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Animated map showing the dramatic spread of agriculture over the last 300 years

Animated map showing the dramatic spread of agriculture over the last 300 years | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

The map, produced by Radicalcartography.net shows the amount of land given over to agriculture around the world over the three centuries leading up to the year 2000.

 

The map shows that in 1700, outside of Europe and Asia there was a very small proportion of land being farmed. The 18th century saw an increase in arable land for use and the beginnings of a vast improvement in agricultural yields. New farming methods, such as four-field crop rotation, the increased use of fertilizer and increasing mechanization, opened up additional swaths of land for agriculture.

 

Technology developed in the First and Second Industrial Revolutions saw farming rapidly expand into previously untapped areas, such as the American Great Plains in the late 19th century and Argentina in the early 20th century.

 

Expansion and intensification of existing farming continued into recent decades, with Brazil and central India becoming more intensely farmed since the late 20th century.

 

Historian and cartographer Bill Rankin argues that existing arable land has become "more and more agricultural". It is estimated that the productivity of wheat in England went up from about 19 bushels per acre in 1720 to around 30 bushels by 1840.

 

In recent years intensification has increased and land expansion has slowed in the developed world. This is largely down to the increased use of fertilizer, which has improved production yields.


Via Neelima Sinha, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 6, 4:18 AM

NSW Syllabus
Sustainable Biomes

Content focus
Students

- examine the correlation between the world’s climatic zones and spatial distributions of biomes and their capacity to support food and non-food agricultural production

-  analyse the impact humans have on biomes in an effort to produce food and increase agricultural yields

 

GeoWorld 9 NSW
Chapter 2 Biomes produce food and non food products

Chapter 3 factors affecting agricultural yields

Chapter 4 Challenges to food production and management 

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Gartner for Marketing Leaders: Gartner's 2015-2016 CMO Spend Survey

Gartner for Marketing Leaders: Gartner's 2015-2016 CMO Spend Survey | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

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marketingIO's curator insight, May 10, 12:52 PM

And the report is available for the price of your email address. Can we stop calling it digital marketing and just call it marketing?

 

marketingIO: One Source for All Marketing Technology Challenges. See our solutions.  

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Anyone who wants to be president needs to understand these 5 maps

Anyone who wants to be president needs to understand these 5 maps | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
Parag Khanna argues that these five maps are critical to understand the world we live in.

 

Maps shape how we see the world.  But most of the maps hanging on our walls are dangerously incomplete because they emphasize political borders rather than functional connections.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 12:11 AM

These 5 maps in this article are a sneak peek preview from the new book Connectography by Parag Khanna.  These maps all highlight interactions across political borders which is Khanna's big thesis.  For example, the map above emphasizes political, economic, and environmental linkages of NAFTA and minimizes the national divisions.    

 

Tags: regionsNorth Americamap, map archive.

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2015 Saw a Decrease in Global Religious Freedom

2015 Saw a Decrease in Global Religious Freedom | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

The global refugee crisis, political strife and economic dislocation all contributed to a worldwide deterioration of religious freedom in 2015 and an increase in societal intolerance, according to the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 9:33 AM

This is one of the sad results of the many global conflicts today and increase in reactionary political movements that scapegoat religious minorities.  The image above is a map/wordle of the 18th article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which states: "Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance."  

 

Tags: religion, ChristianityIslamBuddhismHinduismJudaism, podcastconflict, refugees.

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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 1:17 PM

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, April 24, 4:39 AM
Food - naturally.
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Why are there SO MANY mattress stores — and how do they stay in business?

Why are there SO MANY mattress stores — and how do they stay in business? | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
The showrooms appear to always be empty -- how do they stay open?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 18, 3:42 PM

It is a sorry state of affairs when voters are tired of hearing about the U.S. presidential candidates and would prefer to discuss the seemingly inexplicable proliferation of mattress stores.  Seriously though, this is a good example of a spatial question that explains things about the world. 

 

Tagsspatial, industry, economic.

 

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Marketing in 2016 - Key Findings!

