Positive futures
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#FutureLeaders ~helping students lead positive change

#FutureLeaders is the first step in providing a generation of young people with a framework of leadership development tools that challenge the status quo in our society.

 

As you may know, our schools and workplace cultures are plagued by bullying, negative bias and disengagement.  

 

Our goal is to and help students leverage the natural talents while learning how to use authority and popularity to help others and lead positive change in their schools, places of work and their families.  


Via AlGonzalezinfo
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AlGonzalezinfo's comment, March 28, 2013 2:05 PM
Su commentario y preguntas son muy provocativas!
David Hain's curator insight, July 16, 2013 7:04 AM

Nice video from Al Gonzalez and the very worthwhile Give Leadership Institute. Catch kids early and kick off great leadership habits!

John Michel's curator insight, July 16, 2013 1:17 PM

Superb insights...well worth the watch! 

Positive futures
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The Strange Way Being “Good” Hurts Your Willpower

The Strange Way Being “Good” Hurts Your Willpower | Positive futures | Scoop.it
When reflecting on the future self, the brain’s activation is identical to when it is considering the traits of another person,” writes Kelly McGonigal in The Willpower Instinct, a book that has helped me change the way I see and move toward my goals. So the Paulette of Next Year can feel like another kind of authority figure, someone trying to make me do something I don’t want to do today.
When I screw myself over, by getting in debt, being hungover, or procrastinating on my work until it becomes a flurry of panic typing, I rail against this person inside. “You’re the worst!” I tell myself.
According to McGonigal, I’m going about this all wrong. Firstly, she says, berating yourself for being “bad,” is only more likely to keep you from acting in the way you want to act. Guilt is a stressor, firstly, and stress weakens your willpower.
Secondly, by moralizing my behavior, labeling it as “good” or “bad,” I’m opening myself up to the risk of moral licensing.
David Hain's insight:

Why we need top learn to re-frame that inner voice...!

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How the London borough of Harrow is building the council of the future | Nesta

How the London borough of Harrow is building the council of the future | Nesta | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The LB of Harrow has been managing cuts since 2008, when government funding increased below inflation. The “fat” was trimmed long ago. Yet the council is determined to keep delivering services effectively, and efficiently. Harrow recognises that the expectations of citizens are changing; they are used to a certain standard and experience in other areas of their lives.

Harrow also understands that technology is advancing significantly, and innovations are being developed across the world that people could benefit from.

So how does a council change that culture so that it attracts, catalyses, and incubates innovation? Could this be the answer to delivering high-quality services as funding pressures intensify?

Working with TechUK, Harrow have designed a programme which aims to find out.
David Hain's insight:

Contrary to received wisdom, there are some amazing projects - and challenges in the Public Sector. Have you considered...?

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How Do You See the World Around You?

How Do You See the World Around You? | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Do you view the glass as half-full or half-empty? I hope you said “neither” — it’s never good to see the world through a single filter. The fact is, every gear in your car does something different. What would happen if you got stuck in neutral? The same can be said of the way that you view things. How do you see the world?

Unfortunately, we often fall victim to “thinking traps” that influence our feelings and impact our behavior. It’s not a matter of lacking intelligence, but rather of being blinded by a filter that distorts our thinking process. For example, if you wake up thinking that today’s going to be awesome, you’ll likely be happier and more productive than if you fear that problems are lurking around every corner. If you look for problems hard enough, you’re bound to find one.

The key is to know how you see the world and to manage it accordingly. Do these 20 behavioral filters sound familiar?

David Hain's insight:

You will fall victim to some of these thinking traps - best learn to recognise them!

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Uh-Oh... Got More Passion Than Talent?

Uh-Oh... Got More Passion Than Talent? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Find a way to work at the intersection of these four circles.

But be careful... don't stray too far from what you love. There's a Japanese concept called ikigai, which means "reason for being." You have one, but it can take a great deal of effort, experimentation, and self-inspection to find it.

