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The Millennial Survey 2013 - Deloitte

The Millennial Survey 2013 - Deloitte | Positive futures | Scoop.it
For the second year, Deloitte has commissioned The Millennial Survey to consider the views of this next generation on business and innovation and the impac

 

The members of the Millennial generation represent the future of economic, political, and social life as well as the future of business – they are our future leaders, consumers, agents of change, and hold the key to global prosperity. Restoring and enhancing the reputational capital of business therefore has a twofold importance for todayʼs business leaders – first, to address the decline in trust in business and secondly, to understand and realize the opportunities inherent in the new direction being set by the Millennial generation.


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France Lefebvre's curator insight, January 28, 2013 12:03 PM

Une étude à consulter absolument.  La génération du millénaire, ceux qui s'en viennent dans nos entreprises, nos futurs employés, leaders.  

 

2/3 des répondants disent que l'innovation est un élément clé qui fait d'une organisation un employeur de choix.  Les entreprises qui innovent seront en meilleure position pour attirer les talents.

 

Votre culture d'entreprise favorise-t-elle l'innovation?

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We don’t need to teach our kids to code, we need to teach them how to dream

We don’t need to teach our kids to code, we need to teach them how to dream | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Businesses have complained about the poor skills of school-leavers, and we’ve assumed the way forward is to ensure that more people study for longer. I think that the changing world means that we need to prepare kids in a totally different way. A 5-year-old today will enter a working world in 2030 that is so incomprehensible that we need an existential re-imagination of the very foundation of education. It’s the cliched hope of the paranoid parent that teaching Chinese will best prepare kids for a future of different power structures in geopolitics, but is that essential in a world of Google translate? Many thinking teaching kids to code is the solution, but won’t soon software be written by software? Our vision for the future needs to include more imagination. It’s staggering to me as to how much the world has changed, and how little education has. The digital age means a different world.
David Hain's insight:

We are using an ancient paradigm to teach kids for life in a new and ultra dynamic one. How short sighted is that?

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The Downsides of Being Very Emotionally Intelligent

Iis higher EQ always beneficial? Although the downside of higher EQ remains largely unexplored, there are many reasons for being cautious about a one-size-fits-all or higher-is-always-better take on EQ. Most things are better in moderation, and there is a downside to every human trait.

David Hain's insight:

Like any other skill, EQ has a potential dark side...

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How to have better political conversations

How to have better political conversations | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Robb Willer studies the forces that unite and divide us. As a social psychologist, he researches how moral values — typically a source of division — can also be used to bring people together. Willer shares compelling insights on how we might bridge the ideological divide and offers some intuitive advice on ways to be more persuasive when talking politics.
David Hain's insight:

In today's fractured and polarised society, this is valuable advice!

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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, January 23, 1:17 PM
While we tend to want to avoid political discussions, they often cannot be completely avoided. Given this reality, this is a great perspective to consider.
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Is sugar the world’s most popular drug? 

Is sugar the world’s most popular drug?  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Imagine a drug that can intoxicate us, can infuse us with energy and can be taken by mouth. It doesn’t have to be injected, smoked, or snorted for us to experience its sublime and soothing effects. Imagine that it mixes well with virtually every food and particularly liquids, and that when given to infants it provokes a feeling of pleasure so profound and intense that its pursuit becomes a driving force throughout their lives.

Could the taste of sugar on the tongue be a kind of intoxication? What about the possibility that sugar itself is an intoxicant, a drug? Overconsumption of this drug may have long-term side-effects, but there are none in the short term – no staggering or dizziness, no slurring of speech, no passing out or drifting away, no heart palpitations or respiratory distress. When it is given to children, its effects may be only more extreme variations on the apparently natural emotional rollercoaster of childhood, from the initial intoxication to the tantrums and whining of what may or may not be withdrawal a few hours later. More than anything, it makes children happy, at least for the period during which they’re consuming it. It calms their distress, eases their pain, focuses their attention and leaves them excited and full of joy until the dose wears off. The only downside is that children will come to expect another dose, perhaps to demand it, on a regular basis.
David Hain's insight:

Watch the sugar - it's insidiously addictive!

