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▶ Rare Access To Calais' 'The Jungle' At Heart Of Migrant Crisis - Journeyman Pictures

Published on Aug 3, 2015
Life in the Jungle: A look at the daily lives of people struggling in 'The Jungle' of Calais.


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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it

"A floating vessel that is longer than the Empire State Building is high has taken to the water for the first time.  Despite appearances, Prelude cannot strictly be described as a ship as it needs to be towed to its destination rather than travelling under its own power."


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:34 PM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 8:51 PM
unit 6
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:19 AM

This is a floating testament that economies of scale will continue to push the limits.  Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America.  This is one reason why Nicaragua is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 5, 2014 11:50 PM

We discussed how the container has transformed the global economy. These videos show how a simple tee shirt is made from cotton in the US, labor in Columbia, Indonesia, and Bangladesh. In the 1950s Malcolm McLean developed the first shipping container industry and transformed the global economy. Due to the fact that these containers can hold some many items, shipping goods from place to place makes manufacturing a global process. Economic geographies were completely revamped by the innovation of McLean, now a making a tee shirt connects the economies of many nations. A piece of clothing being sold in the United States now is connected to labor across the globe. 

Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 5, 2015 4:54 PM

Tracking the commodity of the T-shirt from cotton to retail.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM


NPR's Planet Money has produced an 8-part series following the commodity chain of the T-Shirt.  This series explores cotton production, textile mills, sweatshops, outsourcing and in this podcast, the transportation infrastructure that moves goods globally.  This podcast touches on the same topic as one of my favorite TED talks, how containerization enabled globalization.   

 

Tags:  transportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology, podcast.


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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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The Global State of Agriculture infographic

The Global State of Agriculture infographic | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
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Human Development Index

This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola).


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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, July 6, 2013 8:27 PM

CD - The different ways of measuring and mapping human wellbeing and development, and how these can be applied to measure differences between places.

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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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A World Wide Population Crash is Inevitable

A World Wide Population Crash is Inevitable | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
Our readers may be surprised to see a self described political conservative stating unequivocally that a world wide crash of the human population is not only inevitable but overdue. Isn't that within the purview of those Progressives and other...

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World Population: Where it's thick and where it's thin

World Population: Where it's thick and where it's thin | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
The growing population of the world, now estimated to be over 7 billion, marks a global milestone and presents obvious challenges for the planet.  There are extremely densely populated cities and sparsely populated countries. ...

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Could Earth's Population Peak in 2050?

Could Earth's Population Peak in 2050? | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it

For the past two decades, demographers have generally agreed that global population growth will continue to inch steadily higher in the coming century, raising concerns about everything from pollution to housing to the world's water supply.

But a new study out of Spain suggests those estimates may be way off—several billion people off—and that the earth's population could instead peak as soon as 2050. Applying a mathematical model to global population trends, these researchers believe that there will be fewer people living on earth in 2100 than there are today.

In 2011, the United Nations population division predicted a global population of 10.1 billion by 2100, an increase of nearly 50 percent from the earth's current population of 7 billion.

But scientists at the Autonomous University of Madrid and CEU-San Pablo University say their estimates, developed by using techniques from high-level physics to analyze UN population data between 1950 and the present, match that low-fertility curve. That path shows global population peaking in 2050 slightly above eight billion, and then falling back to 6.2 billion by the end of the century, the same as the total world population back in 2000...

 

Read the complete article for more details and related diagrams.


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How big was the world's population when you were born?

How big was the world's population when you were born? | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
The world's population is due to hit 7bn this October.

If today the world's population is (almost!) 7 billion, what was the population when you were born?  How much has the world's population changed in your lifetime?  This interactive link shows the acceleration of growth powerfully (disclaimer: the dataset only works on dates after 1951--hint: if it was before 1952, world population was smaller than 2.5 billion).


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 25, 2011 9:22 PM
During the year I was born the global population was about 5,053,230,502. Dijbouti, was the fastest growing country in the world and, Grenada was the slowest growing country. During my lifetime i feel as though the population had increased drastically. It makes me think if our population is going to continue to increase drastically or if it will slow down and stay at a steady population. There are only so many resources in the world and if we continue to grow they will eventually run out.
Seth Dixon's comment, October 28, 2011 2:21 PM
I'm 4.0 billion. The growth isn't a shocking as the acceleration rate.
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Global and National Population Pyramids

Global and National Population Pyramids | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
Interactive Visualization of the Population Pyramids of the World from 1950 to 2050...

 

Need population pyramids?  This is a site with good global and national population pyramids with good temporal data as well to show changes in the population (good for explaining the demographic transition model).   


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MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

If you struggle with population structure - this visualisation may be useful. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:09 PM

This website allows the user to look into the past, and into the future of population all over the world. The population pyramids show the distribution between young and elder people. It is very interesting to see how the pyramid is able to show the predicted population pyramid of the future as well. 

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 6:39 PM

Access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation - Population pyramids show population of different ages from each gender in a certain country. From population pyramids, you can conclude a country's development level. For example, if there is an equal population of all ages, this means that they have amazing health care, great education to educate women about birth control towards population, and good sanitation. From all of this information, you can tell how developed a country may be and perhaps also whether the country has many cities And urbanization. 

