population geography
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population growth patterns, causes and consequences
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VIDEO: TED Talk by Hans Rosling on global population growth

TED Talks The world's population will grow to 9 billion over the next 50 years -- and only by raising the living standards of the poorest can we check population growth.

 

TED talks are great resources, and this one about global population growth, is a great link with Hans Roslings trademark data visualizations that simplifiy complex data and 'tell the story,' but this time using far more common visual aids.


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Ken Morrison's comment, September 29, 2012 10:01 PM
Hello. Sorry about the suggestion. I thought I was posting that to my site. Have a great day. I really like your site. Ken
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:28 PM

Unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:25 AM

This is a brilliant video to help you understand the QoL and SoL linked to population. 

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Global and National Population Pyramids

Global and National Population Pyramids | population geography | Scoop.it
Interactive Visualization of the Population Pyramids of the World from 1950 to 2050...

 

Need population pyramids?  This is a site with good global and national population pyramids with good temporal data as well to show changes in the population (good for explaining the demographic transition model).   


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MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

If you struggle with population structure - this visualisation may be useful. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:09 PM

This website allows the user to look into the past, and into the future of population all over the world. The population pyramids show the distribution between young and elder people. It is very interesting to see how the pyramid is able to show the predicted population pyramid of the future as well. 

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 6:39 PM

Access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation - Population pyramids show population of different ages from each gender in a certain country. From population pyramids, you can conclude a country's development level. For example, if there is an equal population of all ages, this means that they have amazing health care, great education to educate women about birth control towards population, and good sanitation. From all of this information, you can tell how developed a country may be and perhaps also whether the country has many cities And urbanization. 

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Lesson Plans - Population Reference Bureau

Lesson Plans - Population Reference Bureau | population geography | Scoop.it

Over 10 lesson plans for teaching demographics, migration, the demographic transition and more.  Included is a teaching packet, "making population real" specifically for the AP curriculum produced by the venerable Martha Sharma. 


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U.S. & World Population Clocks

U.S. & World Population Clocks | population geography | Scoop.it

Official U.S. census population clocks for both the United States and the World. 6.9 billion and still ticking.... 


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James Hobson's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:20 PM

North America topic 9)

Being a person who likes interactive maps and graphics, I found this website and its data to be especially interesting. I remember seeing the same graphics displayed a few years ago at the Boston Museum of Science. Aside from the actual clock, it was interesting to observe the distribution-by-age graphic, and use its slider bar to see the change over time. Right away I could pick out the year the "baby boom" started. Another discrete trend I noticed is that the percent of the U.S. population aged 100+ has gone up lately (though by hundreds of a percent), which reflects recent medical advances and confirms hypotheses previously made that this would happen.

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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine

See photos from 7 Billion: http://bit.ly/hhYz3m With the worldwide population expected to exceed seven billion in 2011, National Geographic magazine offers a...

 

This video provides excellent material for discussing population growth, space and sustainability.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

The increase in global population is definitely a hot button topic in today's world. Many wonder if the planet will be able to really sustain so many new people, and if it can truly sustain our current number of humans. This video does a good job of addressing these problems and presenting how things will likely come to be. Our planet is capable of producing great amounts of food and material the real hurdle comes down to how well nations will cooperate. Unfortunately politics and money seem to be the real snagging point in the distribution of aid and resources to many.  

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:25 PM

The rapid growth occurring is staggering.  I believe we do need to start thinking about the future in generations.  Where will we be in 50-100 years and where do we need to be.  So basically you need to start thinking about your childrens' childrens' future.  We need to make changes to sustain the increase in population.  

Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 10:55 PM

Geography - Human Population in senior school

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No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | population geography | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:11 PM

Unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:06 AM

11 billion people projection for the future but a decline in population in Europe? How? What factors altered this? Why? 

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:36 PM

This article discusses the population decrease in Southern Italy. The small city called Laviano is now deserted because of the extremely low birth rate. Rocco Falivena, the major, says that he proposed a system to get women to produce more babies. Pregnant women will receive 10,000 euros over the years if they produce a baby. Even with this system the population remains to be decreasing. 


The dramatic decrease of this small city will have huge economic consequences. This city is an example of the opposite that is happening globally and proves that the world needs a stable population and not a population decline. 

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Day vs. Night population maps

Day vs. Night population maps | population geography | Scoop.it

A great image for showing the pulsating rythmns of a dynamic urban system.  We treat population density as a static metric, but how many people are in a given place would truly be difficult to fully quantify.  What logisitic difficulties would this shift present for cities?  


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Wildcardspades58's comment, December 16, 2011 11:44 AM
I would be interested to find out how these were created and how the data was recorded.
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 10:44 AM
There is not much Definiton on this map......
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Urbanizing the Suburban Street

Urbanizing the Suburban Street | population geography | Scoop.it
A community tries some relatively pain-free fixes to make its streets greener and more walkable...

 

One of the most challenging aspects of suburbs, and of the prescriptions for improving them, is the character of their roadways. Most of us take the poor design of our streets – the most visible part of most suburban communities, if you think about it – so much for granted that it never occurs to us that they actually could be made better for the community and for the environment.

Consider, for example, main "arterial" streets so wide that pedestrians can’t cross them, even if there is a reason to; little if any greenery to absorb water, heat, or provide a calming influence; or residential streets with no sidewalks.

