Porter Geography
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Rescooped by Chris Porter from APHuG Culture
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Understanding the Darfur Conflict

This is a short, but effective video to quickly explain the geographic factors that have led to such turmoil within the Darfur region.  For more in-depth resources, see:

http://www.scoop.it/t/darfur-devastation

 


Via Clovis C. Perry, Jr., Cassandra Medeiros, Seth Dixon, Samantha Fraser
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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:59 PM

Like many conflicts covered in the United States little insight is given into the origin of the event and instead on the present and most importantly how it affects us. This video gives a good understanding of how this conflict came about as well as a look into how the area stands today. For such a tragic and horrific event it is really unfortunate that so many in the west know almost nothing about this conflict.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 12:10 PM

In a country like Sudan who's wealth lies in its oil production its evident that these different groups would have conflict with one another. I believe that the government has decided to side with the Arab merchants because if the ties Arab merchants may have with the Arab world, turning a blind eye towards the turmoil Africans are faced with. Though the land has since been separated since the start of the conflict between these two groups, there is still a problem that this newly formed independent. With an unstable government and still having to face the problems of its past, South Sudan and Sudan have a long way to go before the tension between the two is resolved.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:44 PM

why does it seem that every conflict in the world is started and sustained by Arabs, i dont know if that sounds bad or not but all over the world arabs seem to be running around killing people. also how does the government of sudan/darfur allow this to happen. greedy people running these countries is the problem.

Rescooped by Chris Porter from Geography Education
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The New World

The New World | Porter Geography | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


Via Seth Dixon
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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 2015 8:53 AM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:12 AM

Devolution/Fragmentation

 

This article is about nations that could become potentially independent in the near Future, whether due to chronic ethnic incoherence, redrawn governemnt policies, or a growing stateless nation group. Some examples given are an independent Khurdistan, a larger Azerbaijan, and the split of Belgium. 

 

Centrifugal forces are the root of conflict in many countries. These forces include ethnic variety, lack of common language, political instability. These are what may be causing a split in both Belgium (developed country) and Somalia (developing country). There may also be a unification of countries—the map gives an example of the Saudia Arabia, Oman, Yemen, Bahrain, and other melding into one Arabian Gulf Union, of China absorbing Siberia. This does not necessarily herald the presence of centripetal forces, as these countries may be the result of military conquest.