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Nicholas Stern: 'I got it wrong on climate change – it's far, far worse' - The Guardian

Nicholas Stern: 'I got it wrong on climate change – it's far, far worse' - The Guardian | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The Guardian Nicholas Stern: 'I got it wrong on climate change – it's far, far worse' The Guardian Lord Stern, author of the government-commissioned review on climate change that became the reference work for politicians and green campaigners, now...
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Chilling warning!

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Mindset matters - what’s it all about and why it matters

Mindset matters - what’s it all about and why it matters | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Do you find yourself stuck doing your job the way you always have? Are you well-suited to your role: it matches your talents and abilities, and you like to be in a role you can succeed at?

Or do you like a challenge, and prefer to take the risky role rather than the sure bet? These types of thoughts and strategies may be the result of your mindset. And you might want to review that mindset and your own beliefs in the light of research on talent and success.

David Hain's insight:

Mindset matters! And you can change it...

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Accepting These 6 Painful Truths Will Make You a Better Leader

Accepting These 6 Painful Truths Will Make You a Better Leader | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The real truth is that although leaders experience many joyful moments, there are these moments of disappointment as well.
David Hain's insight:

Some useful reality checks about how leadership really is...

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Why We’re Post-Fact | Peter Pomerantsev | Granta Magazine

Why We’re Post-Fact | Peter Pomerantsev | Granta Magazine | Positive futures | Scoop.it
As his army blatantly annexed Crimea, Vladimir Putin went on TV and, with a smirk, told the world there were no Russian soldiers in Ukraine. He wasn’t lying so much as saying the truth doesn’t matter. And when Donald Trump makes up facts on a whim, claims that he saw thousands of Muslims in New Jersey cheering the Twin Towers coming down, or that the Mexican government purposefully sends ‘bad’ immigrants to the US, when fact-checking agencies rate 78% of his statements untrue but he still becomes a US Presidential candidate – then it appears that facts no longer matter much in the land of the free. When the Brexit campaign announces ‘Let’s give our NHS the £350 million the EU takes every week’ and, on winning the referendum, the claim is shrugged off as a ‘mistake’ by one Brexit leader while another explains it as ‘an aspiration’, then it’s clear we are living in a ‘post-fact’ or ‘post-truth’ world. Not merely a world where politicians and media lie – they have always lied – but one where they don’t care whether they tell the truth or not.

How did we get here? Is it due to technology? Economic globalisation? The culmination of the history of philosophy? There is some sort of teenage joy in throwing off the weight of facts – those heavy symbols of education and authority, reminders of our place and limitations – but why is this rebellion happening right now?
David Hain's insight:

How we appear to be happier with a good lie that plays into popular emotions than the truth! A worrying trend well journaled here!

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10 Websites To Learn Something New In 30 Minutes A Day

10 Websites To Learn Something New In 30 Minutes A Day | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Learning something new is always an exciting endeavour to commence. The problem is that most of us get wrapped up in busy distractions throughout the day so that we can never find the time to learn the new skill we want.

What’s worse is that some of us spend hours learning this new skill only to give up after a few months, which is precious time that goes down the toilet.

Luckily, there’s a better solution.

Instead of using our time to sit through long lectures and lengthy video courses, we can take advantage of all the amazing websites that can help us learn a new skill in 30 minutes or less.

We’ve collected the best sites that teach a diversified list of topics and have decided to share them with you here today. Enjoy!
David Hain's insight:

Excellent connection to learning resources!

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A Simple 6 Step Self Compassion Exercise to Combat Depression and Low Self Esteem

A Simple 6 Step Self Compassion Exercise to Combat Depression and Low Self Esteem | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s all too easy to be extremely tough on ourselves; we need – at points – to get better at self-compassion. Here is an exercise in how to lessen the voices of self-flagellation.
David Hain's insight:

You're human too - worth remembering and acting upon to be at your best with everybody!

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The 5 Major Mind Traps that Hinder Happiness - Mindful

The 5 Major Mind Traps that Hinder Happiness - Mindful | Positive futures | Scoop.it
These roadblocks keep us stuck in the depression loop: caught up in negative thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as the brain anxiously rehashes past events and simultaneously rehearses a hopeless, catastrophic future. Here are some ways to avoid falling into these traps.
David Hain's insight:

Our minds have many voices. Beware, some are malicious!

