population geography
Follow
Find tag "EastAsia"
1.7K views | +0 today
population geography
population growth patterns, causes and consequences
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China now eats twice the meat we do

China now eats twice the meat we do | population geography | Scoop.it
We can learn a lot from examining the way China's diet has changed in the last 20 years -- as well as its required efficiencies and the agriculture that supports it.

 

The United States still consumes more meat per capita than China, but as China's economy has grown (along with it's income and standard of living), the consumer habits have changed as well.  What will the impacts of the rise in Chinese meat consumption mean?   How do they get all this meat?  http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1661841673/this-little-piggy-is-going-to-china


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:15 PM

I wonder if this will bring on a meat shortage. At the least it is helping to full "factory" farmer and the feeding on cheep corn to cows. I wonder how much this will effect global warming.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:07 AM

This is actuallty very believable considering the population growth that China has experienced.  It only makes sense that the more people there are, the more meat will be consumed.  It is part of their cuisine to include meat.  Pork and chicken are among many of the popular proteins which are found on their dishes.  There is also the expansion to go along with all of the growth.  The landscape of the eastern part of the country has become more agriculturally accomodating for crops and livestock alike.  Therefore to match the trend of growing population, is the need to match it with meat and other foods.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:25 PM

China now eats twice as much meat than America. However, this chart does not touch upon "per-capita" which plays a major role in where the food is being dispersed and consumed. 

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | population geography | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 8:11 AM
I agree with Don, couldn't have said it better.
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 6:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:26 AM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | population geography | Scoop.it
There are “babyloids” and relatives-for-rent in an increasingly childless Japan.

 

While many parts of the world are concerned with population growth, Japan is struggling to find ways to slow down the demographic decline.  What economic and cultural forces are leading the the changing nature of Japanese demographics?  A video that explains the changing nature of modern Japanese relationships and gender norms can be accessed here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/30/japan-population-decline-youth-no-sex_n_1242014.html


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 9:52 PM
This article helps to see why population is declining so rapidly in Japan. There is not just one contributing factor, but many factors. There is a high suicide rate and low birth rate. Many single Japanese women decide not to have children, while countries such as the US, many single women choose to have children. Japan's high divorce rate will also cause decline in population. Al of these factors that contribute to the decline in Japan's population is hurting the economy. If the population does not start to increase, Japan will be further in trouble.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:21 PM

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | population geography | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s curator insight, August 3, 2013 1:59 PM

Various historical essays on population have captured the attention of many who may have otherwise tended to be indifferent to what had been obvious to the authors all along.

Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 2:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 7:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.