Marketing in 2016 - Key Findings! | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
"The CMO's currency is the customer - customer voice, customer value, valence, and often, the experience itself." -

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, April 5, 4:39 AM

Vala Afshar shares insight from Salesforce State Of Marketing 2016 report. 

 

Key categories with 55 statistics:

 

- Priority and success measures

- Marketing alignment with business leadership

- Customer journey strategy

- Integrating the customer experience

- Tech adoption

- Marketing channels - real time channel orchestration

- ROI - Mobile - Email - Social

- Advertising accelerates on social platforms

 

Any surprises?

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Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?

Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others? | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
Reports of bombings tend to get huge numbers of mentions on social media, but that doesn't always mean a similar level of news coverage.

Via Seth Dixon, Luis Cardoso de Meneses
Luis Cardoso de Meneses's insight:

The short answer is obviously "Yes."  Yet, this question brings up other questions about cultural empathy and how 'connected' we might feel to people of other places than our own global neighborhood.  This political cartoon-ish map

has more truth in it than we might like to admit; it is subtitled 'How terrible it is the the Western world when a tragedy happens in...?'

 

Questions to Ponder: Does the 'where' influence if we perceive the event as a true tragedy or not (or maybe just the magnitude or importance of the tradegy)?  How come?  What does this say about us as inidividuals, society, and the media?  How can we teach our students in a way to foster more cultural empathy?

 

Tags:  social media, place, culture, political, terrorism, media. 

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jorden harris's curator insight, April 4, 9:52 AM

to me it is mind boggling how we can pay more attention to countries with national threats than others especially with ISIS being so prominent which is a war that is going to take help from not only the united states but the other affected countries

                                                                                                        - J.H

Logan scully's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM
It somewhat bothers me how that terrorist attacks outside of Europe and North America is pretty much just ignored by the social media while people are sitting in the hospital for crimes in which terrorists and other religious radicalists have done to their area and country.-L.S.
Brealyn Holley's curator insight, April 7, 10:20 AM
For the question "Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?" In my opinion the answer would be yes because a lot of the terror attacks in the Western world are bigger and are expected more than terror attacks near  us. ~BH
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No more washing: Nano-enhanced textiles clean themselves with light

No more washing: Nano-enhanced textiles clean themselves with light | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, have developed a cheap and efficient new way to grow special nanostructures—which can degrade organic matter when exposed to light—directly onto textiles.

 

The work paves the way towards nano-enhanced textiles that can spontaneously clean themselves of stains and grime simply by being put under a light bulb or worn out in the sun.

 

Dr Rajesh Ramanathan said the process developed by the team had a variety of applications for catalysis-based industries such as agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals and natural products, and could be easily scaled up to industrial levels.

 

"The advantage of textiles is they already have a 3D structure so they are great at absorbing light, which in turn speeds up the process of degrading organic matter," he said.

 

"There's more work to do to before we can start throwing out our washing machines, but this advance lays a strong foundation for the future development of fully self-cleaning textiles."

 

The researchers from the Ian Potter NanoBioSensing Facility and NanoBiotechnology Research Lab at RMIT worked with copper and silver-based nanostructures, which are known for their ability to absorb visible light.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Poor healthcare apps could cost hospitals $100 million a year, Accenture says

Poor healthcare apps could cost hospitals $100 million a year, Accenture says | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

While 66 of the 100 largest hospitals in the United States offer consumers mobile health apps, only 2 percent of patients are using them, according to a new report published on Wednesday by Accenture that also found that failure to focus apps on services consumers want most could cost each hospital more than $100 million a year in lost revenue.

 

In its “Losing Patience: Why Healthcare Providers Need to Up Their Mobile Game” report, the consultancy found that 38 of those top U.S. hospitals have developed health apps in-house rather than by hiring a mobile app vendor. 

 

By not aligning their functions and user experience with what patients expect, many of these mobile health apps are failing to win over more patients. For example, only 11 percent of the hospital apps offer at least one of the three most desired functions: access to medical records; the ability to book, change and cancel appointments; and the ability to request prescription refills, Accenture found. Significantly, about 7 percent of patients have switched healthcare providers because of a poor experience with online customer service, including mobile apps, Accenture said.

