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The Opportunity of Seeing the World Differently | Becoming Minimalist

The Opportunity of Seeing the World Differently | Becoming Minimalist | Positive futures | Scoop.it

"When old patterns are broken, new worlds emerge.”– Tuli Kupferberg

 

I am still amazed at the fullness of life that minimalism and simplicity offer: freedom, opportunity, meaning. I wish I had found it sooner. Unfortunately, for most of my life, I had been told something different. I had been told that joy could be found in material success—that the more I owned, the happier I would be. But they were wrong. I’m far happier today owning less than I ever was pursuing more.

 

Which got me wondering… what if some of the other messages I have been told are also wrong? What if some of the other views of the world promoted by our culture and society don’t actually lead to joy and fulfillment? What if true meaning and passion is found in the opposite?

 

What if there is unspeakable opportunity in beginning to see the world differently?"

 


Via Brad Abbott
David Hain's insight:

Less is more - a mantra I have to keep reminding myself about but always worthwhile doing so.

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donhornsby's curator insight, January 9, 2013 9:15 AM

Less is more - a mantra I have to keep reminding myself about but always worthwhile doing so.

 

(From the article): What if there is unspeakable opportunity in beginning to see the world differently?

Mercor's curator insight, January 9, 2013 11:56 AM

Rescooped by David Hain from Zenatude onto Positive futures

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Psychiatrists Map Your Brain's Reaction in Social Settings • Six Seconds

Psychiatrists Map Your Brain's Reaction in Social Settings • Six Seconds | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Read Montague is director of the Human Neuroimaging Lab and Computational Psychiatry Unit at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute where he is pioneering the field of computational psychiatry, a new discipline which is trying to map social reactions and create a kind of “Periodic Table” for the human mind.
He was recently interviewed on the science radio show, “Pulse of the Planet.” Hear the interview here:
Scientists on Dr. Montague’s team hooked people up to brain imaging devices similar to MRIs and mapped the activity of their brain as they performed simple social interactions such as trading things or seeking information. They used a new method called hyperscanning which allows multiple subjects, each on a separate MRI scanner, to interact with one another while their brains are simultaneously scanned. This technology allows researchers to study the brain responses that underlie important social interactions, and begin to quantify and categorize them, creating a “Periodic Table” of the mind.
David Hain's insight:

Imagine - a periodic table of the mind...!

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12 Signs You’re Disrespecting Yourself (and How to Stop) - The Minds Journal

12 Signs You’re Disrespecting Yourself (and How to Stop) - The Minds Journal | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“How people treat other people is a direct reflection how they feel about themselves” – Paulo Coelho
Every relationship we have, can be viewed as a reflection of the relationship we have with ourselves and setting the tone for the right relationships, lies heavily upon us. By trusting ourselves, listening to our own thoughts, feelings and emotions, we become more authentic and this gives us the wonderful opportunity to become comfortable in our own skin. Yet, when we are not comfortable with who we are, we project onto others, what we cannot accept of ourselves.
David Hain's insight:

Some food for thought about personal blind spots...

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 7, 2:41 AM
It might be a good starting point in a self-management project...
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Science Says Humans Now Have Shorter Attention Spans Than Goldfish--This Is How You Can Fix That

Science Says Humans Now Have Shorter Attention Spans Than Goldfish--This Is How You Can Fix That | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The only time you can change your behavior is right now. You can't undo that mistake you made last week. And you can't fast forward into next week to change the outcome of your life.

All you can do is change how you're behaving in this very moment. But you can't change your actions unless you're fully present in the here-and-now.

When you're dialed in on what you're doing right now, all your brainpower can be used wisely. And that's the key to performing at your peak.
David Hain's insight:

Digital warp speed is compelling but disorienting. Here is the antidote!

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7 Ways To Handle Criticism Like An Expert

7 Ways To Handle Criticism Like An Expert | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Boy, do we know how to handle criticism?

No. You don’t. I’m sorry, but you rather suck at handling criticism.

The truth is, you and I don’t know how to handle an opinion that finds a fault in us. Just like most of those around us. Okay. Now that the hardest thing to say is over, why not just sit down and let it brew?
David Hain's insight:

Such an important quality - limited growth without it!