In my experience, people often get pushed away from their "reason for being" by a strong interest that overshadows other of their interests. That is, you have a strong interest that is not supported by your talents, and this fact causes you so much disappointment that you stop examining your other interests. But if you look deeply, you will likely find other interests that are supported by your talents.
David Hain's insight:

How to find your Ikigai - your reason for being!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, April 15, 7:53 PM
good insights into living on purpose
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 15, 8:04 PM
I loved teaching, people paid me to teach, and I did it well. The concept of ikigai has merit through effort, experimenting, and self-reflection. As well, it might be we have to find the right people who are willing to lift us up.
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Young people's well-being - Office for National Statistics

Young people's well-being - Office for National Statistics | Positive futures | Scoop.it
How young people aged 16 to 24 in the UK are faring in a range of areas that matter to their quality of life, reflecting both the circumstances of their lives and their own perspectives.
David Hain's insight:

What life is like today in the UK if you're 16-24. Among other things, anxiety is on the rise!

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This is How to Do Things You Don’t Want to Do 

This is How to Do Things You Don’t Want to Do  | Positive futures | Scoop.it

The common denominator of success — the secret of success of every person who has ever been successful — lies in the fact that they formed the habit of doing things that failures don’t like to do."
 — Albert E.N. Grey


No matter what you want to accomplish in life, it’s going to involve discomfort:
A great career or business requires hard work.
A healthy body needs exercise and foods you don’t necessarily like.
Meaningful relationships need vulnerability and compromises.
In fact, anything worthwhile often requires that you do what you don’t want to do.
And that can be hard.
But it doesn’t have to be.

David Hain's insight:

No gain....Positive ways to break through the discomfort barrier!

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Inspired or Expired

Inspired or Expired | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Here are some questions to help us dig deep in our heart to uncover our inspiring purpose:

What makes you completely lose track of time, forget to eat, and causes all your aches, pains, and discomfort to magically disappear?
What did your eight-year-old-self dream of doing and becoming?
What brings you the greatest joy and makes you feel the most alive?
What are you best at…what are your true strengths?
What do you have an insatiable desire to learn more about?
For what do you want to be remembered when you leave this world?
When we ask these questions of ourselves clear patterns emerge. Then comes the fun part. We can now take action in the direction of our answers and open our eyes to WOOs that are in alignment with our purpose. As Christopher Reeve put it, “At first dreams seem impossible, then improbable, then inevitable.” Our purpose is what inspires us to get there. 
David Hain's insight:

Questions to help you find out why you are here and what you want to do with your life.

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5 Essential Daily Visualization Exercises (From A Master Energy Healer)

5 Essential Daily Visualization Exercises (From A Master Energy Healer) | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Visualization is so effective in creating a life change that it’s used by psychologists, life coaches and even monks.
There is a visualization you can do for just about anything you
want to achieve in your life.
We spoke to Jeffrey Allen, also known as “The Healers’ Healer”, to get his go-to recommendations for the most common everyday problems.
David Hain's insight:

Nice infographic on visualisations you can make good use of!

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The nature of wellbeing

The nature of wellbeing | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s for these reasons I’d like to suggest there is great value in grounding wellbeing in the science of today — complexity.

I’m not suggesting we throw everything away and start again. The research done to date is valuable in supporting people with finding their own way. But to suggest there are controllable and predictable ‘ways’ to wellbeing — is more telling of the limiting beliefs the researchers and experts are telling themselves — than it is about their findings.

Positive psychology and the wellness industry faces an important choice. It can remain stuck in status quo patterns of thinking — or think and act anew. In ways that more appropriately acknowledge wellbeing’s essential nature.

A transition to a complex perspective isn’t going to be simple, because it’s threatening to the people and institutes who are heavily invested in the status quo. Particularly the people in power whose identity is entrenched in the control and predict sciences. No one likes to wake up and realise the way they see the world is grounded in a limiting belief.

But it also presents a beautiful opportunity for our open-minded practitioners who can acknowledge the work done before them and facilitate the potential of thinking anew.

It’s time to progress the way we talk about, and create space for, wellbeing on both and individual and a collective level.
David Hain's insight:

Very insightful 'critical friend' perspective on the wellbeing movement. It's good but it';s complex - don't over-simplify it!