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Carl Jung On Why We Must Learn To Accept Ourselves Before We Can Help Others

Carl Jung On Why We Must Learn To Accept Ourselves Before We Can Help Others | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Carl Jung exhibited the sort of serene wisdom that is usually reserved for the reclusive-hermit-sage. Yet, he arrived at his personal “wholeness” not through the traditional route of Christian grace or Buddhist meditation, but through scientific and psychological means. Delving into his own troubled mind and reflecting on the neuroses of his patients, he arrived at an unsettling insight.

We must learn to accept our own darkness if we want to overcome our own neurosis.

Without this self-acceptance, our attempts to help others will be futile, both on an individual and global level.

Alan Watts said that Jung intimately embraced his own dark side and:

[H]e would not condemn the things in others and would therefore not be lead into those thoughts, feelings, and acts of violence towards others which are always characteristic of the people who project the devil in themselves upon the outside – upon somebody else – upon the scapegoat.
David Hain's insight:

Help can only come when a problem is acknowledged - it starts with self-acceptance - light and dark sides...!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, January 21, 7:30 PM
I always remember the insight from Jungian Robert Johnson that "the gold is in the shadow" Let's hope this is true for Brexit, Trump etc etc In the meantime we need to be accountable for 
embracing our own darkside and finding the good therein
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Why 2016 Was Actually One of the Best Years on Record

Why 2016 Was Actually One of the Best Years on Record | Positive futures | Scoop.it

By conventional wisdom, 2016 has been a horrible year. Only someone living in a cave could have missed the flood of disheartening headlines. However, if 2016 continues the global trends of previous years, it may turn out to have been one of the best years for humanity as a whole.
Those of us who live in the world of poverty research and rigorous measurement have watched many global indicators improve consistently for the past few decades. Between 1990 and 2013 (the last year for which there is good data), the number of people living in extreme poverty dropped by more than half, from 1.85 billion to 770 million. As the University of Oxford’s Max Roser recently put it, the top headline every day for the past two decades should have been: “Number of people in extreme poverty fell by 130,000 since yesterday.” At the same time, child mortality has dropped by nearly half, while literacy, vaccinations, and the number of people living in democracy have all increased.

Emergencies and bad news tend to command our attention, so it’s easy to miss humanity’s remarkable ability to improve its own lot. At the research and policy nonprofit Innovations for Poverty Action, we work with academics and field researchers to test which programs help the poor. Here are four things we’ve learned in 2016.

David Hain's insight:

Policy Action on the good things that really did happen in 2016!

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Never Stop Learning: Why True Masters Are Lifelong Students - Lindsey Pollak

Never Stop Learning: Why True Masters Are Lifelong Students - Lindsey Pollak | Positive futures | Scoop.it

As I talk to successful professionals I admire, I am often struck by one commonality: They are committed to always studying their craft. To me, it’s lifelong learning separates those who will continue to rise in their fields from those who are content to just float along.

No matter what stage of your career, having that thirst to keep learning – looking for more inspiration, more knowledge, more mastery – will be pivotal in your success. Here are three suggestions.

David Hain's insight:

The more we study and practice things that we believe are worthwhile, the better and broader we get!

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12 small lifestyle habits you can adopt to save more money

12 small lifestyle habits you can adopt to save more money | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We turned to the Quora threads, "What habit has saved you the largest amount of money?" and "What are some lifestyle changes that save money?" to round up the best — and easiest — ways people save money every day.
David Hain's insight:

Useful, crowd sourced post-Christmas advice for the New Year!

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The Top 10 Insights from the “Science of a Meaningful Life” in 2016

The Top 10 Insights from the “Science of a Meaningful Life” in 2016 | Positive futures | Scoop.it
At the start of 2016, Barbara Ehrenreich published an essay in The New York Times that took aim at the science of gratitude, criticizing it for focusing solely on benefits to oneself rather than to others. “This holiday gratitude is all about you,” she writes, “and how you can feel better.”
Nearly a year later, we can see what a false dichotomy this is. In our fifth annual Top 10 Insights from the Science of a Meaningful Life list, practices that involve thinking of other people, such as keeping a gratitude journal or performing acts of kindness, were found to bring strong personal benefits, like a healthier heart or a better sex life. And practices that seem to focus on the self, such as mindfulness and self-compassion, were linked to benefits for others, whether by fostering moral behavior or making you a better parent. 
Of course, we have argued since our founding in 2001 that our own individual well-being is intertwined with that of other people. Selfishness, greed, and hate may have seemed pervasive in 2016, but here we present evidence that compassion, generosity, and empathy are bedrocks of human behavior, essential to a meaningful life—and worth promoting and fighting for.
How did we come up with this list? We polled 350 researchers, asking them to name the findings from the science of a meaningful life that they considered most provocative, powerful, and influential. We looked at each of their nominations, to see how often the study had been cited since publication and what other people said about the finding. In the final stretch, our staff put the studies in the context of our 15 years of coverage, to see what jumped out at us as interesting or important. Here are our top choices.
David Hain's insight:

Some great articles here on research based ways to live (or not) a good life!

