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population growth patterns, causes and consequences
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Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture | population geography | Scoop.it
There are currently 1 billion people in the world today who are hungry. There's also another billion people who over eat unhealthy foods.

 Food production around the world today is mostly done through industrial agriculture, and by judging current issues with obesity, worldwide food shortages, and the destruction of soil, it may not be the best process. We need to be able to feed our world without destroying it, and finding a more sustainable approach to accomplishing that is becoming more important.

The current system contributes to 1/3 of global emissions, is a polluter of our world’s water resources, and is a contributor to health problems. Industrial agriculture relies on mass produced, mechanized labor-saving policies that have pushed people out of rural areas and into cities, consolidating land and resources into fewer hands.

Agroecology looks to reduces agriculture’s impact on climate by working within natural systems. This is especially beneficial in rural areas, because the local community a major part of the growing process. The approach can conserve and protect soil and water — through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry — especially beneficial in areas where farmers lack modern irrigation infrastructure, or have farms situated on hillsides and other difficult farming sites...


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:53 PM

Clearly industrial agriculture is not sustainable, and must be replaced entirely with systems that reverse the current damage and restore the balance that used to exist before we messed things up.  We can use plants and animals not only to feed ourselves, but to *improve* the environment for all life on the planet.

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Civic Problems in Deindustrialized Urban America

Civic Problems in Deindustrialized Urban America | population geography | Scoop.it
The following is a post from David Schalliol, the Visiting Assistant Professor of Social Sciences at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

 

This is photoessay focuses on urban decay in a deindustrializing cities in the United States.  The goal is not to strictly bemoan the urban blight and see these ares as 'victims of decline,' but to also acknowledge the community that has emerged despite the economic hardships. 


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The Economics of Sustainability

http://www.ted.com Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Paul Gilding suggests we have, and the possibility of...

 

This provocatively title TED talk would be an excellent resource for discussing sustainable development.  What are the economic, environmental, political and cultural ramifications of suggested policies that seek to lead towards sustainable development?  What are the ramifications of not changing policies towards sustainable development?  


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:02 AM

 I found this video very interesting because it spoke about how there is so little space and more and more people are having kids. But there is no space because everyone likes having a lot of room to expand that is why because everyone in the world could fit in the state of California. So there is space it is just not spread out good enough that everyone could fit comfortably. 

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Pavan Sukhdev: Put a value on nature!

TED Talks Every day, we use materials from the earth without thinking, for free. But what if we had to pay for their true value: would it make us more careful about what we use and what we waste?

 

Companies derive economic value from the environment without paying the true environmental costs of their enterprises.  Sukhdev call this the 'Economic Invisibilty of Nature.'  Many countries are mortgaging their environment's future for economic growth today.  This also disproportionately impacts the developing world and rural people more adversely.  Key to his argument is that we need to identify negative externalities on the environment that produce private profits and acknowledge them as public losses.  


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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:13 PM

This a very interesting topic. Most of the time we take our earth for granted imagine if we need to pay for every time we use our earth I don’t think we would to afford it. Is very important for us to take care of it. It so sad that we have to force to protect it; for example here in providence we get punish with a fine if we don’t recycle. Taking care of our world should be a feeling from within people shouldn’t be made to do it.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:15 AM

Nature is very important because everyone in the world depends on it because that is where we can get the oxygen that we need to live and also we can hunt for food because many people in this world do not have access to a supermarket because it is to far or they just don’t believe in the existence of a supermarket. I wonder why some people would decide to live so far from civilization because I could not do that. I would get depressed very quickly because there would be nothing to do there.

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Energy Needs

Energy Needs | population geography | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


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