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Where machines could replace humans--and where they can’t (yet) | McKinsey 

Where machines could replace humans--and where they can’t (yet) | McKinsey  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
As automation technologies such as machine learning and robotics play an increasingly great role in everyday life, their potential effect on the workplace has, unsurprisingly, become a major focus of research and public concern. The discussion tends toward a Manichean guessing game: which jobs will or won’t be replaced by machines?

In fact, as our research has begun to show, the story is more nuanced. While automation will eliminate very few occupations entirely in the next decade, it will affect portions of almost all jobs to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the type of work they entail. Automation, now going beyond routine manufacturing activities, has the potential, as least with regard to its technical feasibility, to transform sectors such as healthcare and finance, which involve a substantial share of knowledge work.
David Hain's insight:

Automation - it's here and growing, like it or not! Might as well learn about it...

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How The Digital Economy Is Defining An Entire Generation

How The Digital Economy Is Defining An Entire Generation | Positive futures | Scoop.it

In this fast-moving, highly technical era, innovation and technology are ubiquitous, forcing companies to deliver immediate value to consumers. This principle is ingrained in us – it’s stark reality. One day, a brand is a world leader, promising incredible change. Then just a few weeks later, it disappears. Millennials view leaders of the emerging (digital) economy as scrappy, agile, and comfortable making decisions that disrupt the norm, and that may or may not pan out.

What does it take to earn the attention of Millennials? Here are three things you should consider:

David Hain's insight:

Inspiring the millennial generation - some tips...

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Khalid's curator insight, July 30, 4:36 PM

Understanding the new generation behaviors is important to the success of the digital transformation of the business. They are the leaders in the digital space and businesses need to understand their needs. The key is in simplifying the service.  

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Soft Skills Secrets: Lady Diana

Soft Skills Secrets: Lady Diana | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Diana said “I see myself as a princess for the world, not the Princess of Wales” and when we consider that from 1981 onwards Diana became one of the most famous, photographed women in the world, that she was able to encourage the public at large to view her as ‘normal’ or with a kind of ‘special ordinariness’ is actually rather amazing. Diana said: “I want my boys to have an understanding of people's emotions, their insecurities, people's distress, and their hopes and dreams”.

By identifying so strongly with others, Diana was able to help others to identify with her and this is something that we can all strive to achieve. As you take each rung up the ladder, the further away you can become from the hopes and dreams of the people that you represent, becoming so far removed from the reality of their day to day struggles that you can no longer empathise or understand. Distance does not have to be a by-product of advancement.
David Hain's insight:

Diana - not a bad role model for people who want to learn how to connect with others!

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The Psychological Benefits of Writing Regularly

The Psychological Benefits of Writing Regularly | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“Research by Laura King shows that writing about achieving future goals and dreams can make people happier and healthier... And Jane Dutton and I found that when people doing stressful fundraising jobs kept a journal for a few days about how their work made a difference, they increased their hourly effort by 29% over the next two weeks.”
David Hain's insight:

How writing can keep you sane, positive and insightful!

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Don't Assume People Know Your Expectations

Don't Assume People Know Your Expectations | Positive futures | Scoop.it
My mom often used to say to me, “I’m not a mind reader. You have to talk to me. You may think I know what you’re thinking, but I don’t.”  The same is true for your employees—they can’t read your minds, which means you have to communicate with them!

David Hain's insight:

A significant percentage of conflict is caused by expectation mismatches. So expectation management is an important subject!

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What is Positive Psychology?

What is Positive Psychology? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
“Positive psychology is the scientific study of what makes life worth living. It is the empirical exploration of how people, institutions and communities flourish, and is based on the premise that mere absence of illness is not conducive to well-being and a fulfilling life.

“In order to increase our knowledge of the determinants of ´the good life´, positive psychology seeks to understand all the domains of human experience related to our well-being, and is relentlessly pursuing new channels through which to do so. It rests soundly within the field of psychology and is best acknowledged for its contribution in focusing attention and resources to the study of topics such as hope, wisdom, creativity, future-mindedness, courage, spirituality, responsibility, resilience and perseverance. Positive psychology strives to discover what well-being and happiness are, not merely in terms of positive emotion and pleasure, but in term of living a good life.