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What does success at work really mean?

What does success at work really mean? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
What defines a successful career? Why is it that, by conventional definitions, only the few people at the top of the ladder have successful careers, while the majority just survive and plenty fail? These questions have been been on my mind and in my heart for more than two decades, as I led the Human Resources department in several organizations. Let’s start with the first question. Let’s start with how we define a successful career.

The usual understanding of success revolves around two basic assumptions. The first: the hero of the workplace is the person who climbs all the way to the top. The second: getting to the top - winning promotion after promotion – is therefore the only thing that matters. This mindset leads us to endlessly climb the corporate ladder, adhering to the cult of physical and mental endurance to finally attain the status of corporate hero.

Does this really make sense?
David Hain's insight:

There are many heroes at work, not just those at the top! Have you questioned why being successful really means for you?

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This is How to Find Your Purpose – Better Humans

This is How to Find Your Purpose – Better Humans | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In 1958, Hunter S. Thompson was not yet famous.
He had yet to meet Johnny Depp, who would become one of his closest friends. He had yet to write Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, his most well-known novel. He hadn’t even discovered his personal style of reporting that would found the movement known as ‘gonzo journalism’.
He was, after all, only 22 years old.
Here’s what Hunter S. Thompson did do in 1958… He wrote a letter to a friend. But it wasn’t just any letter. It’s one of the most profound pieces on how to live that I have ever read.
David Hain's insight:

Meet the Great Gonzo! And more importantly, read his musings on how to live a life of purpose! Brilliant!

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, January 3, 11:16 AM

I was captivated by this letter written by American author Hunter Thompson to a friend. Most of all because he speaks to the Hallmarks of Relationship - Centered Leadership; Authenticity, Purpose, Presence, Resilience, Moral Courage and Trustworthiness. I found it encouraging, helpful and refreshing in moment in our history that may present challenges to finding our direction.

Tom Wojick's comment, January 3, 11:17 AM
Thanks for this David it's a great read and resource.
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Cities in Transition

Cities in Transition | Positive futures | Scoop.it
CommonsPolis— a civil society initiative to create dialogue between progressive municipalist movements and city governments, and European citizens — held an encounter described as “a common space for exchange; cities in transition and citizen struggles” in Paris on November 24, 2016, at the offices of the Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation (FPH) and with the collaboration of the Utopia Movement. Spanish activists from a variety of regions were invited to share with their French counterparts their recent experiences of entering the municipal public administrations, and their efforts to make the political process more participatory and inclusive for citizens. The event was held in Spanish (Castellano) and French, with simultaneous interpretation. I went along with Stacco Troncoso as observers from the P2P Foundation. We were invited to attend, listen, and share our P2P/Commons perspective about the coming political landscape.
David Hain's insight:

The activists are on the rise in local politics - and they're talking to each other!

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Why are there still so many jobs?

Why are there still so many jobs? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Here's a paradox you don't hear much about: despite a century of creating machines to do our work for us, the proportion of adults in the US with a job has consistently gone up for the past 125 years. Why hasn't human labor become redundant and our skills obsolete? In this talk about the future of work, economist David Autor addresses the question of why there are still so many jobs and comes up with a surprising, hopeful answer.
David Hain's insight:

An optimistic view about the rise of the robots!

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IBM Just Posted 5 Predictions About What Life Will Be Like in 2022

IBM Just Posted 5 Predictions About What Life Will Be Like in 2022 | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Technology giant IBM is known for of making bold predictions about the future, and it's just announced its latest "5 in 5" list, highlighting the five innovations that they think will have the biggest impact on our lives over the next five years.

According to the company, in only a few years, we're set to see huge developments in artificial intelligence (AI), ultra-powerful telescopes, smart sensors, and medical devices - with benefits ranging from healthcare and the environment, to our understanding of Earth and the Universe itself.