 

Accenture suggested that as consumers bring their service expectations from other industries into healthcare, providers will likely see higher switching rates on par with the mobile phone industry (9 percent), cable TV providers (11 percent) or even retail (30 percent).

 

“In many cases, we’re seeing hospitals only offering a subset of things in their mobile apps — view labs, look up some basic forms,” Brian Kalis, managing director of the health practice at Accenture, told Healthcare IT News. “A lot of what is offered is around core medical record pieces versus easy appointment scheduling and such. It’s just static information, not personalized or tailored to an individual.”

 

When developing new mobile health apps, or when revamping existing mobile apps, hospitals must adopt a patient-centric approach, Kalis said.

 

“Moving to a person-centered approach will help hospitals understand what the mobile experience should be in terms of how patients interact in mobile and what they want,” Kalis said. “From there, hospitals might work more closely with electronic medical records vendors, advocating for a better experience and more flexibility in tailoring that experience. And hospitals might choose a custom solution, more for the patient-facing piece, and work on building out a digital engagement platform on their own to provide more control over and flexibility of the experience.”

Further, hospitals should engage with prominent digital and mobile health companies that offer unique solutions — such as ZocDoc and InstaMed Go — to understand areas of great interest to consumers and how they fit into the healthcare ecosystem, Kalis said.

 

When it comes to the question of buy versus build, Kalis suggested with mobile health it’s not a matter of either/or. Instead, it should be both.

 

“Hospitals can work with emerging digital health disruptors in the mobile space and Internet of Things space; this can be done parallel with building solutions in-house,” he said. “It’s about the pace and scale of change: As you work on putting together a better experience for people on your own, or in collaboration with an electronic medical records vendor, there will always be a new set of solutions out there that is evolving. Collaborating with companies behind such solutions will further inform solutions built up within the enterprise.”

 

As the pace and scale of mobile health technology continues to grow faster and larger, hospitals must keep up.

“Mobile engagement is becoming increasingly critical to the success of every hospital in the digital age,” Kalis said. “Consumers want ubiquitous access to products and services as part of their customer experience, and those who become disillusioned with a provider’s mobile services, or a lack thereof, could look elsewhere for services.” 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Searching for aliens who already know we are here

Searching for aliens who already know we are here | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
Are we alone in the universe? To answer this question, astronomers have been using a variety of methods in the past decades to search for habitable planets and for the signals from extraterrestrial observers.

The first part of this venture has been highly successful: More than 2,000 planets around distant stars — so called exoplanets — have been found so far. The second part, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), has not yet been successful.

Maybe the search strategy has not been optimized until now, said researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Göttingen, Germany, and from McMaster University in Canada. They suggest that future searches focus on that part of the sky in which distant observers can notice the yearly transit of Earth in front of the Sun.

Observers in this zone could have discovered Earth with the same techniques that are used by terrestrial astronomers to discover and characterize exoplanets. According to the researchers, the probability that extraterrestrials are already deliberately sending us signals is much higher in this part of the sky.

This strategy reduces the region that needs to be searched to about two thousandths of the sky, drastically reducing the amount of data to be analyzed.

When a planet passes in front of its host star, it causes a small transient dimming of the star. This so called transit can be measurable, depending on the size on the planet and the sensitivity of the instrument. In fact, the majority of the exoplanets known to us today have been discovered with this transit method. A similar technique, called transit spectroscopy, might enable astronomers in the future to scan the atmospheres of exoplanets for gaseous indicators of life.

In a first step, the two researchers identified the region in the sky from which one sees the transits less than half a solar radius from the center of the solar disk. The possible exoplanetary systems that offer this perspective are all located in a small strip in the sky, the projection of Earth’s orbit around the Sun (the ecliptic) onto the celestial sphere. The area of this strip amounts only to about two thousandths of the entire sky.

