Population Growth - North America
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How farmland became Canada’s hottest real estate market

How farmland became Canada’s hottest real estate market | Population Growth - North America | Scoop.it

Buy land, advised Mark Twain, because, as the punch line goes, they ain’t making any more of it. Fast forward to 2013 and that advice, as a look at prices for farmland shows, seems as prescient as ever.

As any farmer will readily tell you, the agriculture business has had a tough run. Agriculture was once an economic mainstay. Turn back the clock to 1950 and the sector employed nearly a fifth of Canada’s work force. Today, agriculture accounts for less than 2 per cent of the country’s employed workers, while its share of gross domestic product is also a shadow of what it once was. Farm prices have languished for decades, as Canada’s population has shifted from rural to urban. By the 1990s, North America was losing two acres of productive farmland to development every minute.

 

How the world has changed for Canada’s farmers in 2013. The hottest sector of the country’s real estate market is, you guessed it, farmland. The price of farmland in Canada has outpaced both residential and commercial real estate, gaining an average of 12 per cent over the last five years. In some hotspots, such as southwestern Ontario, the price-per-acre has been going up by as much as 50 per cent a year. Even pension plans and hedge funds have become players in the pursuit of prime agricultural land, interest that is only sending prices that much higher.

If global food prices are any indication, such investments could be a solid bet. Over the last decade, global food prices have more than doubled, according to the United Nations FAO Food Price Index, which tracks monthly changes in prices for international food commodities. The food riots stemming from that price inflation were part of the spark that set off the Arab Spring. So far this year prices have been falling, but they still remain within shouting distance of the record highs reached in 2011.

The strength in global food prices is no accident. The growth in global food demand is unrelenting. Part of the reason is due to population growth. The world is at 7-billion people and counting. But that’s not the only thing straining food supply. World grain demand has also soared, as households in fast-growing Asian countries trade in rice bowls for cheeseburgers. It takes seven pounds of grain to raise a pound of beef. That’s a whole lot more than it takes to make a loaf of bread. The newfound economic clout in emerging economies such as China and India, which between them have roughly 2.5 billion people, has allowed more people to diversify their diets. In turn, global meat consumption has bounded ahead at double the rate of population growth over the last two decades.

All that demand for protein bodes well for the world’s breadbaskets. That is if Mother Nature doesn’t get in the way first. A severe drought a few years ago forced Russia, the world’s third largest producer of wheat, barley and rye, to suspend grain exports for nearly a year. Before that a drought in China caused a spike in grain prices that affected everything from the price of pasta in Italy to the cost of tortillas in Mexico. Closer to home the US Midwest has been grinding through one of the worst droughts in more than half a century.

Climate change scientists warn that droughts and other agricultural shocks will be even more common in the future. Against a backdrop of climbing temperatures, Canada sits in an interesting spot. With a wealth of arable land and 7 per cent of the world’s fresh water, Canada’s agricultural potential is considerable. It’s also possible the amount of land under cultivation in Canada could actually increase as global temperatures continue to rise and the wheat belt climbs farther north.

Could it be that in the coming years we’ll also see farmers actually start reclaiming acres from far-flung suburbs? The idea is much more plausible now than it was only a few years ago. It was depressed farm prices that allowed prime agricultural land to be paved over in the first place. As food becomes more precious and more expensive, it will only add to the market forces that will push some of those farms to come back.

 


Via Stéphane Bisaillon
Brad Bortscheller's insight:

This is a great article about farming in Canada. It is not related to pupulation directly, but it is sort of a cause and effect. The farmland and farming aspect of Canada's economy is attracting more people. It is becoming more of an economic influence. That makes it affect population by attracting more people from other countries or attracting people from within the country changing the distribution. Either way it is affecting the population and I think it is a good article to read.

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Aleasha Reed's curator insight, October 2, 2013 11:54 AM

This is talking about how Canada's land use and how the price for farmland has increased almost 50% because the agriculture buisness has been tough. It also talks about how our global population has grown a lot of the past 50-60 years, and it's becoming harder to supply food to everyone, therefor making the food prices rise. The growth of our population has a major impact on our resouces and food.

FutureInvestmentsInc's curator insight, October 16, 2014 12:32 AM

Really interesting and you might get ideas about what Canada real estate is...

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Factors affecting populations

Which factors affect populations? Find out here
Brad Bortscheller's insight:

In this article, it doesn't actually explain the population growth of North America or any country. It instead explains about the different factors affecting it. The difference for Immigration and Emigration affecting any country. It even highlights how agricultural change affects population, like how with a chain reaction it leads to higher birthrates. Even the emancipation of women affects it if you read the article, you can find out!

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Lucas Hileman's comment, September 27, 2013 12:17 PM
I never knew there were so many factors that play in Population Growth, I am actually surprised by the facts in this article. I really liked it!!!
Molly Howard's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:21 PM

This article talks about what is affecting America's population. It talks about how Imigration (people coming into the country) and Emigration (people leaving the country) affects the population. The emancipation of women also affects the population because it has caused a delay in the child bearing age because of how women are more likely to go to college and get a job before having a child. There are many ways that our poplation is affected and this article talks about many of them.