“Positive psychology is not about fake smiles, telling people to ´just be happy´ and to deny the existence of genuine hardships. What positive psychology does tell us is that when (not if) we encounter challenges or extreme hardship, we do not need to be unarmed and unprepared for the trial ahead. We can educate ourselves about what makes us more resilient, mentally strong and optimistic, and cultivate response models which enable us to meet adversity with mindful observation and contemplation. The science and wisdom of positive psychology is about using your strengths and the knowledge acquired through past experiences to push through the turbulence, and to even harness it to elevate you up to higher altitudes. Nobody lives only to be free of anxiety and illness. A life well lived consists of other elements than those which contribute to merely surviving, and these are the matters which positive psychology seeks to understand.” – Emilia Lahti
David Hain's insight:

What positive psychology does, and why it complements other aspects of the discipline.

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Stress Literally Shrinks Your Brain: 7 Ways To Reverse The Damage - Forbes

Stress Literally Shrinks Your Brain: 7 Ways To Reverse The Damage - Forbes | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s not impossible to reduce your stress levels; you just need to make managing stress a higher priority if you want to reverse this effect. The sooner you start managing your stress effectively, the easier it will be to keep unexpected stress from causing damage in the future.

“The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another.” –William James

Luckily, the plasticity of the brain allows it to mold, change, and rebuild damaged areas as you practice new behaviors. So implementing healthy stress-relieving techniques can train your brain to handle stress more effectively and decrease the likelihood of ill effects from stress in the future.
David Hain's insight:

The secret to a fulfilling life's in our heads. We were wired to succeed, said Darwin. Neurology is showing us how to do so thoughtfully!

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Turning the brain green

Turning the brain green | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Could a better understanding of the brain’s reward system — a network fine-tuned over millions of years and laser-focused on survival — help mankind skirt environmental disaster?

Ann-Christine Duhaime thinks it’s entirely possible. As part of her 2015-2016 Radcliffe fellowship, the Harvard Medical School professor and neurosurgeon studied whether the brain’s inherited drive for stuff and stimulation is making it hard for humans to get by with less, and harming the planet in the process. Her research suggests the answer is yes, and that curbing consumption will require tapping other types of rewards the brain craves.

“Our brain evolved with this wonderful system, but now it doesn’t know when to stop,” said Duhaime, Harvard’s Nicholas T. Zervas Professor of Neurosurgery, during a recent Radcliffe talk. “And so now your urges to eat get you into trouble, and your urges to get stuff are getting the planet into trouble.”

David Hain's insight:

How we can train our brains to think greener and resist oarlock of impulse control!

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Trust Requires Admitting Errors

Trust Requires Admitting Errors | Positive futures | Scoop.it
52 Ideas That You Can Implement to Build Trust

Nadine Hack offers this week's advice. Nadine is both a Top Thought Leader in Trust and a member of our Trust Alliance.

Be transparent about what's working and what's not. 

The impulse to “cover up” things that are not working so well is strong. But whether you're internal or external stakeholders, everyone appreciates and responds better to honesty. 

Leaders fear that if their initial decision is not panning out well, they will lose the confidence of their stakeholders. If you try to “sweep problems under the rug” or “fudge” on your reporting, this will be true.

If instead, you openly, candidly admit an error of judgment or acknowledge unanticipated events that make no longer valid what was a correct determination under different circumstances, your stakeholders will respect and trust you even more.

They will know they can count on the accuracy of your information when you share positive updates and they will be more likely to support your efforts regardless of outcomes at any specific moment.
David Hain's insight:

Great advice from @Nadine Hackabout how to open up not cover up, via @Barbara Kimmel's excellent Trust Alliance!

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Parkinson’s diagnosis: Sympathy versus Empathy? • Six Seconds

Parkinson’s diagnosis: Sympathy versus Empathy? • Six Seconds | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Sympathy versus Empathy?
I believe sympathy comes from how one would feel if they were in the other person’s shoes; while empathy comes from feeling what the other person is feeling.
Sympathy requires me to treat others as I would like to be treated; while empathy requires me to treat others as they would like to be treated.
According to Marco Iacoboni, all humans have “mirror neurons” and are wired to feel others emotions; if we are more self-aware and not overwhelmed by our own more intense emotions, such as fear, grief, and even excitement, we can be more empathetic.
David Hain's insight:

The distinction between sympathy and empathy is really important!

