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population growth patterns, causes and consequences
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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 8:01 PM

We will be learning about Malthus in Chapter 2.  Take a sneek peek!

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:57 AM

The Malthusian ideas maintain that food growth is only linear, while population growth is geometric, so soon population will outgrow food production and famines will occur,

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 11:01 AM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.

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VIDEO: TED Talk by Hans Rosling on global population growth

TED Talks The world's population will grow to 9 billion over the next 50 years -- and only by raising the living standards of the poorest can we check population growth.

 

TED talks are great resources, and this one about global population growth, is a great link with Hans Roslings trademark data visualizations that simplifiy complex data and 'tell the story,' but this time using far more common visual aids.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 6:25 PM
The question that he seemed not to address in this presentation is how many people the earth can sustain? Is it not true that the wealthiest countries consume a disportionate amount of the world resources contributing to the anguish of the impoverished? The question perhaps should be centered on not preventing the population from exceeding 7-9 billion but equalizing and properly allocating the resources of the planet.
Ken Morrison's comment, September 29, 2012 7:01 PM
Hello. Sorry about the suggestion. I thought I was posting that to my site. Have a great day. I really like your site.
Ken Morrison's comment, September 29, 2012 7:01 PM
Hello. Sorry about the suggestion. I thought I was posting that to my site. Have a great day. I really like your site. Ken
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Global and National Population Pyramids

Global and National Population Pyramids | population geography | Scoop.it
Interactive Visualization of the Population Pyramids of the World from 1950 to 2050...

 

Need population pyramids?  This is a site with good global and national population pyramids with good temporal data as well to show changes in the population (good for explaining the demographic transition model).   


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2013 6:44 AM

Need population pyramids?  This is a site with good global and national population pyramids with good temporal data as well to show changes in the population (good for explaining the demographic transition model).  

UCGSGeo's curator insight, February 12, 12:40 PM

great for identifying where countries are in the DTM

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 3:57 PM

This article depicts how the pyramid and demographic transition model coincide.

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Lesson Plans - Population Reference Bureau

Lesson Plans - Population Reference Bureau | population geography | Scoop.it

Over 10 lesson plans for teaching demographics, migration, the demographic transition and more.  Included is a teaching packet, "making population real" specifically for the AP curriculum produced by the venerable Martha Sharma. 


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China's village of the bachelors: no wives in sight in remote settlement

China's village of the bachelors: no wives in sight in remote settlement | population geography | Scoop.it
Surplus of males caused by preference for sons means poor subsistence farmers have no chance of finding a mate...

 

One-child policy, gender preference, rural-urban divide in modernizing China...the list of applications goes on. 


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 4:33 PM

I don’t understand how China could kill Chinese girl’s baby’s and not see 20 years down the road how that would affect there country. Even if it’s the family doing it because the boys can work and help the family eat, the government should have created job opportunities for girls motivating the poorer families to raise there children equally.  Maybe they wanted to thin overpopulation in china so they skipped a generation, it seems horrible but empires have done terrible things in history to maintain power.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:23 PM


This was going to happen anyways because china having that one child rule was going to imbalance the population more males less females. Those rules being in place family members were forced to have boys because they would be the one to take over and inherent the land its parents left them. If they would have a girl they that land will go to the husbands family and plus boys would be the favorite child because they can work much faster than what a girl would. That being said the girls would be given up or killed. Now china has millions of males and little females. Which makes it difficult for the males to get married and have children of their own.

The ratio to males to females is six to one talk about crazy. But now that china has allowed a family to have two children instead of one. Now over the years we will see and increase in females and as well as males because of the imbalance of the country. But china allowing to have more than one kid will come at a price because

that is more people they have to maintain and china already being overpopulated will make it even worse for them.

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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | population geography | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 3, 2011 5:05 PM
This is absolutely shocking! I never thought this was possible. It is even more shocking that it is so common within many countries and not just Hong Kong. The only two countries that seem to be in good standings are Canada and Brazil. All other 14 are at risk during the years 3000 to about 3050. Now due to this shrinking in female population then leading to just shrinking in population in general, wouldn't this then lead to a serious decrease in our global population and be for the better. Could this then mean more resources and less poverty? Although another idea that just came to mind, this situation would benefit India because they value males over females. The male is favored because they inherit land, pass on the family name, and financially provide for the parents. Overall this female population decline just merges a variety of concerns.
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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | population geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

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Videographic: Global fertility

A good video about global population trends since 1950.  The is rich with charts, maps and data (from Hans Rosling it would appear) many about accelerated population growth, total fertility rates.  China, Iran, South Korea and France are all individually showcased to show how global patterns were at play within local settings. 


