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Inspiring the Next Generation of Thinkers - Edudemic

Inspiring the Next Generation of Thinkers - Edudemic | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Teaching kids goes beyond textbooks and classroom lessons. It has to include teaching them to open their minds and how to think for themselves.

This is how we will encourage them to reach their full potential.

One of the most important things we can teach kids is to believe in themselves. As adults we have an obligation to younger generations to help them gain confidence. We should also help them explore their ability to be creative.

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150+ Educational Websites For Lifelong Learners 

150+ Educational Websites For Lifelong Learners  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
If you are anything like me, you have discovered that the higher the level of traditional education you reach the more you are forced to specialize. And by the time people start doing research they have dedicated all their learning to a tiny niche.
For most of us, this is not useful. We need to (and let’s face it, want to) collect knowledge from a broad spectrum of subjects. Educational variety helps us make interesting connections and learn more deeply. Everlearning lets you add more and more value to your life both personally and professional in terms of career options.
This list is a curated collection of both free and premium learning resources, more free than premium, and all the free resources have been marked with an *.
David Hain's insight:

Lifelong learners -some shortcuts!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, February 21, 12:36 PM
150+ Educational Websites For Lifelong Learners
 
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How can we create a healthier world? – World Economic Forum

How can we create a healthier world? – World Economic Forum | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We all have an obligation to help people control their risk factors. It’s more straightforward than you may think. A 2015 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine concluded that chronic conditions such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and cancer could be cut by at least in half if people adopted healthy lifestyles such as regular exercise, diets low in sodium and added sugars, and abstained from using tobacco. Adopting healthy lifestyles however, doesn’t happen overnight. There is science behind why people change, as each person is inspired and motivated by varying emotional and life factors.
While taking an individual approach to extending and saving lives is effective, think about what a dramatic impact we can make by casting a bigger net and creating a culture of health. This means designing infrastructures so “the healthy choice is the easy choice”. For instance, nations can prioritize creating or maintaining safe spaces for exercise, low-cost options to purchase healthy foods, and clean-air laws that protect people from the dangers of secondhand smoke. It doesn’t even have to be an entire nation. It could happen in a company or in a neighbourhood. Every little bit helps.
David Hain's insight:

Imagine a world where health and well being is placed ahead of money and power...

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15 Female Entrepreneurs Disrupting The Status Quo 

15 Female Entrepreneurs Disrupting The Status Quo  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
At AngelHack, we know a lot about women in tech issues. As a female-founded and female-majority company in the (largely male) tech space, we’re an outlier, just like females at most hackathons. In fact we created an entire hackathon series around these issues.
Despite the obstacles in everything from capital access to safety, there are many women building their visions around the world. Instead of us describing what the entrepreneurship journey is like for women globally, we wanted to listen to pioneering females from diverse markets directly tell their stories. Meet some of the ladies shaping the future of business.
David Hain's insight:

Female role models are  gradually changing things, some examples and inspiration here!

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Leonard Mlodinow: The Three Laws of Probability

Leonard Mlodinow: The Three Laws of Probability | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In his book, The Drunkard's Walk, Leonard Mlodinow outlines the three key “laws” of probability.

The first law of probability is the most basic of all. But before we get to that, let's look at this question.

Linda is 31 years old, single, outspoken, and very bright. She majored in philosophy. As a student, she was deeply concerned with issues of discrimination and social justice, and also participated in anti-nuclear demonstrations.
Which is more probable?

Linda is a bank teller.
Linda is a bank teller and is active in the feminist movement.

To Kahneman and Tversky's surprise, 87 percent of the subjects in the study believed that the probability of Linda being a bank teller and active in the feminist movement was a higher probability than the probability that Linda is a bank teller.
David Hain's insight:

Some deceptively simple truths that can seriously aid decision making!

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Don’t Be Fooled by the Illusion of What Your Life Should Look Like

Every single day we are exposed to a perpetual illusion of what we think life should look like that is portrayed through Instagram feeds, status updates, and all of the other media we consume
Perfect portraits, selfies with scenic backdrops, and laptops with beaches in the background
Magazine covers where people are dressed to the 9’s
Gadgets, gear, gizmos and luxury goods
Daily advertisements that litter our social feeds with something we think we want but don’t have
All of these are layers upon layers of social programming in the matrix. Not only that we all contribute, participate and add to the programming. And this illusion creates a perpetual state of dissatisfaction that keeps us buying shit we don’t need to impress people we don’t like. Our default is to feed a voracious and insatiable appetite for more. Buy, eat, download, and acquire more
The illusion is an imagined reality and social construct. But with enough consumption, it becomes quite easy for us to confuse this illusion with objective reality. When we an envy a life that someone has thoroughly curated, edited and uploaded we have bought into the illusion of what we think our lives should look like and overlook that what we’re experiencing is a filtered reality.
The illusion of what your life should look like is the ultimate marketing tool and a form of propaganda. Refuse to question it at your own peril.
David Hain's insight:

Sound advice for life - challenge the illusions!