“The key point of this strategy is that it confines the search area to a very small part of the sky. As a consequence, it might take us less than a human life span to find out whether or not there are extraterrestrial astronomers who have found the Earth. They may have detected Earth’s biogenic atmosphere and started to contact whoever is home,” said René Heller from MPS.

Not every star is equally well suited as a home of extraterrestrial life. The more massive a star, the shorter is its life span. Yet, a long stellar life is considered a prerequisite for the development of higher life forms. Therefore the researchers compiled a list of stars that are not only in the advantageous part of the sky, but also offer good chances of hosting evolved forms of life, that is, intelligent life. The researchers compiled a list of 82 nearby Sun-like stars that satisfy their criteria. This catalog can now serve as an immediate target list for SETI initiatives.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 19, 4:21 PM

Learning the lessons from exoplanet search to transform the SETI program could lead to a much more focused search. And therefore more successful. Looking at the limited area of the sky where aliens are the most likely to be listening to us already... as they might track us the way we track exoplanets. 

Stéphanie Guillaume's curator insight, March 21, 9:50 AM

A la recherche d'extra terrestres qui savent déjà que nous sommes là...

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Four Critical Components of Your Customer Journey Map - Profs

Four Critical Components of Your Customer Journey Map - Profs | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

marketingIO: One Source for All Marketing Technology Challenges. See our solutions. 


Via marketingIO
Luis Cardoso de Meneses's insight:

Need more info on the Buyer's Journey. Search our tag called...Buyer's Journey

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marketingIO's curator insight, March 10, 5:44 PM

Need more info on the Buyer's Journey. Search our tag called...Buyer's Journey

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Newly discovered bacteria can eat plastic bottles

Newly discovered bacteria can eat plastic bottles | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
A team of Japanese scientists has found a species of bacteria that eats the type of plastic found in most disposable water bottles.

 

The discovery, published Thursday in the journal Science, could lead to new methods to manage the more than 50 million tons of this particular type of plastic produced globally each year.

The plastic found in water bottles is known as polyethylene terephthalate, or PET. It is also found in polyester clothing, frozen-dinner trays and blister packaging.

 

"If you walk down the aisle in Wal-Mart you're seeing a lot of PET," said Tracy Mincer, who studies plastics in the ocean at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. Part of the appeal of PET is that it is lightweight, colorless and strong. However, it has also been notoriously resistant to being broken down by microbes-what experts call "biodegradation." Previous studies had found a few species of fungi can grow on PET, but until now, no one had found any microbes that can eat it.

 

To find the plastic-eating bacterium described in the study, the Japanese research team from Kyoto Institute of Technology and Keio University collected 250 PET-contaminated samples including sediment, soil and wastewater from a plastic bottle recycling site.

 

Next they screened the microbes living on the samples to see whether any of them were eating the PET and using it to grow. They originally found a consortium of bugs that appeared to break down a PET film, but they eventually discovered that just one of bacteria species was responsible for the PET degradation. They named it Ideonella sakainesis.

 

Further tests in the lab revealed that it used two enzymes to break down the PET. After adhering to the PET surface, the bacteria secretes one enzyme onto the PET to generate an intermediate chemical. That chemical is then taken up by the cell, where another enzyme breaks it down even further, providing the bacteria with carbon and energy to grow.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Infographic: Here's How Gen Z Girls Prefer to Shop and Socialize Online

Infographic: Here's How Gen Z Girls Prefer to Shop and Socialize Online | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
Millennials are still the demographic du jour, but that's going to change soon. Enter: Gen Z. The youngest members of the cohort are in middle school, while the oldest are finishing up college.

Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
Luis Cardoso de Meneses's insight:
...quem tem adolescentes em casa certamente identificará alguns padrões... :-)
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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, May 10, 9:20 AM
What do you know about Gen Z consumer behavior? Here is some recent research about the shopping behaviors of Gen Z girls and young women.
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Climate-exodus expected in the Middle East and North Africa

Climate-exodus expected in the Middle East and North Africa | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

The number of climate refugees could increase dramatically in future. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry and the Cyprus Institute in Nicosia have calculated that the Middle East and North Africa could become so hot that human habitability is compromised. The goal of limiting global warming to less than two degrees Celsius, agreed at the recent UN climate summit in Paris, will not be sufficient to prevent this scenario. The temperature during summer in the already very hot Middle East and North Africa will increase more than two times faster compared to the average global warming. This means that during hot days temperatures south of the Mediterranean will reach around 46 degrees Celsius (approximately 114 degrees Fahrenheit) by mid-century. Such extremely hot days will occur five times more often than was the case at the turn of the millennium. In combination with increasing air pollution by windblown desert dust, the environmental conditions could become intolerable and may force people to migrate.


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99.999 percent of microbe species remain undiscovered, researchers claim

99.999 percent of microbe species remain undiscovered, researchers claim | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
Microbes make up the vast majority of species on Earth, but when it comes to identifying them, humans seems clueless.

 

Earth could harbor 1 trillion microbial species, but humans only know about 0.001 percent of them, two biologists from Indiana University suggest in a paper published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  

 

"We've done a pretty good job of cataloguing macrobes. Maybe every few years you'll hear about a new worm at the bottom of the ocean, but the rate we are exploring new plants and animals is slowing down," Jay Lennon, a microbial biology researcher at Indiana University Bloomington (IU) and co-author of the new study. "But it's only in the last 20 to 30 years that people have figured out how to identify microbes; we are still in an area of discovery. Before this study, it was hard to know where we were. These are the most abundant life on Earth, so from a scientific perspective, we've missed a huge group," he says. 


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Performance minus Expectations = Satisfaction

Performance minus Expectations = Satisfaction | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
The first step in exceeding your customer's expectations is to know those expectations. -Roy H. Williams

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, April 13, 5:52 PM

"Expectations are funny things:

 

  • Customers have them, but they are not in control of them, not in control of the outcomes.
  • Customers have them, but companies must know them and understand them.
  • Companies set them (brand promise, service delivery, documentation, etc.), yet they have trouble delivering against them (consistently)."

 

Check the great interview that follows with Annette Franz & Stan Phelps

 

Next steps for your #CX - 3D from Stan Phelps:

1. Discovery

2. Designing

3. Deployment

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10 Tips para crear URLs que le gustan a Google

10 Tips para crear URLs que le gustan a Google | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
Crear URLs que le gustan a Google es una de las técnicas más importantes a tener en cuenta para el SEO On Page de nuestros sitios.

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Checking Messages Is Part of Almost Everyone's Morning Routine - eMarketer

Checking Messages Is Part of Almost Everyone's Morning Routine - eMarketer | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
Most check before breakfast

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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 4, 9:36 AM
The penetration of digital influences into the lifestyles of people shows clear demographic differences.
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This map should change the way you think about foreign aid

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
As you can see, the biggest recipient by a long way is Israel (this is fiscal year 2014 data, but nothing's changing), and two other big ones are Egypt and Jordan, which both have aid packages that are tied up with their peace treaties with Israel. None of these are poor countries (indeed, Israel is downright rich), and the point of the money is to advance an American foreign policy agenda — not to help the poor. Pakistan and Afghanistan, which round out the top five, actually are pretty poor, but, again, the main American interest in them is clearly foreign policy rather than poverty.

 

Tags: political, geopolitics, development, economic.


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lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 1:01 PM
I wonder what this would look like if it were a map of the US's federal aid to the 50 states.
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No more washing: Nano-enhanced textiles clean themselves with light

No more washing: Nano-enhanced textiles clean themselves with light | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, have developed a cheap and efficient new way to grow special nanostructures—which can degrade organic matter when exposed to light—directly onto textiles.

 

The work paves the way towards nano-enhanced textiles that can spontaneously clean themselves of stains and grime simply by being put under a light bulb or worn out in the sun.

 

Dr Rajesh Ramanathan said the process developed by the team had a variety of applications for catalysis-based industries such as agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals and natural products, and could be easily scaled up to industrial levels.