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5 Best Mindfulness Books For Amazing Benefits

5 Best Mindfulness Books For Amazing Benefits | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Remember this mantra when you go in for anything new: What it does is more important than what it is.

You should always be more interested in what a thing does than what it is. You should be even more interested in knowing if what you’re asked to believe in, is their belief as well. You wouldn’t pay a small fortune to buy a slimming course from a fat guy, right?

This post isn’t about books that explain what mindfulness is. Instead, these books here are about what mindfulness can help you with — one book focusing on one benefit. These books are about the benefits of mindfulness that I believe in. I can even daresay that these are the best books on the practical uses of mindfulness by any yardstick. What you can get from these is a deep insight into mindfulness without tangling up your brain wires.
David Hain's insight:

What mindfulness can do, in 5 books via the Happiness Project of India!

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How to raise $170 million for a crazy idea 

How to raise $170 million for a crazy idea  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
At the origin of Solar Impulse in 2002, there was no money, no team and no technology. Nothing more than a crazy idea of achieving the first-ever solar flight around the world, with the objective of promoting clean solutions for a more sustainable world through a spectacular adventure. In the end, funds from marketing budgets and committed individuals have financed 13 years of research and development.
David Hain's insight:

A story of idealism and vision fulfilled! And it's not over yet ....there is still a place for odysseys in this crazy world!

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Your Brain Has A "Delete" Button--Here's How To Use It

Your Brain Has A "Delete" Button--Here's How To Use It | Positive futures | Scoop.it
There’s an old saying in neuroscience: neurons that fire together wire together. This means the more you run a neuro-circuit in your brain, the stronger that circuit becomes. This is why, to quote another old saw, practice makes perfect. The more you practice piano, or speaking a language, or juggling, the stronger those circuits get.

The ability to learn is about more than building and strengthening neural connections.
For years this has been the focus for learning new things. But as it turns out, the ability to learn is about more than building and strengthening neural connections. Even more important is our ability to break down the old ones. It's called "synaptic pruning." Here’s how it works.
David Hain's insight:

What we think, we become. A suggestion form neuroscience to make that work for you!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, July 15, 8:12 PM
Very wise advice "Be mindful of what your mindful of"
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 19, 4:55 AM
Your Brain Has A "Delete" Button--Here's How To Use It
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Goliath, the flower seller

Goliath, the flower seller | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“Giants are not what we think they are. The same qualities that appear to give them strength are often the sources of great weakness.” - Malcolm Gladwell, on his book: "David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants".
David Hain's insight:

Goliath, a fable about humanity...

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Everyone Suffers from Imposter Syndrome — Here’s How to Handle It

Everyone Suffers from Imposter Syndrome — Here’s How to Handle It | Positive futures | Scoop.it
One of the greatest barriers to moving outside your comfort zone is the fear that you’re a poser, that you’re not worthy, that you couldn’t possibly be qualified to do whatever you’re aiming to do. It’s a fear that strikes many of us: impostor syndrome.

I know I’ve certainly had those thoughts while publishing pieces of writing, whether it’s blogs or books. I’ve had them while teaching my first university classes and giving speeches to corporate audiences. I appear confident on the outside but feel deeply insecure on the inside, wondering who I am to be stepping up to this stage. What could I possibly have to say that anyone would want to hear?

And I’m not alone. Actress (and Harvard alum) Natalie Portman described the self-doubt she experienced as a Harvard student in a poignant commencement speech several years ago. “I felt like there had been some mistake,” she said, “that I wasn’t smart enough to be in this company, and that every time I opened my mouth I would have to prove that I wasn’t just a dumb actress.” Howard Schultz, the chair, president, and CEO of Starbucks revealed that he, and CEOs he knows, feel the same way: “Very few people, whether you’ve been in that job before or not, get into the seat and believe today that they are now qualified to be the CEO. They’re not going to tell you that, but it’s true.”