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The Psychology of Fascism – umair haque

We suppose that fascism is a product of a poisoned heart, of hate. That is not really true. Fascism is a product of mind. Immature and stunted mind, that can’t find a way to grow. The fascist mind, I will suggest, is caught in a trap — between fear of a father figure and fear of freedom.
Our first thought is “I”. As we grow, we learn this is a table, this is a chair, and so on. This first requires the thought: I am not that. We learn to separate the world into subject and object.
But not all objects are created equal: some are desirable, prizes, and some are undesirable, threats. As we mature, we become able to to learn the relationship of the “I” to the elements of the world. We think this is appropriate, that is not appropriate, this is desirable, that is undesirable, and so on. For most of us, maturity ends here. We are safe — but now lack meaning in our lives because we never take the next, and most significant step: learning to outgrow the “I” altogether. When we learn to become selfless — not in a small way, but in a real one. Not with little acts of charity, but to feel our emotions and express our feelings, so we can have genuine relationships, give and contribute to the world whole-heartedly, and so on. Genuine maturity is learning that “I” is a limiting way of being in the world.
David Hain's insight:

Fascinating and persuasive view of Fascism from Umair Hague. Many parallels in today's political and social struggles...

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You Don’t Control The Outcomes Of Your Life, Principles Do.

You don’t control the outcomes of your life.
You don’t control how other people will respond to you.
You don’t control your health.
You don’t control how much money you make.
Principles control these things.
Said Dr. Stephen R. Covey, “We control our actions, but the consequences that flow from those actions are controlled by principles.”
David Hain's insight:

Wise life advice - focus on what you can control, everything else is someone else's problem!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, February 8, 5:24 PM
Good article about how change happens "Small things become big things, always."
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The Forest and the Desert – umair haque

Every single life that has ever been, will ever be, contains the very same seed of virtue. Yours, mine, theirs. We are no different. We are all exactly the same in this regard — all of us. The question is: do we choose to become a forest, or do we stay a desert?
Growing a forest takes the three qualities I have discussed with you. Wisdom, strength, love. But how does one grow a desert? One doesn’t grow a desert. A desert is what happens without wisdom, strength, and love.
David Hain's insight:

Tough times need the kind of advice that Umair Haque often provides. 

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IBM Just Posted 5 Predictions About What Life Will Be Like in 2022

IBM Just Posted 5 Predictions About What Life Will Be Like in 2022 | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Technology giant IBM is known for of making bold predictions about the future, and it's just announced its latest "5 in 5" list, highlighting the five innovations that they think will have the biggest impact on our lives over the next five years.

According to the company, in only a few years, we're set to see huge developments in artificial intelligence (AI), ultra-powerful telescopes, smart sensors, and medical devices - with benefits ranging from healthcare and the environment, to our understanding of Earth and the Universe itself.


Of course, all these predictions are based on technology and research developments that are happening right now - there's no way of knowing what else might crop up in the next five years.

But take a look at this vision of the near future, and you might want to check back in once 2022 hits, just to see if the scientists got it right.
David Hain's insight:

AI to give us superhero powers within 5 years! Hype, or evidence based prediction? probably somewhere between the two...

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Charles Bukowski: The Slavery of the 9 to 5 – Personal Growth – Medium

Charles Bukowski: The Slavery of the 9 to 5 – Personal Growth – Medium | Positive futures | Scoop.it

In 1969, an offer came to hell.
Quit your job, and I’ll give you $100 a month for the rest of your life.
The offer came from John Martin, publisher and founder of Black Sparrow Press. Charles Bukowski — still an unknown writer — had spent his last decade at a “soul-wrenching” post office job.
He wanted out.
In a letter at the time, Bukowski wrote:
“I have one of two choices — stay in the post office and go crazy … or stay out here and play at writer and starve. I have decided to starve.