 

"The advantage of textiles is they already have a 3D structure so they are great at absorbing light, which in turn speeds up the process of degrading organic matter," he said.

 

"There's more work to do to before we can start throwing out our washing machines, but this advance lays a strong foundation for the future development of fully self-cleaning textiles."

 

The researchers from the Ian Potter NanoBioSensing Facility and NanoBiotechnology Research Lab at RMIT worked with copper and silver-based nanostructures, which are known for their ability to absorb visible light.


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Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?

Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others? | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
Reports of bombings tend to get huge numbers of mentions on social media, but that doesn't always mean a similar level of news coverage.

Via Seth Dixon
Luis Cardoso de Meneses's insight:

The short answer is obviously "Yes."  Yet, this question brings up other questions about cultural empathy and how 'connected' we might feel to people of other places than our own global neighborhood.  This political cartoon-ish map

has more truth in it than we might like to admit; it is subtitled 'How terrible it is the the Western world when a tragedy happens in...?'

 

Questions to Ponder: Does the 'where' influence if we perceive the event as a true tragedy or not (or maybe just the magnitude or importance of the tradegy)?  How come?  What does this say about us as inidividuals, society, and the media?  How can we teach our students in a way to foster more cultural empathy?

 

Tags:  social media, place, culture, political, terrorism, media. 

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jorden harris's curator insight, April 4, 9:52 AM

to me it is mind boggling how we can pay more attention to countries with national threats than others especially with ISIS being so prominent which is a war that is going to take help from not only the united states but the other affected countries

                                                                                                        - J.H

Logan scully's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM
It somewhat bothers me how that terrorist attacks outside of Europe and North America is pretty much just ignored by the social media while people are sitting in the hospital for crimes in which terrorists and other religious radicalists have done to their area and country.-L.S.
Brealyn Holley's curator insight, April 7, 10:20 AM
For the question "Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?" In my opinion the answer would be yes because a lot of the terror attacks in the Western world are bigger and are expected more than terror attacks near  us. ~BH
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Sponsored: Keeping core operations in focus under healthcare reform

Sponsored: Keeping core operations in focus under healthcare reform | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

Much of the focus of healthcare reform has not been on the core operations of organizations; however, the ability to reduce costs and drive e­fficiency while continually improving clinical quality and patient satisfaction is foundational to healthcare reform – and successful healthcare organizations. Nimesh Shah, president of McKesson’s Enterprise Information Solutions (EIS), has extensive experience in solutions for e­fficiently and effectively managing core operations. In his role as McKesson’s EIS president, he has leadership responsibility for Paragon® EHR, revenue cycle management, supply chain management, document management, ancillary solutions, professional and managed services.

 

With so much focus on analytics, interoperability and value-based care, is our industry in jeopardy of taking our eye off­ of the importance of core operations?

From a provider perspective, analytics, interoperability and value-based care are critically important, especially in relation to population management, care plans for patients and reduced readmissions. That said, providers also need to pay attention to their daily operations – labor, supplies, workflow, IT infrastructure and the health of their revenue cycle, to name a few. Simply put, you can’t get to clinical and financial health if you ignore operational health. Everything is contingent upon a strong foundation.

 

And to have a strong foundation, it’s critical to elevate the role of IT. Rather than a cost center, you should consider health IT as a strategic lever and then spend time with your vendor to understand what’s required in order to drive value from your IT investments. Are your processes optimized? Have users adopted the systems? Are they using all the functionality available to them? Are you getting the data needed to put analytics to work and drive business decisions? Bottom line, with the appropriate focus, your health IT infrastructure has the potential to be a powerful enabler for organizational success.

 

What absolutely needs to be in the sights of every healthcare executive in terms of operational health?

Healthcare executives have a lot on their plate, ranging from physician alignment and patient engagement to ongoing regulatory change and resulting new requirements. But let’s keep sight of why we’re in this business: high-quality, safe care and ultimately, better health for patients. To accomplish that mission, executives must focus on the critical jobs to be done in building any sustainable, healthy business. These include reducing costs where possible, identifying savings in supply costs while supporting the ability to better manage and predict supply spend, optimizing the revenue cycle, managing your workforce and reducing variability to improve quality.