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This 5-Minute TED Talk by a Survivor of the 'Miracle on the Hudson' Just Might Change Your Life

This 5-Minute TED Talk by a Survivor of the 'Miracle on the Hudson' Just Might Change Your Life | Positive futures | Scoop.it
As the pilot next attempted the seemingly impossible, he uttered three words to the crew and passengers:

"Brace for impact."

Fortunately, as we now know, Captain Chesley B. "Sully" Sullenberger valiantly guided the plane onto the Hudson River. All 155 passengers and crew safely evacuated the airplane, and the event became known as the "Miracle on the Hudson." (All of this has been in the press again lately, as a new film portraying the events and their aftermath will be released later this year, with Tom Hanks playing the heroic captain.)

But imagine for a moment you were sitting on that plane, as it headed down toward the water. What do you think would go through your mind?

Ric Elias, co-founder and CEO of marketing firm Red Ventures, had a front-row seat on flight 1549. In the five-minute TED talk below, he opens up about three things he learned as the plane crashed, and how the event changed his life.
David Hain's insight:

How one man found his one important thing. Double lucky (and insightful) to survive near death, and to realise that it was a sign!

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Jimmy Carter: World at "turning point," must commit to peace

Jimmy Carter: World at "turning point," must commit to peace | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Former U.S. president Jimmy Carter said Monday that the world is at a "turning point in history" and governments must choose policies of peace and human rights over war and human suffering.

Carter's remarks opened a forum of human rights workers hosted by The Carter Center in Atlanta, attended by more than 60 global activists.

Carter, 91, said military actions, human rights violations and restrictions on freedom have inspired the spread of violent extremist groups. He said even the peace-focused mission of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Humans Rights adopted by the UN in 1948 "have been abandoned by the world."

"What is needed now, more than ever, is leadership that steers us away from fear and fosters greater confidence in the inherent goodness and ingenuity of humanity," Carter said.
David Hain's insight:

When this man speaks, we should all listen...

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Mindset matters - what’s it all about and why it matters

Mindset matters - what’s it all about and why it matters | Positive futures | Scoop.it

Do you find yourself stuck doing your job the way you always have? Are you well-suited to your role: it matches your talents and abilities, and you like to be in a role you can succeed at?

Or do you like a challenge, and prefer to take the risky role rather than the sure bet? These types of thoughts and strategies may be the result of your mindset. And you might want to review that mindset and your own beliefs in the light of research on talent and success.

David Hain's insight:

Mindset matters! And you can change it...

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Accepting These 6 Painful Truths Will Make You a Better Leader

Accepting These 6 Painful Truths Will Make You a Better Leader | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The real truth is that although leaders experience many joyful moments, there are these moments of disappointment as well.
David Hain's insight:

Some useful reality checks about how leadership really is...

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 29, 5:09 AM
Accepting These 6 Painful Truths Will Make You a Better Leader
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Why We’re Post-Fact | Peter Pomerantsev | Granta Magazine

Why We’re Post-Fact | Peter Pomerantsev | Granta Magazine | Positive futures | Scoop.it
As his army blatantly annexed Crimea, Vladimir Putin went on TV and, with a smirk, told the world there were no Russian soldiers in Ukraine. He wasn’t lying so much as saying the truth doesn’t matter. And when Donald Trump makes up facts on a whim, claims that he saw thousands of Muslims in New Jersey cheering the Twin Towers coming down, or that the Mexican government purposefully sends ‘bad’ immigrants to the US, when fact-checking agencies rate 78% of his statements untrue but he still becomes a US Presidential candidate – then it appears that facts no longer matter much in the land of the free. When the Brexit campaign announces ‘Let’s give our NHS the £350 million the EU takes every week’ and, on winning the referendum, the claim is shrugged off as a ‘mistake’ by one Brexit leader while another explains it as ‘an aspiration’, then it’s clear we are living in a ‘post-fact’ or ‘post-truth’ world. Not merely a world where politicians and media lie – they have always lied – but one where they don’t care whether they tell the truth or not.