Of course, all these predictions are based on technology and research developments that are happening right now - there's no way of knowing what else might crop up in the next five years.

But take a look at this vision of the near future, and you might want to check back in once 2022 hits, just to see if the scientists got it right.
David Hain's insight:

AI to give us superhero powers within 5 years! Hype, or evidence based prediction? probably somewhere between the two...

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Charles Bukowski: The Slavery of the 9 to 5 – Personal Growth – Medium

Charles Bukowski: The Slavery of the 9 to 5 – Personal Growth – Medium | Positive futures | Scoop.it

In 1969, an offer came to hell.
Quit your job, and I’ll give you $100 a month for the rest of your life.
The offer came from John Martin, publisher and founder of Black Sparrow Press. Charles Bukowski — still an unknown writer — had spent his last decade at a “soul-wrenching” post office job.
He wanted out.
In a letter at the time, Bukowski wrote:
“I have one of two choices — stay in the post office and go crazy … or stay out here and play at writer and starve. I have decided to starve.

 

15 Years later, Bukowski wrote this letter of thanks.  It contains a good deal of wisdom.

David Hain's insight:

How one man got unexpected help to find his purpose!

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Are Your Happiness Goals Too High?

Are Your Happiness Goals Too High? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In our competitive culture, we usually think “more is better.” Being Number One, winning at all costs, and “having the most” is deeply ingrained in our psyche as real success. This model of going for the max is often erroneously applied to our own well-being. People mistakenly think intense delight is a sign that their attempt at awakening joy is truly successful.
However, when we look for bells and whistles as indications of true happiness we’re misunderstanding a very important principle: Setting a high bar of intense happiness works against true well-being. Although I’m all for enjoying peak experiences when they arise, measuring that ideal against a moderate level of okayness can easily render this moment as “not good enough.”

We find what we look for. Science calls this phenomenon the brain’s “confirmation bias.” Your brain tends to see what it believes to be true and misses whatever doesn’t confirm its hypothesis. If you don’t think you experience much true happiness because you’re holding an image that it should be a peak experience of ecstasy, you probably will keep confirming that belief.
What’s the alternative? Aim for noticing how you really feel right at that moment—and embrace all your diverse feelings.
David Hain's insight:

Worry more about how you are now than whether your pursuit of happiness is succeeding!

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23 Things Everyone Can Do To Create A Life-changing Morning Routine

23 Things Everyone Can Do To Create A Life-changing Morning Routine | Positive futures | Scoop.it
There are five important things you would want to achieve in the morning:
1. Become Alert 
2. Take care of your emotional state 
3. Take care of your intellectual state 
4. Take care of your health
5. Work on an activity that supports your long-term goals
There are numerous things you can do in order to achieve these five things.
I’ve managed to compile universal activities, based on the research and personal experimentation.
So let’s start.
David Hain's insight:

Mornings are important, because the day follows. Some ideas to improve your morning routine...

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13 Things You Should Avoid Telling Yourself Every Day

13 Things You Should Avoid Telling Yourself Every Day | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It takes almost no time to find articles and stories that will tell you about the good habits or motivational mantras of people who have achieved success in their chosen field.
But, as interesting and inspirational as those articles can be, they only tell half of the story.
Many people will read them and instead of being inspired, come away with a dejected and defeated feeling.
“I’ll never be like those successful people,” they say to themselves. “They’re way more committed than I am.”
That’s negative self-talk. We’re all guilty of it from time to time.
There are at least four different types of negative self-talk: filtering, personalizing, catastrophizing and polarizing.
Here’s a sample of some of the things we may say to ourselves — things that serve only to steer us off the road to success.
David Hain's insight:

Fixed mindset --> self destructive habits. Good infographic with head-phrases to watch out for!

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When You Are Depressed, Make Something. – Be Yourself

When You Are Depressed, Make Something. – Be Yourself | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Depression doesn’t discriminate. Everyone is a potential target for it, regardless of gender, age, ethnicity, geographical location, or income. We are all subject to its grasp, and remember, it’s not the same thing as sadness.
Sadness is when you feel down because things aren’t going your way. Depression is when you feel down even when all is going well.
David Hain's insight:

1 in 4 of us will suffer this way. When it happens, put something out (words, music, art) rather than taking something in (drink, pills, bingewatch)!