What can you do to overcome these feelings of inadequacy that so many of us experience?
David Hain's insight:

Overcoming 'Impostor Syndrome' - it's not just you, and it can be beaten!

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How computers are learning to be creative

How computers are learning to be creative | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We're on the edge of a new frontier in art and creativity -- and it's not human. Blaise Agüera y Arcas, principal scientist at Google, works with deep neural networks for machine perception and distributed learning. In this captivating demo, he shows how neural nets trained to recognize images can be run in reverse, to generate them. The results: spectacular, hallucinatory collages (and poems!) that defy categorization. "Perception and creativity are very intimately connected," Agüera y Arcas says. "Any creature, any being that is able to do perceptual acts is also able to create."

Via Françoise Morvan
David Hain's insight:

So computers will become creative...Wow!

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, July 13, 7:28 PM

This is geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Juan Doming.

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Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives

Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love. Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success. Much of that understanding stems from the work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, synthesized in her remarkably insightful Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (public library) — an inquiry into the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives.

One of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves, Dweck found in her research, has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality.
David Hain's insight:

If you haven't done so already, please read this book or at leat investigate the article. Should be taught at every school across the world...

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Stephanie Marie's comment, July 11, 11:45 AM
I love the idea of the growth mindset! Dweck's book has been on my reading list I just have gotten around to reading it! That being said, your question on our post was to about whether or not telling a student they are gifted could be damaging to them...I think it depends. If you tell a child they are gifted or smart and then do nothing to challenge them, I believe that can be damaging and that is what a fixed mindset does. However, by identifying a student as gifted, you draw attention to the fact that this student needs to be challenged and has a talent that needs to be developed. The idea that their talent/intelligence can grow and develop is a growth mindset. Another part of the growth/fixed mindset is being aware of how you praise that student. Saying, "Of course you got an A, Johnny - you're so smart!" does nothing to reinforce the time and effort Johnny put into his work and is an example of a fixed mindset. In a growth mindset, it is better to praise specifically and praise the process rather than the product. "Johnny, I really liked the introduction to your paper and how you were willing to edit it in multiple drafts," is specific and highlights the work Johnny put into it.
Brook Croat's comment, July 11, 4:00 PM
The topic of the growth vs. fixed mindset was first brought to my attention through a TED Talk last year, and it's still just as interesting as it was then! By far the scariest/most interesting part of this article was when they discussed the effects of the study with young children. Immediately seeing the negative consequences of promoting a fixed mindset is a wake-up call as to just how much of an effect we have on our students. I hope keep this topic in mind in the future and work hard to encourage a growth mindset with my students. Thanks for sharing!
Grace Briese's comment, July 12, 11:06 AM
Good point Stephanie. I was kind of making an assumption that once you tell a student that they are gifted, you are reinforcing the fixed mindset that they should be preforming at a certain level simply because they are gifted (not for effort). But you are right, reinforcing a gifted student's process and effort and encouraging that growth mindset can/should still be done once they are identified as gifted....
So much for me to still explore on this topic- I just bought the book myself. Thanks for the input!
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Where machines could replace humans--and where they can’t (yet) | McKinsey 

Where machines could replace humans--and where they can’t (yet) | McKinsey  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
As automation technologies such as machine learning and robotics play an increasingly great role in everyday life, their potential effect on the workplace has, unsurprisingly, become a major focus of research and public concern. The discussion tends toward a Manichean guessing game: which jobs will or won’t be replaced by machines?

In fact, as our research has begun to show, the story is more nuanced. While automation will eliminate very few occupations entirely in the next decade, it will affect portions of almost all jobs to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the type of work they entail. Automation, now going beyond routine manufacturing activities, has the potential, as least with regard to its technical feasibility, to transform sectors such as healthcare and finance, which involve a substantial share of knowledge work.
David Hain's insight:

Automation - it's here and growing, like it or not! Might as well learn about it...