How did we get here? Is it due to technology? Economic globalisation? The culmination of the history of philosophy? There is some sort of teenage joy in throwing off the weight of facts – those heavy symbols of education and authority, reminders of our place and limitations – but why is this rebellion happening right now?
David Hain's insight:

How we appear to be happier with a good lie that plays into popular emotions than the truth! A worrying trend well journaled here!

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10 Websites To Learn Something New In 30 Minutes A Day

10 Websites To Learn Something New In 30 Minutes A Day | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Learning something new is always an exciting endeavour to commence. The problem is that most of us get wrapped up in busy distractions throughout the day so that we can never find the time to learn the new skill we want.

What’s worse is that some of us spend hours learning this new skill only to give up after a few months, which is precious time that goes down the toilet.

Luckily, there’s a better solution.

Instead of using our time to sit through long lectures and lengthy video courses, we can take advantage of all the amazing websites that can help us learn a new skill in 30 minutes or less.

We’ve collected the best sites that teach a diversified list of topics and have decided to share them with you here today. Enjoy!
David Hain's insight:

Excellent connection to learning resources!

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A Simple 6 Step Self Compassion Exercise to Combat Depression and Low Self Esteem

A Simple 6 Step Self Compassion Exercise to Combat Depression and Low Self Esteem | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It’s all too easy to be extremely tough on ourselves; we need – at points – to get better at self-compassion. Here is an exercise in how to lessen the voices of self-flagellation.
David Hain's insight:

You're human too - worth remembering and acting upon to be at your best with everybody!

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The 5 Major Mind Traps that Hinder Happiness - Mindful

The 5 Major Mind Traps that Hinder Happiness - Mindful | Positive futures | Scoop.it
These roadblocks keep us stuck in the depression loop: caught up in negative thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as the brain anxiously rehashes past events and simultaneously rehearses a hopeless, catastrophic future. Here are some ways to avoid falling into these traps.
David Hain's insight:

Our minds have many voices. Beware, some are malicious!

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5 Best Mindfulness Books For Amazing Benefits

5 Best Mindfulness Books For Amazing Benefits | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Remember this mantra when you go in for anything new: What it does is more important than what it is.

You should always be more interested in what a thing does than what it is. You should be even more interested in knowing if what you’re asked to believe in, is their belief as well. You wouldn’t pay a small fortune to buy a slimming course from a fat guy, right?

This post isn’t about books that explain what mindfulness is. Instead, these books here are about what mindfulness can help you with — one book focusing on one benefit. These books are about the benefits of mindfulness that I believe in. I can even daresay that these are the best books on the practical uses of mindfulness by any yardstick. What you can get from these is a deep insight into mindfulness without tangling up your brain wires.
David Hain's insight:

What mindfulness can do, in 5 books via the Happiness Project of India!

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How to raise $170 million for a crazy idea 

How to raise $170 million for a crazy idea  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
At the origin of Solar Impulse in 2002, there was no money, no team and no technology. Nothing more than a crazy idea of achieving the first-ever solar flight around the world, with the objective of promoting clean solutions for a more sustainable world through a spectacular adventure. In the end, funds from marketing budgets and committed individuals have financed 13 years of research and development.
David Hain's insight:

A story of idealism and vision fulfilled! And it's not over yet ....there is still a place for odysseys in this crazy world!

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Your Brain Has A "Delete" Button--Here's How To Use It

Your Brain Has A "Delete" Button--Here's How To Use It | Positive futures | Scoop.it
There’s an old saying in neuroscience: neurons that fire together wire together. This means the more you run a neuro-circuit in your brain, the stronger that circuit becomes. This is why, to quote another old saw, practice makes perfect. The more you practice piano, or speaking a language, or juggling, the stronger those circuits get.

The ability to learn is about more than building and strengthening neural connections.
For years this has been the focus for learning new things. But as it turns out, the ability to learn is about more than building and strengthening neural connections. Even more important is our ability to break down the old ones. It's called "synaptic pruning." Here’s how it works.
David Hain's insight:

What we think, we become. A suggestion form neuroscience to make that work for you!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, July 15, 8:12 PM
Very wise advice "Be mindful of what your mindful of"
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 19, 4:55 AM
Your Brain Has A "Delete" Button--Here's How To Use It