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U.S. immigration, population growth, and the environment - SUSPS

U.S. immigration, fertility, population growth, and the environment - SUSPS support traditional comprehensive Sierra Club population policy, including birth rates and overall immigration numbers, in achieving U.S.
Brad Bortscheller's insight:

This article is similar to another, as it puts the growth of population mostly on immigration. It says that unless we further act on our nation's immigration policy, the population is likely to double by the end of the century. Also, if the population keeps increasing like it is, by 2020 we will have enough added population to have another New York City! Mortality has been decreasing and birth rates are no longer significant for the population, but immigration continues to be the main reason for our increasing population.

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yongyee yang's comment, September 27, 2013 2:38 PM
I think that this article is pretty important because immigration is our highest influence of a rising population. Also, the fact stated that if our population kept on going up like this, then by 2020, there would be A LOT of people in the U.S.. Enough to make a lot of the current major cities double in population. Those major cities already have a lot of people so doubling it could mean a lot of trouble. I hope that the U.S. can find a good way to take care of this so that their own economy isn't brought down.
Carter Roose's comment, October 2, 2013 11:32 AM
I think it is crazy how fast the population is growing and having another NYC will be unbelievable.
Molly Howard's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:25 PM

This article mostly talks about how immigration affects our country's population very greatly. It talks about how immagration rates are so high that our population is likely to double by the end of the century. It says how immigration is the largest factor contributing to population growth in the U.S. and that our country should do something about that. I agree with the article in saying that we need to make some changes in our immigration policy. If we don't do anything about it then our country may become overly populated.

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List of North American countries by population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of North American countries by population

This is a list of North American countries and dependent territories by population, which is sorted by the mid-year normalized demographic projections. Rank Country (or dependent territory) June 1, 2013 projection[1] % of pop.

Brad Bortscheller's insight:

This page talks about population in North America by country. This is important to see where the vast majority of people go to live in the continent. Obviously people go to more to the U.S. because of job opportunities and better quality of life. I think it makes sense because most immigrants that come here do find better quality of life. Canada is 3rd in population because it is so far north it is cold and not as many people want to be there.

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What effect does population growth have on oil and water?

The places that consume the most water, Barlow says, are not the places with exploding populations. Maude Barlow: It is important when we think about populat...
Brad Bortscheller's insight:

This article speaks about the problems of pupulation growth. We here in North America use the most energy. We use the most water as well. It says it could go on to lead us to be like Austrailia. This is a problem and while population growth is a good thing, there are negative consequences. We need to be more careful!

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Molly Howard's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:13 PM

In this video they talk about the population growth in North America and the problems it is starting. The lady says how North America uses the most ammount of energy and water. The lady talks about how since USA's population is growing, we are using even more of the water and energy. I think people need to be more conservative and use less energy and water to try and help solve this problem.

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The World Factbook

The World Factbook | Population Growth - North America | Scoop.it
Brad Bortscheller's insight:

This page from the CIA website talks about the different aspects of population growth like birth and death rate, the percent growth rate, and other things. It has cool facts like urbanization and the median age of male, female, and both. Population distribution is talked about with New York City, Los Angeles, and Washington D.C. The total fertility rate stated on this page is 2.06 children per family. It even talks about things like drinking water source quality. Very insightful for not only the growth, but why.

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Molly Howard's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:03 PM

This page talks about all of the population of America. It talks about all of the different types of Ethnic Groups, the different languages, the religions, the different ages of all of the population, the growth rate, the birth rate, the death rate, the migration rate, the population number in total and many other things that would be important to know if you are living in the United States.

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What's Driving the Decline in U.S. Population Growth?

The United States added just 2.3 million people from 2010 to 2011, compared with 2.9 million from 2005 to 2006, just five years earlier.
Brad Bortscheller's insight:

This article highlights not only the population growth but how the population growth is declining. It says that instead of going up 0.9%, it went up only 0.7% each year from 2000-2010. So while it is still growing, the growth is declining. It then goes on to explain how this is probably from a lower immigration rate. That is caused by lower amounts of construction and manufacturing jobs. Also the stricter immigration laws have lowered the immigration rate.

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Aleasha Reed's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:00 PM

It highlights as to why the United States population rate is slowly declining. It is said to be because of lower immigration levels, less people being born, and just the population aging in general. It has gone from about 0.9% between 2000-2010, to 0.7% between 2010-2011. The decline in immigration rates is due to job losses in the common jobs where  immigrants tend to work.

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North America - Population growth rate in North America | Total fertility rate in North America | Infant mortality rate in North America

Vital statistics of North America. Population growth rate, birth rates (both for boys and girls), death rates, migration rate, total fertility rate, infant mortality rate (both for boys and girls).
Brad Bortscheller's insight:

This article is great in not only telling you about the population growth of North America, but showing you. It tells you things like birthrate and immigration rate. It also talks about infant mortality rate, then summarizes it all up to the total population growth rate. It seperates boys, girls, infants and regular people.

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Allie Moore's comment, October 1, 2013 9:42 PM
I think this article is interesting because it just shows you how our world is growing and birth and immigration rates are increasing. More and more people are wanting to come into our country and with the death rates more and more crimes are being committed.
Molly Howard's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:57 PM

This article shows you and tells you about the population growth in North America. It tells you about the birth rate and death rate in North America. It tells you what the Infant mortality rate is. It also talks about the migration rate. The chart separates boys and girls.