 

15 Years later, Bukowski wrote this letter of thanks.  It contains a good deal of wisdom.

David Hain's insight:

How one man got unexpected help to find his purpose!

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Are Your Happiness Goals Too High?

Are Your Happiness Goals Too High? | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In our competitive culture, we usually think “more is better.” Being Number One, winning at all costs, and “having the most” is deeply ingrained in our psyche as real success. This model of going for the max is often erroneously applied to our own well-being. People mistakenly think intense delight is a sign that their attempt at awakening joy is truly successful.
However, when we look for bells and whistles as indications of true happiness we’re misunderstanding a very important principle: Setting a high bar of intense happiness works against true well-being. Although I’m all for enjoying peak experiences when they arise, measuring that ideal against a moderate level of okayness can easily render this moment as “not good enough.”

We find what we look for. Science calls this phenomenon the brain’s “confirmation bias.” Your brain tends to see what it believes to be true and misses whatever doesn’t confirm its hypothesis. If you don’t think you experience much true happiness because you’re holding an image that it should be a peak experience of ecstasy, you probably will keep confirming that belief.
What’s the alternative? Aim for noticing how you really feel right at that moment—and embrace all your diverse feelings.
David Hain's insight:

Worry more about how you are now than whether your pursuit of happiness is succeeding!

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23 Things Everyone Can Do To Create A Life-changing Morning Routine

23 Things Everyone Can Do To Create A Life-changing Morning Routine | Positive futures | Scoop.it
There are five important things you would want to achieve in the morning:
1. Become Alert 
2. Take care of your emotional state 
3. Take care of your intellectual state 
4. Take care of your health
5. Work on an activity that supports your long-term goals
There are numerous things you can do in order to achieve these five things.
I’ve managed to compile universal activities, based on the research and personal experimentation.
So let’s start.
David Hain's insight:

Mornings are important, because the day follows. Some ideas to improve your morning routine...

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13 Things You Should Avoid Telling Yourself Every Day

13 Things You Should Avoid Telling Yourself Every Day | Positive futures | Scoop.it
It takes almost no time to find articles and stories that will tell you about the good habits or motivational mantras of people who have achieved success in their chosen field.
But, as interesting and inspirational as those articles can be, they only tell half of the story.
Many people will read them and instead of being inspired, come away with a dejected and defeated feeling.
“I’ll never be like those successful people,” they say to themselves. “They’re way more committed than I am.”
That’s negative self-talk. We’re all guilty of it from time to time.
There are at least four different types of negative self-talk: filtering, personalizing, catastrophizing and polarizing.
Here’s a sample of some of the things we may say to ourselves — things that serve only to steer us off the road to success.
David Hain's insight:

Fixed mindset --> self destructive habits. Good infographic with head-phrases to watch out for!

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How Feeling Frustrated Can Transform You and Your Business

How Feeling Frustrated Can Transform You and Your Business | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Sir Richard Branson, the billionaire founder of Virgin Group, is known for his countless insightful musings on the world of business and entrepreneurship, but there’s one saying in particular that’s been on my mind a lot lately.

“Finding something frustrating and seeing an opportunity to make it better is what entrepreneurship is all about.”

What a simple, yet profound, statement. It’s so true. Think of all the great innovations in history, and the inception of that product or service likely came from someone’s long-held frustration. Frustrated that taxis are expensive and hard to fetch? Here’s Uber. Think hotels are overpriced? Well, here’s Airbnb. Want to eat at a place that doesn’t offer delivery? OK, here’s GrubHub. Are you sick of using slow and ugly looking computers? Welcome to Apple.

The examples are endless.

Frustration is indeed the core of what spawns most great businesses. But, on a deeper level, there’s something even more powerful about being frustrated. Not only can frustration help people come up with ideas or create new ventures, but it can act as a motivator to keep individuals from stagnating when it comes to their own development.
David Hain's insight:

Welcome your frustrations - they may be giving you important signals!

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 17, 9:43 AM
Leaders shouldn’t be afraid of frustration. It’s not to say that frustration is an enjoyable experience worth looking forward to, to be sure. But understand that feeling frustrated is a normal part of development. I’d even argue that if you’re not feeling frustration from time to time, you’re doing something wrong. You’re not pushing yourself enough. You’re not thinking big. You’re not growing.
 