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The key to responsible and responsive leadership — the humanities

The key to responsible and responsive leadership — the humanities | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The problems we face today are grave. Poverty, disease, climate change, and threats to national and global security test even our greatest leaders. At such times, it may seem prudent to forget about art, music, literature, and languages.
We have been here before. In 1939, as war raged in Europe and Asia, Yale President Charles Seymour worried that the liberal arts would be neglected. Although the public did not think they were “useful,” Seymour was convinced the humanities were indispensable. “Without them,” he wrote movingly, “the heritage of the human experience is impoverished.”

Now, as then, we must value the humanities even in the midst of conflict and division. Only through the humanities can we prepare leaders of empathy, imagination, and understanding — responsive and responsible leaders who embrace complexity and diversity. Our institutions must also play a leadership role by making the treasures of the humanities widely available. It is our responsibility to prepare the leaders of tomorrow, and to elevate and protect “the heritage of the human experience” that we all share.
David Hain's insight:

Powerful plea by the president of Yale not to ignore art, music, literature in the rush for progress and the straitened times we inhabit!

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Hard Work is The Single Greatest Competitive Advantage

Hard Work is The Single Greatest Competitive Advantage | Positive futures | Scoop.it
You have probably heard this phrase a hundred times, “you have to work smart not hard to succeed”. Being smart is about making the right choices. Smart people move up the ladder real fast. But they also value the importance of hard work. Your idols, heroes, and every successful person you know worked hard and made important and calculated choices before they reaped the rewards of success.
As they reached the pinnacle of success, they grew more experienced, made less mistakes, improved their decision making skills and made the most of selected opportunities. And this resulted in something that saved them a lot of time, effort and energy. You can only give anything your best shot and work hard towards your goals.
David Hain's insight:

Talent is a gift, but it's the hard work that wraps it up in a really attractive package!

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3 Questions that Give Legs to Your Dreams

3 Questions that Give Legs to Your Dreams | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“I’m living the dream,” is sarcasm. The only dream you’re living includes stinky sweat and purposeful perseverance.

The only thing easy about big dreams is dreaming them.
David Hain's insight:

Dreams are better when you make them come to life - and that means effort !

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Why Everyone Needs a Philosophy to Live By

Over the past century philosophy has capitulated to science, and all of us, whether we realize it or not, live according to the philosophy that science espouses. Because of science's triumphant discovery of new technologies, we assume that its philosophy must be right. This is like a medieval person who happened to see an airplane fly overhead then rushes to tell his priest that God is real. Technology isn't the doorkeeper of truth. There is really only one viable way forward. A livable philosophy must be based on a foundation in reality, and for that purpose, the only way we know anything is through consciousness. Reality is an activity in consciousness, whether it's a matter of falling in love or creating the concept of an electron. Until everyone begins to explore a consciousness-based approach to reality, the pursuit of science and philosophy will both be hobbled.
David Hain's insight:

Deep stuff from Deepak Chopra, but well worth reading!

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Turning Setbacks into Success

Turning Setbacks into Success | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In every person’s career, there are pivotal moments that stand out. These experiences can range from landing your dream internship to being made partner at a firm, and each holds its own set of lessons. However, I’d argue that the setbacks and failures we experience shape us equally as much as our successes. We are defined by our failures, the lessons we choose to learn, and how close we stay to the pulse of change in order to keep up with market transitions. I’d like to share a few are key lessons I’ve learned:
David Hain's insight:

Career lessons form someone who has made it very big. Worth noting...!

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4 lessons from the longest-running study on happiness

4 lessons from the longest-running study on happiness | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Have you ever wished you could fast-forward your life so you could see if the decisions you’re making will lead to satisfaction and health in the future? In the world of scientific research, the closest you can get to that is by looking at the Harvard Study of Adult Development — a study that has tracked the lives of 724 men for 78 years, and one of the longest studies of adult life ever done. Investigators surveyed the group every two years about their physical and mental health, their professional lives, their friendships, their marriages — and also subjected them to periodic in-person interviews, medical exams, blood tests and brain scans.

The big takeaways from that talk: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier, and loneliness kills. But there were, of course, many more lessons to be learned — the study has yielded more than 100 published papers so far, with enough data for “scores more” — and Waldinger shares four of them here. 

David Hain's insight:

Work on those relationships for a long and happy life...! obvious - but true!

