population geography
Follow
Find tag "worldwide"
1.7K views | +0 today
population geography
population growth patterns, causes and consequences
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | population geography | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  

 

Great site for students to look at the distribution of global population phenomena in map, list and graphic form


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 9:04 AM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earth's City Lights

Earth's City Lights | population geography | Scoop.it
NASA's Visible Earth catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet...

 

This classic image is full of classroom applications.  The first impulse of most students is to note that this image will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, September 18, 2012 9:35 AM
This image is pretty amazing to see. It shows what parts of the world are more modernized just by the lights seen from space. Looking at the U.S. and Europe, they are lit up very bright because they are richer parts of the world. As you look at places like Africa and some parts of South America, they are shown in darkness due to poorer areas in those regions.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:07 PM
I was impressed with the explanation of this picture especially for the simple fact that I thought it was a picture that depicted the population of certain areas of each country. Places like Africa, Brazil, areas of Mexico, and Southern US are not lit because of the areas of forest, desert and less population. Very nice picture. -Michelle Carvajal-
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | population geography | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Real World at Night

The Real World at Night | population geography | Scoop.it

Earlier I have posted the classic image of "Earth Lights at Night," and discussed the classroom uses of the image.  This cartogram helps take that analysis one step further.  This cartogram helps students to visualize the magnitude of population (with the cartogram adjusting area for population) and then to see the patterns of energy use, global consumption and urbanization with in a new light. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 8:29 AM
This map is obviously not the actual size of countries, but it is in a way. The populations of China and India are so great compared to the rest of the world and this map shows that.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | population geography | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s curator insight, August 3, 2013 1:59 PM

Various historical essays on population have captured the attention of many who may have otherwise tended to be indifferent to what had been obvious to the authors all along.

Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 2:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 7:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.