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The 7 Habits that Books and Reading Help You Build – The Mission – Medium

The 7 Habits that Books and Reading Help You Build – The Mission – Medium | Positive futures | Scoop.it
The most useful definition of technology I’ve heard is simply, “the ability to do more with less.”
I think of books and reading as technologies.
We only live one life, but through books, we can gain the wisdom from thousands. When an author writes, re-writes, and edits, they are turning their words into a more perfect version of themselves. When you read, you get to spend time in a meditative state with a wise person’s more perfect self.
Books are the most under-valued and under-appreciated technology in the world.
How do we know they’re so valuable? We need only to examine how the best and the worst people throughout history have viewed books.
David Hain's insight:

"Books are the training weights of the mind." That Seneca guy was on the money millennia ago!

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 14, 9:21 AM
“Books are the training weights of the mind” –Seneca
 
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Seven Steps to Help Your Kids Fail

Seven Steps to Help Your Kids Fail | Positive futures | Scoop.it
We have lots of problems to solve on this planet and need all the scientists and engineers we can muster. Even if our kids decide not to follow these paths, the basic recipe for success in science and engineering is the same as it is for all endeavors: Curiosity + Failure + Determination = Success.

How can you help your kids embrace failure?
David Hain's insight:

We want our kids to be successful - but over the long term, a counter-intuitive approach works better...help them fail!

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The World in 2025: 8 Predictions for the Next 10 Years

The World in 2025: 8 Predictions for the Next 10 Years | Positive futures | Scoop.it
In 2025, in accordance with Moore's Law, we'll see an acceleration in the rate of change as we move closer to a world of true abundance. Here are eight areas where we'll see extraordinary transformation in the next decade:
David Hain's insight:

Meet JARVIS and other transformative speculations. Exciting and scary simultaneously...

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A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop

A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop | Positive futures | Scoop.it

When students take notes using laptops they tend to take notes verbatim, writing down every last word uttered by their professor.
Obviously it is advantageous to draft more complete notes that precisely capture the course content and allow for a verbatim review of the material at a later date.  Only it isn’t. 

 

New research by Pam Mueller and Daniel Oppenheimer demonstrates that students who write out their notes on paper actually learn more.  Across three experiments, Mueller and Oppenheimer had students take notes in a classroom setting and then tested students on their memory for factual detail, their conceptual understanding of the material, and their ability to synthesize and generalize the information.  Half of the students were instructed to take notes with a laptop, and the other half were instructed to write the notes out by hand.  As in other studies, students who used laptops took more notes. 

 

In each study, however, those who wrote out their notes by hand had a stronger conceptual understanding and were more successful in applying and integrating the material than those who used took notes with their laptops.

David Hain's insight:

Students - and anyone who undertakes diagnostic interviewing -  should read this insightful piece on how to take notes more effectively.

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22 Mindfulness Exercises, Techniques & Activities For Adults (+ PDF's)

22 Mindfulness Exercises, Techniques & Activities For Adults (+ PDF's) | Positive futures | Scoop.it
People who meditate are happier, healthier, and more successful than those who don’t. Those amazing benefits of practicing meditation and mindfulness make you want to try it yourself.

Good chance you have already tried meditation or mindfulness before. Maybe you decided – after a few frustrating attempts – that you must be one of those people with an errant mind that just won’t follow instructions. This is a limiting belief. Like any skill, mindfulness takes practice. Try it again!

Now don’t roll your eyes. Sometimes the only thing standing between our goals and us is a little bit of direction. Hopefully, this article can provide the direction you need to give mindfulness a try in your own life or in your therapy or coaching sessions. Let’s dive in!
David Hain's insight:

Lots of mindfulness resources here - don't knock it until you've tried it!

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What is Learning? Emotional Intelligence for an Adventure of Growth

What is learning? It’s a process of growth… starting at a neurological level, new connections forming… At work, in life, and hopefully in every classroom, people are working to teach and learn. It’s a mental process — but current neuroscience confirms learning is also physical, social, and emotional. Are you someone committed to learning and helping others learn? If so, perhaps you’ve considered:
How does learning work best?
In the Six Seconds community, we’re starting this year focused on this big question and understanding the role of emotions and emotional intelligence as our brains build new insight and meaning. The adventure starts now with five essential highlights (plus inspiring learning quotes) below.
David Hain's insight:

Learning is fairly Darwinian - those of us who do it best tend to thrive. Worth looking at this useful resource, then...?

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, January 27, 10:27 AM

Learning is a full body contact sport without concern for concussions!

