Population growth impact
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Population growth impact
Population growth impact
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Report: Humans near tipping point that could dramatically change Earth

Report: Humans near tipping point that could dramatically change Earth | Population growth impact | Scoop.it
Human activity is affecting Earth in many ways, but a new study suggests that continued population growth and its impact on climate and ecology could trigger a more profound chain reaction of effects within little more than a decade.

 

The variety and distribution of plants and animals on Earth – and, for many species, prospects for survival – may be nearing an abrupt, fundamental change because of human activity, warns an international team of ecologists and biologists.


Via Larry Glover, David Hain
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Report: Humans near tipping point that could dramatically change Earth

Report: Humans near tipping point that could dramatically change Earth | Population growth impact | Scoop.it
Two Yale architects pose the question in an ambitious research project."The City of 7 Billion".to study the impact of population growth and resource consumption.

Via Larry Glover, David Hain
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Rescooped by Nikol Vidov from Sustainable Futures
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Revisiting population growth: The impact of ecological limits

Revisiting population growth: The impact of ecological limits | Population growth impact | Scoop.it

Demographers are predicting that world population will climb to 10 billion later this century. But with the planet heating up and growing numbers of people putting increasing pressure on water and food supplies and on life-sustaining ecosystems, will this projected population boom turn into a bust?


Via Flora Moon
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Making Smarter Cities | The Atlantic

Making Smarter Cities | The Atlantic | Population growth impact | Scoop.it

As population growth drives urbanization, the environmental impacts of cities are becoming increasingly important. By 2050, some 90% of the U.S. population and 70% of the world population will live in cities, according to the University of Michigan's Center for Sustainable Systems.

As a result, interest in "smart cities" that provide technologically advanced services and infrastructure is increasing: The global smart city market is projected to cross $1 trillion in 2016, with players such as IBM and Accenture leading the way.

"Successful cities will need to differentiate themselves to attract investment and productive residents," said Ruthbea Yesner Clarke, Research Director of IDC's Smart Cities Strategies, in a recent report. Constrained financial resources, fast-growing populations, and aging infrastructures are driving investment in smart cities, she said.


Via Lauren Moss
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The Costs of Population Growth

The Costs of Population Growth | Population growth impact | Scoop.it

The United States population is expected to pass 400 million by 2051.


That’s 85 million more people who will need good jobs, sufficient space, clean water and energy.


We will need to make adjustments in order to have a healthy economy in the coming years. So what would happen if the world population – including in the United States – just kept growing? It’s simply not sustainable. The costs to both people and our planet would far outweigh the benefits.

Read the complete article for the relevant facts on the potential impacts of population growth on environmental and social issues...


Via Lauren Moss
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MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:07 AM

It is constantly a strain on the environment but what about economically? 

Rescooped by Nikol Vidov from Positive futures
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Report: Humans near tipping point that could dramatically change Earth

Report: Humans near tipping point that could dramatically change Earth | Population growth impact | Scoop.it
Human activity is affecting Earth in many ways, but a new study suggests that continued population growth and its impact on climate and ecology could trigger a more profound chain reaction of effects within little more than a decade.

 

The variety and distribution of plants and animals on Earth – and, for many species, prospects for survival – may be nearing an abrupt, fundamental change because of human activity, warns an international team of ecologists and biologists.


Via Larry Glover, David Hain
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Rescooped by Nikol Vidov from geoinformação
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The AfriPop Project

The AfriPop Project | Population growth impact | Scoop.it

High resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions.


Via geoinformacao
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Rescooped by Nikol Vidov from The Great Transition
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Revisiting Population Growth: The Impact of Ecological Limits

Revisiting Population Growth: The Impact of Ecological Limits | Population growth impact | Scoop.it

One of the smarter articles on the population challenge highlighting the potential impact of climate change and resource scarcity on world population in the long run. 


Via Willy De Backer
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amor mundi: Schlock and Awesome; Or, The Futurists Are Worse Than You Think

Very Serious Futurologist and Dean Martin impersonator (just a heartfelt suggestion, dude) Patrick Tucker, begins his discussion of the book Abundance: The Future is Better Than You Think by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler by complaining that too “many of us have fallen to the urge to surrender, to turn away from the growing needs of a bulging global population, to deny the reality of humanity’s impact on the Earth and the climate, to nurse our collective anxiety with the false comfort of ignorance and isolationism.” He cites as a cause of this a number of impacts of global human population growth which suggests, all things being equal, “energy demand will rise by 60% between 2002 and 2030. The number of people on the brink of starvation is above one-sixth of the total number of people on the planet, or at least one billion people, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). It will only get worse as current trends predict that two-thirds of the global population will live in a water-stressed environment by the year 2030, a phenomenon exacerbated by climate change.”


Via jean lievens
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