beginning, natural beauty, happy memories, to name just a few. Many people are actually poor because the only thing they have is money. Are you in it just for the money?
David Hain's insight:

Good thoughts from @FSonnenberg on what is really important in life...

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