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Do the dead outnumber the living?

Do the dead outnumber the living? | population geography | Scoop.it
The population of the planet reached seven billion in October last year, according to the United Nations. But what's the figure for all those who have lived before us?

Simple answer, no.  But did it make you think?


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Seth Dixon's comment, February 6, 2012 5:52 PM
Very short answer: no. Yet, how many people have lived in human history? What are the estimates? This article is worth exploring to not at other population issues and debates.
Em Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 8:09 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
melissa Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 8:10 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
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Are We Now in the Twilight of the Exurbs?

Are We Now in the Twilight of the Exurbs? | population geography | Scoop.it
HometownAnnapolis.com - A Web site for Annapolis and Anne Arundel County. Powered by Capital Gazette Communications and The Capital Newspaper.

 

This short article discusses the demographic shift in urban areas since the collapse of the housing bubble (explicitly referencing Burgess' Concentric Zone Model!).  With higher gas prices discouraging long commutes, is the era of sprawl over?  Some feel that suburban housing prices aren't in momentary decline, but that this represents a new normal as we reconceptualize the city and urban land values.  For more on the decline of the Exurbs, see: http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/nation/2012/04/05/growth-exurbs-falls-historic-low/WEsMHqBISD1n60T7WCJdTO/story.html ;     


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If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/


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The BRIC Countries

The BRIC Countries | population geography | Scoop.it
For some time now, Brazil, Russia, India, and China have been grouped together under the acronym BRIC.

 

What are the demographic profiles of these "BRIC" countries that are increasingly looming large in the global consciousness?  While they to not quite fit the profile of more developed countries (MDCs), the BRIC countries are notable for how rapidly they are closing the gap in many metrics. 


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Issues from Global Population Growth

Find In-depth Review, Video And Infographic On World Population. http://www.mapsofworld.com/poll/can-world-population-be-controlled.html Learn more about pop...

 

This video displays some intriguing statistics about global population growth.  Equally important the video explores some concerns that are presented with a large population.  Click on the above link to view all the images as one long infographic.   


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BBC: Urbanization

BBC: Urbanization | population geography | Scoop.it

A fantastic interactive map with population charts that show the massive explosion in urbanization since 1950 until the present.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 8:22 AM
Thanks to my mentor teacher (when I was a student teaching myself in Utah with 9th graders) for finding this link. He's STILL helping me out all these years later...here's to all you mentoring the next generation of educators!
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If the world’s population lived in one city…

If the world’s population lived in one city… | population geography | Scoop.it

This is an very intriguing map that shows different urban layouts and applies the concept of population density at the city scale and compares it to the global population.  What is everyone lived in the city of New York (at New York's population density)?  How big would that city be? 


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MigrationsMap.net

MigrationsMap.net | population geography | Scoop.it
Interactive Migrations Map: Where are migrants coming from? Where have migrants left?

 

This is a great resource for a population unit or in a regional class. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 22, 2011 5:55 PM
My pleasure...There are plenty of demographic links that I have scooped on this page and I hope others can be of use to you.
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U.S. & World Population Clocks

U.S. & World Population Clocks | population geography | Scoop.it

Official U.S. census population clocks for both the United States and the World. 6.9 billion and still ticking.... 


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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine

See photos from 7 Billion: http://bit.ly/hhYz3m With the worldwide population expected to exceed seven billion in 2011, National Geographic magazine offers a...

 

This video provides excellent material for discussing population growth, space and sustainability.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 7:18 PM
After watching the Hans Rosling video, I find it truly fascinating that the entire world’s population can fit within LA. However a solution to a rising global population may rest upon not only who has access to the resources of the world but also how it is used and proportionately divided.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 4:42 PM

The optimistic tone set in this peace was very moving; using the idea that 7 billon people could fit in LA really drove home how massive earth is. When they were showing our population growth it seemed like the graph started to level off. Clearly technology was the reason for the expediential spike and as long as technology can keep up we will create sustainable solutions for everyone in the world.  The ideas are out there they just need to be put into the right hands, 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:01 PM


At the rate we are going we will hit 10 billion in no time because there are people in this world that have more than two kids. The ideal numbers of kid’s people have. There is one show that comes to mind is 19 kids and counting on TLC. They are a family of almost thirty living in one big house. The mother of the bunch is probably in her late 40's and is still having more kids as we speak she is probably pregnant with number 20. They should not have more kids because in no time they will run out of space and have to build a new house that could hold so much people. At the rate they are having kids the world is growing and growing population wise. The world can only hold so much people at a time. One good example is china and being a 3 billion people country and still growing day by day. 10 billion is a lot of people to take care of it will be twice as hard to maintain. There are more children being born than people dyeing. Population growth will affect everyone in regards to food supply and medicine wise.