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Japanese company replaces office workers with artificial intelligence

Japanese company replaces office workers with artificial intelligence | Positive futures | Scoop.it
A future in which human workers are replaced by machines is about to become a reality at an insurance firm in Japan, where more than 30 employees are being laid off and replaced with an artificial intelligence system that can calculate payouts to policyholders.

Fukoku Mutual Life Insurance believes it will increase productivity by 30% and see a return on its investment in less than two years. The firm said it would save about 140m yen (£1m) a year after the 200m yen (£1.4m) AI system is installed this month. Maintaining it will cost about 15m yen (£100k) a year.

The move is unlikely to be welcomed, however, by 34 employees who will be made redundant by the end of March.
David Hain's insight:

The future is already here - and it's a grim taste of a potential new reality!

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Bosses vs. Leaders: Companies Need Neither

Bosses vs. Leaders: Companies Need Neither | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It was just a couple of hours ago that I saw an illustration here on my news stream on LinkedIn, about the differences between "the boss" and "the leader". Most of us have probably seen this kind of visual many times before: They invariably argue for "bosses becoming more like leaders", for "leaders becoming more transformational", or for companies to not have bosses altogether. Now, let´s look at this line of thinking a little bit closer.
David Hain's insight:

Debunking the boss vs. leader debate!

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The Value of Doing Things That Scare You

You’re no doubt familiar with the dictum to “do one thing every day that scares you.”

The quotation is often misattributed to Eleanor Roosevelt, who said something far more meaningful (if less meme-able):

“You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, ‘I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.’ You must do the thing you think you cannot do.”
The directive to “face your fears” is often boiled down to platitudes: Doing scary things helps you grow! The magic happens outside your comfort zone! Well-meaning though the sentiments may be, they’re unhelpful without the why.

And because fear serves a real and important purpose — keeping us out of harm’s way — the directive to frighten ourselves on purpose is fraught.

So what’s the scientific case to be made for doing things that scare you?

David Hain's insight:

How (and why) to expose yourself productively!

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How Technology Is Enabling the Rise of the One-Person Business

How Technology Is Enabling the Rise of the One-Person Business | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The gig economy has come a long way in the past decade, but its best days are yet to come. These three technologies will continue to evolve, and it’s only a matter of time before companies of all sizes meaningfully gravitate toward hiring more one-person businesses to cut costs, increase productivity, and gain the ability to quickly scale up or down based on their real-time needs.
David Hain's insight:

A positive view of the gig economy!

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How to Teach Your Kids about the Brain 

How to Teach Your Kids about the Brain  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
When children understand what’s happening in the brain, it can be the first step to having the power to make choices. Knowledge can be equally powerful to parents too. Knowing how the brain works means we can also understand how to respond when our children need our help.

Sometimes our brains can become overwhelmed with feelings of fear, sadness or anger, and when this happens, it’s confusing—especially to children. So giving children ways to make sense of what’s happening in their brain is important. It’s also helpful for children to have a vocabulary for their emotional experiences that others can understand. Think of it like a foreign language, and if the other people in your family speak that language too, then it’s easier to communicate with them.

So how do you start these conversations with your children, make it playful enough to keep them engaged, and simple enough for them to understand?

Here is how I teach children (and parents) how to understand the brain.
David Hain's insight:

The Upstairs, Downstairs of the brain - useful for adults as well as kids!

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Compassion Is Weaved Throughout Our Nervous System, Researchers Have Found

Compassion Is Weaved Throughout Our Nervous System, Researchers Have Found | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Nietzsche saw compassion as an utter failing. If you were really compassionate, you would wish sickness, difficulty, hardship, and woe on your friends, as these were the only things that helped them develop, making them stronger and smarter. With the advent of psychology, we began to see the environment’s influence and that of our upbringing. Loving parents for instance brought up compassionate children, while self-centered one’s bred selfish offspring.

Now, evolutionary science is weighing in, and finds that compassion may have developed as an evolutionary advantage which helped our species survive and thrive. This isn’t a new concept. Darwin himself in The Descent of Man argues that sympathy and compassion are some of humanities strongest traits. Instead, Darwin’s “Survival of the fittest” was taken to mean that humans are naturally competitive, and overwhelmingly motivated by self-interest.
David Hain's insight:

Science is revealing more about our need to show compassion. Let's show it some more in 2017!

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