Here’s a real-life example of the impact operational health can have. A provider was experiencing 80 percent of their admissions through the ED, resulting in extended wait times, patient dissatisfaction and medication-labeling errors. By modifying their operational workflow to better leverage their EHR solution, they’ve improved patient throughput, patient care and patient satisfaction. Scores supporting patient satisfaction have jumped from the 65th percentile to the 91st percentile. Not to mention medication-labeling errors went down to less than one per month. Improving core operations resulted in drastic improvements in patient care.

 

What can organizations do to streamline and simplify the complex processes specific to managing today’s mix of reimbursement models?

Focusing on interoperability and making sure your vendors are committed to open systems and uninterrupted movement of patient data across all care settings will ultimately result in faster reimbursement through easier and faster access to patient information.

We’re also going to begin seeing more providers outsource revenue cycle management. Rather than spending the time, resources or the money figuring out the complexity of reimbursement, providers can work with well-skilled partners who can put the right metrics and processes in place. It’s a win-win scenario for the patient and the provider.

 

After an organization puts new tools and processes in place to support the value-based model, what strategies encourage the cultural change and engagement needed for adoption?

Communication is a key factor in changing old practices as you take on risk and evolve toward payment models that are value-based. Have you prepared physicians and other staff before making changes that affect their workflow? Are you clearly communicating expectations and actively seeking buy-in? Have processes been updated to effectively integrate new technology and achieve the outcomes you expect?

Relying on experienced resources can also be a key driver to successful adoption, as best practices can save both time and money. We’ve found that our customers want to know how to best affect change, drive adoption and transform their organizations to achieve desired outcomes – across settings of care and functional areas. Professional services can help mentor an organization through that process to achieve faster results, such as improved adoption of technology, less resistance to standardization and better compliance with organizational protocols.

 

But organizations can’t a­fford to operate at a loss, so they are watching every penny. Can they afford to outsource in today’s climate?

For any organization, for-profit or not-for-profit, the question is always: Can this be done cheaper if we partner with somebody, or can we do it cheaper ourselves? That’s a fair and essential question, but other considerations are also important. It may look cheaper to do it yourself, but it may take you longer. Or, you may not get the full range of benefits available to you. In my mind, it’s a question of competency and efficiency. Can we find and retain the right talent? If providers don’t have strong IT competency in place, they may not have the right efficiency measures in place. It also raises the question of where to spend time and limited resources. Is it fundamental to your mission? If it’s not, then you’re better off partnering. Services like IT Outsourcing or Remote Hosting enable an organization to focus on strategic initiatives and deliver quality patient care, while vendors specializing in providing IT services take on the tactical elements of the IT infrastructure and productivity demands of the modern workplace. Bottom line: it makes sense to partner with an expert when the value of the partnership exceeds the total cost of doing it yourself and leads to better business and patient outcomes.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Luis Cardoso de Meneses's insight:

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Technical Dr. Inc.'s curator insight, March 18, 3:00 AM

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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- The Technical Doctor Team

Rescooped by Luis Cardoso de Meneses from Geography Education
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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:31 PM
The times, they are a-changin'
Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 9:04 AM
Our world is changing, that is inevitable.  It's how we decide to use the technology and knowledge we now have to better ourselves or destroy ourselves.
Rescooped by Luis Cardoso de Meneses from The MarTech Digest
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12 Things Not To Do When Using Digital Marketing In 2016 - Forbes

12 Things Not To Do When Using Digital Marketing In 2016 - Forbes | Portugueses Curious | Scoop.it
1. Failing to identify your target audience.

2. Not having a strategy at all.

3. Forgetting about mobile.

4. Rejecting SEO.

5. Not doing any conversion optimization.

6. Trying every digital marketing tactic in the book.

7. Using every social media platform available.

8. Paying for followers.

9. Link building.

10. Neglecting content marketing.

11. Having no marketing budget.

12. Expecting huge results in no time.

 

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