 

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No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | population geography | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:28 PM

Amazing to see that the birth rates are so low in Europe.  When at one time there were soo many people that many of them were part of the huge immigration to the US in the 19th and early 20th century.  Now some of these nations are having worker shortages as their populations get older.  The result of this is workers from other countries moving into European countries to work and fill the jobs.  This in turn has led to racial tensions in some European countires where people are stating that the jobs are being taken by these foregin workers.  However, it is the people of these countries that have having fewer children, whether it be a lifestyle choice or just plain economic factors.  It becomes a circular argument eventaully.  Will there be a change in the birth rate in Europe?  Only time will tell, but by the looks of itm it is not going to be anytime soon.  

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 2:39 PM
That is very odd because usually it is the Europeans who want to have many kids. It seems that the Europeans are not so interested in having kids. They just want to enjoy their lives to the fullest. Not having kids could be a bad thing for the population. One reason would be the family genes would be gone because there are no more family members to keep it going. There is one good thing to the decrease of population, which are less people to care for in the world. But Europe should have seen this coming because there was at one point in time there were the most populated country now it has changed to the least populated who would have thought that would happen. But having kids is a great accomplishment that not everyone can have. Many people have disease that stop the production of having kids.
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:14 PM

This is showing how in the future due to more woman's rights and better  education systems, woman are losing interest in having babies at an early age. Therefore the population in Europe is declining. 

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7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast?

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial distinctions (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings at different scales). 


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China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population

China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population | population geography | Scoop.it
China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population.

 

China has historically been a predominantly rural country; a major part of the economic growth of the last few decades has been driven my a push towards urbanization.   Now that China is predominantly an urban population, what will that been for resource consumption, development and global economics? 


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Sabrina Gam's curator insight, May 5, 2013 2:00 AM

China & its population is something that we as geographers must be aware of; this ever growing population of people will play a large part to our human geogrpahy. 

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The Russian Cross

The Russian Cross | population geography | Scoop.it

The economic and social turmoil after the fall of the Soviet Union was profound enough to be seen in the demographic statistics.  Birth rates dropped as the death rates went up.  Typically when birth rates drop it is presented as an indicator of social development, but it clearly is not in this instance.  What explains these statistics?  


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:15 AM

Judging by this graphic, overall births have dropped, deaths have risen, and natural growth has plummented since the collapse of the USSR in 1991. Like we discussed in class, perhaps more people in Russia were happier under Communism. Even though they were living under a repressive regime and dissidents were violently silenced, more people had bread on their tables- and we can literally see the effects of better govt provided nutrition on the population in this chart.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 12:17 PM

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, the statistics blatantly followed.  Russia's expansion and development has slowed extremely compared to Soviet rule, and the people have taken the same trend.  Citizens are moving away to find better opportunity, they are literally packing bags and simply leaving without a trace.  When the U.S.S.R. was in full swing, the economy and people were all tightly controlled.  In most cases the regime was strict, but there was controlled order and generally speaking, the people had organization and prosperity.  Though not politically free, there were jobs and workers to fulfill them.  Now, the economy has stooped, which led the social statistics to follow.  Russians are realizing that if they have children, how will they support them?  Their income shows it is hard to support others and therefore birth rates have dropped.  Ultimately, it's no wonder the overall natural growth of Russia has drastically dropped within the last 20 years.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:35 PM


This is just like Europe it is incredible how these big countries little by little are becoming much smaller in population because their citizens do not want to have more kids. Russia and Europe have a big problem in there hands that will affect them in the future.

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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | population geography | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


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Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | population geography | Scoop.it
There are “babyloids” and relatives-for-rent in an increasingly childless Japan.

 

While many parts of the world are concerned with population growth, Japan is struggling to find ways to slow down the demographic decline.  What economic and cultural forces are leading the the changing nature of Japanese demographics?  A video that explains the changing nature of modern Japanese relationships and gender norms can be accessed here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/30/japan-population-decline-youth-no-sex_n_1242014.html


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 9:52 PM
This article helps to see why population is declining so rapidly in Japan. There is not just one contributing factor, but many factors. There is a high suicide rate and low birth rate. Many single Japanese women decide not to have children, while countries such as the US, many single women choose to have children. Japan's high divorce rate will also cause decline in population. Al of these factors that contribute to the decline in Japan's population is hurting the economy. If the population does not start to increase, Japan will be further in trouble.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:21 PM

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.