population geography
1.9K views | +0 today
Follow
population geography
population growth patterns, causes and consequences
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The State of Food Insecurity

The State of Food Insecurity | population geography | Scoop.it
Millions of Americans don't have reliable access to food. Here, we take a look at who's affected and why.

Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The ironic nature of the world’s food crisis

The ironic nature of the world’s food crisis | population geography | Scoop.it
EVEN AS we’ve officially reached 7 billion souls on our planet, more than 14% are still chronically malnourished.

And while analysts spend precious time calculating how much more food should be produced to feed the hungry, and thoughtful citizens update their Facebook statuses for an hour to “help eradicate World Hunger,” food prices are slowly increasing and soils are becoming poorer, yielding fewer crops every year.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Jessica Martel's curator insight, April 29, 2013 1:11 PM

There are many ways our country alone can help the food shortage in the world. Then you stop and think.. there are poeple still starving in the US.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Distance To McDonald’s

Distance To McDonald’s | population geography | Scoop.it

This map answers a few simple questions:  How far away is the nearest McDonald's?  Where is the concentration of McDonald's highest or lowest?  While population density is the immediate pattern that we identify, what else can this map show us?   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 11:27 AM
Diffusion and globalization are truly forces to be reckoned with.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The Two Sides of the World Food Crisis

The Two Sides of the World Food Crisis | population geography | Scoop.it

Of all the issues facig the planet, few seem more urgent than the global food shortage. Sufficient food- our single most vital need as living creatures- eludes the grasp of nearly 1 billion people, a problem that may worsen as population rises.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture | population geography | Scoop.it
There are currently 1 billion people in the world today who are hungry. There's also another billion people who over eat unhealthy foods.

 Food production around the world today is mostly done through industrial agriculture, and by judging current issues with obesity, worldwide food shortages, and the destruction of soil, it may not be the best process. We need to be able to feed our world without destroying it, and finding a more sustainable approach to accomplishing that is becoming more important.

The current system contributes to 1/3 of global emissions, is a polluter of our world’s water resources, and is a contributor to health problems. Industrial agriculture relies on mass produced, mechanized labor-saving policies that have pushed people out of rural areas and into cities, consolidating land and resources into fewer hands.

Agroecology looks to reduces agriculture’s impact on climate by working within natural systems. This is especially beneficial in rural areas, because the local community a major part of the growing process. The approach can conserve and protect soil and water — through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry — especially beneficial in areas where farmers lack modern irrigation infrastructure, or have farms situated on hillsides and other difficult farming sites...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:53 PM

Clearly industrial agriculture is not sustainable, and must be replaced entirely with systems that reverse the current damage and restore the balance that used to exist before we messed things up.  We can use plants and animals not only to feed ourselves, but to *improve* the environment for all life on the planet.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China now eats twice the meat we do

China now eats twice the meat we do | population geography | Scoop.it
We can learn a lot from examining the way China's diet has changed in the last 20 years -- as well as its required efficiencies and the agriculture that supports it.

 

The United States still consumes more meat per capita than China, but as China's economy has grown (along with it's income and standard of living), the consumer habits have changed as well.  What will the impacts of the rise in Chinese meat consumption mean?   How do they get all this meat?  http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1661841673/this-little-piggy-is-going-to-china


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:07 PM

This is actuallty very believable considering the population growth that China has experienced.  It only makes sense that the more people there are, the more meat will be consumed.  It is part of their cuisine to include meat.  Pork and chicken are among many of the popular proteins which are found on their dishes.  There is also the expansion to go along with all of the growth.  The landscape of the eastern part of the country has become more agriculturally accomodating for crops and livestock alike.  Therefore to match the trend of growing population, is the need to match it with meat and other foods.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:25 PM

China now eats twice as much meat than America. However, this chart does not touch upon "per-capita" which plays a major role in where the food is being dispersed and consumed. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:55 PM

China's meat demand is being met by importing meat. As the standard of living rises more of China's population are looking to branch out in regards to their diet, what is interesting is that this is also an example of cultures blending. Food is a great indicator of cultural diffusion. As China becomes more globalized we are seeing their diet and consumption patterns becoming less local and tradition.