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How The Digital Economy Is Defining An Entire Generation

How The Digital Economy Is Defining An Entire Generation | Positive futures | Scoop.it

In this fast-moving, highly technical era, innovation and technology are ubiquitous, forcing companies to deliver immediate value to consumers. This principle is ingrained in us – it’s stark reality. One day, a brand is a world leader, promising incredible change. Then just a few weeks later, it disappears. Millennials view leaders of the emerging (digital) economy as scrappy, agile, and comfortable making decisions that disrupt the norm, and that may or may not pan out.

What does it take to earn the attention of Millennials? Here are three things you should consider:

David Hain's insight:

Inspiring the millennial generation - some tips...

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Soft Skills Secrets: Lady Diana

Soft Skills Secrets: Lady Diana | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Diana said “I see myself as a princess for the world, not the Princess of Wales” and when we consider that from 1981 onwards Diana became one of the most famous, photographed women in the world, that she was able to encourage the public at large to view her as ‘normal’ or with a kind of ‘special ordinariness’ is actually rather amazing. Diana said: “I want my boys to have an understanding of people's emotions, their insecurities, people's distress, and their hopes and dreams”.

By identifying so strongly with others, Diana was able to help others to identify with her and this is something that we can all strive to achieve. As you take each rung up the ladder, the further away you can become from the hopes and dreams of the people that you represent, becoming so far removed from the reality of their day to day struggles that you can no longer empathise or understand. Distance does not have to be a by-product of advancement.
David Hain's insight:

Diana - not a bad role model for people who want to learn how to connect with others!

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The Psychological Benefits of Writing Regularly

The Psychological Benefits of Writing Regularly | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“Research by Laura King shows that writing about achieving future goals and dreams can make people happier and healthier... And Jane Dutton and I found that when people doing stressful fundraising jobs kept a journal for a few days about how their work made a difference, they increased their hourly effort by 29% over the next two weeks.”
David Hain's insight:

How writing can keep you sane, positive and insightful!

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Don't Assume People Know Your Expectations

Don't Assume People Know Your Expectations | Positive futures | Scoop.it
My mom often used to say to me, “I’m not a mind reader. You have to talk to me. You may think I know what you’re thinking, but I don’t.”  The same is true for your employees—they can’t read your minds, which means you have to communicate with them!

David Hain's insight:

A significant percentage of conflict is caused by expectation mismatches. So expectation management is an important subject!

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What is Positive Psychology?

What is Positive Psychology? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“Positive psychology is the scientific study of what makes life worth living. It is the empirical exploration of how people, institutions and communities flourish, and is based on the premise that mere absence of illness is not conducive to well-being and a fulfilling life.

“In order to increase our knowledge of the determinants of ´the good life´, positive psychology seeks to understand all the domains of human experience related to our well-being, and is relentlessly pursuing new channels through which to do so. It rests soundly within the field of psychology and is best acknowledged for its contribution in focusing attention and resources to the study of topics such as hope, wisdom, creativity, future-mindedness, courage, spirituality, responsibility, resilience and perseverance. Positive psychology strives to discover what well-being and happiness are, not merely in terms of positive emotion and pleasure, but in term of living a good life.

“Positive psychology is not about fake smiles, telling people to ´just be happy´ and to deny the existence of genuine hardships. What positive psychology does tell us is that when (not if) we encounter challenges or extreme hardship, we do not need to be unarmed and unprepared for the trial ahead. We can educate ourselves about what makes us more resilient, mentally strong and optimistic, and cultivate response models which enable us to meet adversity with mindful observation and contemplation. The science and wisdom of positive psychology is about using your strengths and the knowledge acquired through past experiences to push through the turbulence, and to even harness it to elevate you up to higher altitudes. Nobody lives only to be free of anxiety and illness. A life well lived consists of other elements than those which contribute to merely surviving, and these are the matters which positive psychology seeks to understand.” – Emilia Lahti
David Hain's insight:

What positive psychology does, and why it complements other aspects of the discipline.

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Stress Literally Shrinks Your Brain: 7 Ways To Reverse The Damage - Forbes

Stress Literally Shrinks Your Brain: 7 Ways To Reverse The Damage - Forbes | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s not impossible to reduce your stress levels; you just need to make managing stress a higher priority if you want to reverse this effect. The sooner you start managing your stress effectively, the easier it will be to keep unexpected stress from causing damage in the future.