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▶ African migrants: What really drives them to Europe?

Published on Jun 6, 2015

Thousands of Africans put their lives at risk as they go on a boat journey in search of what they think would be a better and easier living. It is a journey that begins with hope, but often ends in despair. We travelled off the coast of Libya to meet African migrants risking everything for a future in Europe. Who are they? Where do they come from? And what do they expect to find on the other side of the Mediterranean Sea?


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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.

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CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, December 14, 2013 11:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."


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Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:39 AM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 13, 2014 6:30 PM

The most amazing conversation I had in Jamaica was with a musician who had traveled the world as I have. He worried about the crowding in Asia. We talked about the uneven distribution of space. I like peering down from a plane while traveling over the west ( in America) lots of white spaces on the map.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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Waiting for a house that never comes

Waiting for a house that never comes | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
Fifty-eight houses built by government in Nyanga, Cape Town, to be given to those who needed them. It should have been a happy ending – but it hasn’t turned out that way at all. A report last week told the story of how the state-subsidised houses in Nyanga have been vandalised beyond repair: broken into pieces in a dispute over which residents would have first access to them. It’s a sad tale which reflects a wider problem – people waiting for houses still believe in a “waiting line” that doesn’t really exist any more. By REBECCA DAVIS.

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

"nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke..."


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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:40 AM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:57 PM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion. 

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Percentage of Population Living in Poverty

Percentage of Population Living in Poverty | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it

This interactive map shows national estimates of the percentage of the population falling below the poverty line.  That is a quite problematic situation to map, since the operational definitions of poverty vary considerably among countries.  Also, there are some counties without data (Central Africa, North Korea, etc.)  However, there is still considerable value to be gleaned from this map.  What regional patterns do you notice?  How will this map inform our understanding of migration patterns and political unrest?


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Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 7:26 AM

This map show that most countries in Africa and south America are suffering from poverty. The country suffering from the highest amount of poverty is Chad. it has 80% of its people in poverty and countries around Chad also experience high amounts of poverty. Many articles state that the government there is corrupted. i too believe that the government is corrupted. i hope that the government helps the people and not themselves. People are dying every minute in areas like this due to famine. there are many children who are left to fend for themselves and are abandoned at the very young age as their families couldnt afford to fill another mouth. i believe all this can end if the government does something for the people. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:10 AM

I hope the economy get better in the next decades, specially in Latin America. We need more young people we money to spend there. That will open more opportunities for business all over the world.

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The Costs of Population Growth

The Costs of Population Growth | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it

The United States population is expected to pass 400 million by 2051.


That’s 85 million more people who will need good jobs, sufficient space, clean water and energy.


We will need to make adjustments in order to have a healthy economy in the coming years. So what would happen if the world population – including in the United States – just kept growing? It’s simply not sustainable. The costs to both people and our planet would far outweigh the benefits.

Read the complete article for the relevant facts on the potential impacts of population growth on environmental and social issues...


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MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:07 AM

It is constantly a strain on the environment but what about economically? 

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No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:11 PM

Unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:06 AM

11 billion people projection for the future but a decline in population in Europe? How? What factors altered this? Why? 

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:36 PM

This article discusses the population decrease in Southern Italy. The small city called Laviano is now deserted because of the extremely low birth rate. Rocco Falivena, the major, says that he proposed a system to get women to produce more babies. Pregnant women will receive 10,000 euros over the years if they produce a baby. Even with this system the population remains to be decreasing. 


The dramatic decrease of this small city will have huge economic consequences. This city is an example of the opposite that is happening globally and proves that the world needs a stable population and not a population decline. 

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World population nears 7 billion: Can we handle it?

World population nears 7 billion: Can we handle it? | Population OR Economic Matters | Scoop.it
She's a 40-year-old mother of eight, with a ninth child due soon. The family homestead in a Burundi village is too small to provide enough food, and three of the children have quit school for lack of money to pay required fees.

 

Here are some more perspectives on demographics, climbing population totals and the consequences and realities of these numbers. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, October 19, 2011 5:46 PM
I do not believe we can continue to increase drastically in population and handle it. Natural resources eventually end. Agriculturally we may be able to grow crops and food but eventually that too will come to a shortage. With an increase in population we increase in levels of pollution in the air, soil, and water. Inadequate water supply for drinking and sewage is another problem we could face. Just overall we would increase in higher levels of poverty because the shortage of jobs would continue to increase. This would lead to an abundance of things such an malnutrition, starvation, increase in homeless population and so much more.
Seth Dixon's comment, October 21, 2011 1:01 PM
Back the Nepal forest video, sustainability of resource consumption is the key. There are complications with population growth no doubt...but which are the CULTURAL issues surrounding population growth?
Samantha Johns's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:14 AM

I believe if the world keeps producing offspring like this that we will soon be overpopulated.  There is only a limited  amount of resources and with the high birth rate and lower death rate we will soon have nothing at all.  The soon to be 7 billion people on this earth will only produce more, and with more means less food and natural resources.