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One of NYU’s most popular classes is now a book

One of NYU’s most popular classes is now a book | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The Science of Happiness is a rare, but not exactly unheard of, class. Lerner pointed to similar courses offered at the University of Pennsylvania — where the father of positive psychology, Martin Seligman, taught — as well as Harvard.
“There are a ton of positive psychology classes around the country, but I don’t know any of them quite like ours, where we deal with how to both overcome challenges and how to thrive,” Schlechter said.
The two hope their new book becomes required reading for incoming freshmen.
“My dream is that this book lands on the pillow of every matriculated high school senior and incoming college student in the country,” Lerner said. “It can help make their entire experience a better one.”
David Hain's insight:

How to ace college, deal with challenges and have fun!

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Becoming a Digital Nomad: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Becoming a Digital Nomad: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly | Positive futures | Scoop.it
My first job out of college was as an English instructor for an education center in Hong Kong. A year later, when it came time for me to leave, my boss proposed that I continue working for her, remotely.

That’s how I stumbled into the digital nomad lifestyle — by writing curriculum for my employer in Hong Kong while backpacking around India and China. I’ve never looked back.

And I’m not alone — digital nomadism is the new normal. As soon as the technology became available, people like me packed their bags and took their work on the road. With an increasing number of communication channels like Skype and Slack and flexible payment options like Gusto and Paypal, the digital nomad movement has only continued to gain steam.

But there’s more than one way to become a digital nomad.
If you’re interested in launching a career as an entrepreneur on the road or want to find that remote job of your dreams, here are some tips to get you started.
David Hain's insight:

Is the life of a digital nomad for you? Informative article on pros and cons!

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Three Principles For Living Your Tiny Beautiful Life

Three Principles For Living Your Tiny Beautiful Life | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Now. Why is mind always after your attention? Because it needs attention. Mind is a child. If it is not heard, it grows anxious, afraid, desperate. It’s most needy illusion is that it exists. But like the idea of the chair versus the chair, mind has no independent existence at all. This is what is meant by “emptiness”.
So: mind is messy. It is always shouting. It will fool you, so desperate is it for your attention, you, the silent ocean. It will ask: “what if they don’t really love me? What if I am not good enough?”. And so then you will go out and do foolish things, acts of self sabotage. Worse, captive to mind, you will spend your life angry, afraid, and confuse genuine happiness with the relief of mental chatter.
Life is simple. Here is life, in three simple principles.
David Hain's insight:

What's really important - how to focus on the critical things without mental distractions getting on top...

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13 Things I Believe

13 Things I Believe | Positive futures | Scoop.it
I have taught an introduction to organizational behavior class for over 30 years-- to both undergraduate and graduate students. I first taught it as a doctoral student at The University of Michigan and taught an ever-evolving version of the class almost every year since I landed at Stanford in 1983. For many years, the final day, especially the final 20 minutes or so, felt awkward and forced as I struggled to look back on what the class had learned, provide closure, and end on an upbeat note. About 15 years ago, I experimented with an ending ritual: I passed out a list of 12 things I believe, made a brief comment about each one, and thanked the class for their efforts and for putting up with my quirks and imperfections. The list contained many beliefs that were related to the class. But they also drew on other work I hadn't mentioned in class and my general perspective on life.
David Hain's insight:

Wise life lessons!

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8 Reasons Why Money's Not Worth What You Think

8 Reasons Why Money's Not Worth What You Think | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you live for money, it’s time to get a life. The truth is, money can’t buy everything. For example, money can’t buy peace of mind, good friends, a close-knit family, work-life balance, a worry-free day, good karma, time to relax, good health, a golden anniversary, quality time with your kids, a new beginning, natural beauty, happy memories, to name just a few. Many people are actually poor because the only thing they have is money. Are you in it just for the money?
David Hain's insight:

Good thoughts from @FSonnenberg on what is really important in life...