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We don’t need to teach our kids to code, we need to teach them how to dream

We don’t need to teach our kids to code, we need to teach them how to dream | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Businesses have complained about the poor skills of school-leavers, and we’ve assumed the way forward is to ensure that more people study for longer. I think that the changing world means that we need to prepare kids in a totally different way. A 5-year-old today will enter a working world in 2030 that is so incomprehensible that we need an existential re-imagination of the very foundation of education. It’s the cliched hope of the paranoid parent that teaching Chinese will best prepare kids for a future of different power structures in geopolitics, but is that essential in a world of Google translate? Many thinking teaching kids to code is the solution, but won’t soon software be written by software? Our vision for the future needs to include more imagination. It’s staggering to me as to how much the world has changed, and how little education has. The digital age means a different world.
David Hain's insight:

We are using an ancient paradigm to teach kids for life in a new and ultra dynamic one. How short sighted is that?

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The Downsides of Being Very Emotionally Intelligent

Iis higher EQ always beneficial? Although the downside of higher EQ remains largely unexplored, there are many reasons for being cautious about a one-size-fits-all or higher-is-always-better take on EQ. Most things are better in moderation, and there is a downside to every human trait.

David Hain's insight:

Like any other skill, EQ has a potential dark side...

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How to have better political conversations

How to have better political conversations | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Robb Willer studies the forces that unite and divide us. As a social psychologist, he researches how moral values — typically a source of division — can also be used to bring people together. Willer shares compelling insights on how we might bridge the ideological divide and offers some intuitive advice on ways to be more persuasive when talking politics.
David Hain's insight:

In today's fractured and polarised society, this is valuable advice!

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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, January 23, 1:17 PM
While we tend to want to avoid political discussions, they often cannot be completely avoided. Given this reality, this is a great perspective to consider.
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Is sugar the world’s most popular drug? 

Is sugar the world’s most popular drug?  | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Imagine a drug that can intoxicate us, can infuse us with energy and can be taken by mouth. It doesn’t have to be injected, smoked, or snorted for us to experience its sublime and soothing effects. Imagine that it mixes well with virtually every food and particularly liquids, and that when given to infants it provokes a feeling of pleasure so profound and intense that its pursuit becomes a driving force throughout their lives.

Could the taste of sugar on the tongue be a kind of intoxication? What about the possibility that sugar itself is an intoxicant, a drug? Overconsumption of this drug may have long-term side-effects, but there are none in the short term – no staggering or dizziness, no slurring of speech, no passing out or drifting away, no heart palpitations or respiratory distress. When it is given to children, its effects may be only more extreme variations on the apparently natural emotional rollercoaster of childhood, from the initial intoxication to the tantrums and whining of what may or may not be withdrawal a few hours later. More than anything, it makes children happy, at least for the period during which they’re consuming it. It calms their distress, eases their pain, focuses their attention and leaves them excited and full of joy until the dose wears off. The only downside is that children will come to expect another dose, perhaps to demand it, on a regular basis.
David Hain's insight:

Watch the sugar - it's insidiously addictive!

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Carl Jung On Why We Must Learn To Accept Ourselves Before We Can Help Others

Carl Jung On Why We Must Learn To Accept Ourselves Before We Can Help Others | Positive futures | Scoop.it
Carl Jung exhibited the sort of serene wisdom that is usually reserved for the reclusive-hermit-sage. Yet, he arrived at his personal “wholeness” not through the traditional route of Christian grace or Buddhist meditation, but through scientific and psychological means. Delving into his own troubled mind and reflecting on the neuroses of his patients, he arrived at an unsettling insight.

We must learn to accept our own darkness if we want to overcome our own neurosis.

Without this self-acceptance, our attempts to help others will be futile, both on an individual and global level.

Alan Watts said that Jung intimately embraced his own dark side and:

[H]e would not condemn the things in others and would therefore not be lead into those thoughts, feelings, and acts of violence towards others which are always characteristic of the people who project the devil in themselves upon the outside – upon somebody else – upon the scapegoat.
David Hain's insight:

Help can only come when a problem is acknowledged - it starts with self-acceptance - light and dark sides...!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, January 21, 7:30 PM
I always remember the insight from Jungian Robert Johnson that "the gold is in the shadow" Let's hope this is true for Brexit, Trump etc etc In the meantime we need to be accountable for 
embracing our own darkside and finding the good therein
Arron Saini's comment, February 8, 6:43 AM
When you help others, the experience speaks for itself. Soon it will become a part of your personality. https://goo.gl/YFYnRX