“The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another.” –William James

Luckily, the plasticity of the brain allows it to mold, change, and rebuild damaged areas as you practice new behaviors. So implementing healthy stress-relieving techniques can train your brain to handle stress more effectively and decrease the likelihood of ill effects from stress in the future.
David Hain's insight:

The secret to a fulfilling life's in our heads. We were wired to succeed, said Darwin. Neurology is showing us how to do so thoughtfully!

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Turning the brain green

Turning the brain green | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Could a better understanding of the brain’s reward system — a network fine-tuned over millions of years and laser-focused on survival — help mankind skirt environmental disaster?

Ann-Christine Duhaime thinks it’s entirely possible. As part of her 2015-2016 Radcliffe fellowship, the Harvard Medical School professor and neurosurgeon studied whether the brain’s inherited drive for stuff and stimulation is making it hard for humans to get by with less, and harming the planet in the process. Her research suggests the answer is yes, and that curbing consumption will require tapping other types of rewards the brain craves.

“Our brain evolved with this wonderful system, but now it doesn’t know when to stop,” said Duhaime, Harvard’s Nicholas T. Zervas Professor of Neurosurgery, during a recent Radcliffe talk. “And so now your urges to eat get you into trouble, and your urges to get stuff are getting the planet into trouble.”

David Hain's insight:

How we can train our brains to think greener and resist oarlock of impulse control!

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Trust Requires Admitting Errors

Trust Requires Admitting Errors | Positive futures | Scoop.it
52 Ideas That You Can Implement to Build Trust

Nadine Hack offers this week's advice. Nadine is both a Top Thought Leader in Trust and a member of our Trust Alliance.

Be transparent about what's working and what's not. 

The impulse to “cover up” things that are not working so well is strong. But whether you're internal or external stakeholders, everyone appreciates and responds better to honesty. 

Leaders fear that if their initial decision is not panning out well, they will lose the confidence of their stakeholders. If you try to “sweep problems under the rug” or “fudge” on your reporting, this will be true.

If instead, you openly, candidly admit an error of judgment or acknowledge unanticipated events that make no longer valid what was a correct determination under different circumstances, your stakeholders will respect and trust you even more.

They will know they can count on the accuracy of your information when you share positive updates and they will be more likely to support your efforts regardless of outcomes at any specific moment.
David Hain's insight:

Great advice from @Nadine Hackabout how to open up not cover up, via @Barbara Kimmel's excellent Trust Alliance!

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10 Books To Make You Think About the Way You Think

10 Books To Make You Think About the Way You Think | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Reflecting on our beliefs and motives, decisions and reactions,  helps us grow. Here are a few titles from the arenas of Human and Social Behavior that offer insight into our psyches. [Originally published on Tech Insider.]
David Hain's insight:

Thinking skills are a critical component of 21C capability. Some reading material here to improve them!

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What's Your Memory Style? 5 Ways to Accommodate the Way Your Brain Works  

What's Your Memory Style? 5 Ways to Accommodate the Way Your Brain Works   | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Not all memory is created equal. While some of us have detailed, context-dependent accounts of when and where we learned something, others seem to have a reserve of facts in their brain that they can pull from, independent of the original context in which they learned the information. Why does memory differ from person to person in this way, and how does it affect learning? A research team from the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences is on the path to finding out.

Via Roger Francis
David Hain's insight:

Learning more about how our brains work is a genuine WHE factor for a successful life!

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Creating a Latticework of Mental Models: An Introduction

Creating a Latticework of Mental Models: An Introduction | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Acquiring knowledge may seem like a daunting task. There is so much to know and time is precious. Luckily, we don’t have to master everything.

To get the biggest bang for our buck we can study the big ideas from the big disciplines: physics, biology, psychology, philosophy, literature, sociology, history, and a few others. We call these big ideas mental models.

Our aim is not to remember facts and try to repeat them when asked, the way you studied for your high school history exams. We’re going to try and hang these ideas on a latticework of mental models, with vivid examples in our head to help us remember and apply them.
David Hain's insight:

Very useful 101 on key ideas for life...

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