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How to Be Successful and Still Compassionate

How to Be Successful and Still Compassionate | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Be ruthless.
As a U.S. Army recruit, that’s how Christopher L. Kukk was taught to get ahead—and it’s a philosophy you’ll hear in boardrooms, on sports teams, and even in school. The theory is that there’s only so much success to go around, and you have to aggressively compete for it.
But according to Kukk’s new book, The Compassionate Achiever: How Helping Others Fuels Success, ruthlessness is overrated. Instead, he outlines a pathway to success and achievement paved with compassion, altruism, and kindness. By following his suggestions, we can learn to cultivate compassion and reap the benefits for our productivity, our mental health, and our organizations. 
David Hain's insight:

Give more, gain more...!

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, April 6, 9:27 AM
Compassionate Achiever is not an Oxymoron!
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Is it worth the trouble? – Personal Growth – Medium

Is it worth the trouble? – Personal Growth – Medium | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We all know the ancient greek story of Sisyphus who revolted against the gods and was punished as a consequence. He was sentenced to push a boulder up a hill, just to see it roll down again, and keep doing so forever and ever and ever. Camus concludes his book with a surprising, bold statement:
“One must imagine Sisyphus happy.“

He says, Sisyphus is the perfect model for us, since he has no illusions about his pointless situation and yet revolts against the circumstances. With every descent of the rock he makes a conscious decision to give it another go. He keeps pushing that rock and recognises that this is what his existence is all about: to be truly alive, to keep pushing.
David Hain's insight:

"To be truly alive, keep pushing." Not a bad philosophy, HT @LeadershipABC!

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When Exponential Progress Becomes Reality – Niv Dror – Medium

When Exponential Progress Becomes Reality – Niv Dror – Medium | Positive futures | Scoop.it
This graph, which venture capitalist Steve Jurvetson describes as the most important concept ever to be graphed, is Kurzweil’s 110 year version of Moore’s Law. It spans across five paradigm shifts that have contributed to the exponential growth in computing.
Each dot represents the best computational price-performance device of the day, and when plotted on a logarithmic scale, they fit on the same double exponential curve that spans over a century. This is a very long lasting and predictable trend. It enables us to plan for a time beyond Moore’s Law, without knowing the specifics of the paradigm shift that’s ahead. The next paradigm will advance our ability to compute to such a massive scale, it will be beyond our current ability to comprehend.
David Hain's insight:

Some seriously amazing - and some scary - predictions by people who purport to know!

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This Is The Mind-Set You’ll Need In Order To Thrive In The Future Of Work

This Is The Mind-Set You’ll Need In Order To Thrive In The Future Of Work | Positive futures | Scoop.it
To stay competitive, we need to get comfortable making difficult, complicated, higher-order decisions more regularly—until we’ve achieved what Harvard psychologist Robert Kegan refers to as “immunity to change.”

Sound daunting? Hopeless, even? Don’t fret. It isn’t about turning yourself into a superhuman or somehow making yourself “smarter.” It simply means tapping into the potential that your mind is already hardwired to possess. Here’s how.
David Hain's insight:

Missed out on undertaking that good intention again? You probably have immunity to change - we all do!

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 20, 8:52 AM
As machine learning and other forms of #workplace automation gain ground, technical competence alone doesn’t cut it.
 
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Networkers: Are You Guilty of "Premature Solicitation"​?

Networkers: Are You Guilty of  "Premature Solicitation"​? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Liking and trusting are huge parts of any relationship, so if you're not gaining what you want from your 1-2-1 meetings, see if anything below might help:

Go with the intent to listen, not to talk. Find out about the other person. Ask questions. Be interested. Be patient. Your time will come to talk about your business. Or it won't. But even if it doesn't, your reputation as a smart, worthy professional will be maintained. And that can lead to others wanting to talk to you -- about actually buying something!
Put your products, your brochures, your whatevers away. A 1-2-1 meeting is NOT a sales call. You are not there to sell. You're there to learn, to have a two-way conversation, to see how you can help each other. Give the other person room to ask questions about you, your service, your products. Talking business is fine. Selling is not, unless someone asks.
Find ways to help. What professions does that person have synergy with? Who can you introduce them to? How does that other person help others? What can you say or do that will help the other person do better in their business?
If you show genuine interest in the other person, you'll stand out as a business professional worth knowing. You'll be memorable for all the right reasons. You might even make a sale in the future!
David Hain's insight:

Networking - I hate it! But that could be because of the way I frame it...

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