This is where Montgomery County’s new street-scape initiative comes in. It has done some things right, including the preservation of much of its farmland – in part by channeling growth into the central districts of Bethesda and Silver Spring, both served by D.C.’s rail transit system, and more recently by encouraging walkable redevelopment along the notoriously sprawled-out Rockville Pike corridor.


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Hunger Games: Map of Panem

Hunger Games: Map of Panem | population geography | Scoop.it

As a former children's librarian, this is the perfect merger of some of my interests.  The Hunger Games, a Young Adult dystopian novel (movie coming soon) takes place in a post-WWIII North America with 13 districts noted for particular resources.  For example, district 4 specialized in fishing and district 12's economy centered on coal.  For middle schools that teach integrate units with social studies and English, this would be a very engaging, current connection. 


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picky's comment, March 21, 2012 5:40 PM
Phoenix, AZ, at 1100ft above present sea level, is shown underwater. Cincinnati, OH, at 900ft above present sea level, is shown still above water. This map makes no sense. Using a Panem map for teaching geology is a great idea, but don't use it to reinforce the false idea that "farther inland" means "higher."
Seth Dixon's comment, March 21, 2012 7:57 PM
Certainly this isn't a geologically accurate map (just like Waterworld was a fictitious world that couldn't exist). Yet in the book Hunger Games, there are elements of North American geography that are a part of this fictitious geography, even if it is not expected to be geographically accurate. Your point is most certainly well taken that further inland does not mean higher elevation.
Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:39 PM

This map of the Hunger Games location can help a young adult to make connections to the world we live in and with a movie/book that many children and adults adore. The districts all have different specialities and are spread out on a United States Map, I as a student would have the opportunity to see that where I live today would not be part of the districts post WWIII. This map could start a debate and discussion about English ( the book ) as well as Social Studies( the map) making connections to the world we live in today. Another way that this map can help children to learn is to place an actual map over the Panem map to help children become intrigued and see what could happen if there was a WWIII.

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7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast?

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial distinctions (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings at different scales). 


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:44 AM

This video shows how the populations of each country  are  increasing and decreasing in a very unique way. It explains how the populations are increasing and decreasing as the years go on.  It also shows that the death rates and the birth rates are  being combined to make the true populations as accurate as possible.

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 9:13 PM

This video is good at helping people better visualize population because you can easily see the difference of each continent. It shows how the population started small and rapidly expanded because of the agricultural and industrial revolution and decrease in deaths making it and the births unstablized. It even goes on to talk about the future population and how it is believed that the population won't continue to grow rapidly but once again stabalize.

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China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population

China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population | population geography | Scoop.it
China's Urban Population Now Exceeds 50% of Population.

 

China has historically been a predominantly rural country; a major part of the economic growth of the last few decades has been driven my a push towards urbanization.   Now that China is predominantly an urban population, what will that been for resource consumption, development and global economics? 


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Sabrina Gam's curator insight, May 5, 2013 5:00 AM

China & its population is something that we as geographers must be aware of; this ever growing population of people will play a large part to our human geogrpahy. 

Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 9, 2014 6:15 PM

The population in China is still exceeding in spite of the safety regulations that they've set to limit their population growth. With their population being 20% of the worlds population China is the most populous country in the world. One in five people is a resident of China, but with recent studies statistics show that by 2040 India will exceed 1.52 billion. ~R.J~

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:26 AM

We constantly talk about the one child policy - this is also another near future concern in China.  

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | population geography | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 7:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 5:58 PM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

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Do the dead outnumber the living?

Do the dead outnumber the living? | population geography | Scoop.it
The population of the planet reached seven billion in October last year, according to the United Nations. But what's the figure for all those who have lived before us?

Simple answer, no.  But did it make you think?


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Seth Dixon's comment, February 6, 2012 8:52 PM
Very short answer: no. Yet, how many people have lived in human history? What are the estimates? This article is worth exploring to not at other population issues and debates.
Em Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 11:09 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
melissa Marin's comment, February 7, 2012 11:10 AM
wow... it is so mind boggling just thinking about how I am just one person, amongst billions, and billions more that have since passed. It certainly makes me question my existance and significance or lack there of...
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If the world’s population lived in one city…

If the world’s population lived in one city… | population geography | Scoop.it

This is an very intriguing map that shows different urban layouts and applies the concept of population density at the city scale and compares it to the global population.  What is everyone lived in the city of New York (at New York's population density)?  How big would that city be? 


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MigrationsMap.net

MigrationsMap.net | population geography | Scoop.it
Interactive Migrations Map: Where are migrants coming from? Where have migrants left?

 

This is a great resource for a population unit or in a regional class. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 22, 2011 8:55 PM
My pleasure...There are plenty of demographic links that I have scooped on this page and I hope others can be of use to you.
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Why Density Works

Why Density Works | population geography | Scoop.it

"A study of 339 present-day hunter-gatherer groups demonstrated that after 'every doubling of population, the home ranges of [those] groups increased by only 70 percent': Every additional person requires less land than the previous one."

 

This is a very quick, but scientific explanation of why living in dense configurations works.  Not that it's without problems, but it's functionality in an era of population growth is clear.   

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China's village of the bachelors: no wives in sight in remote settlement

China's village of the bachelors: no wives in sight in remote settlement | population geography | Scoop.it
Surplus of males caused by preference for sons means poor subsistence farmers have no chance of finding a mate...

 

One-child policy, gender preference, rural-urban divide in modernizing China...the list of applications goes on. 


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:33 PM

I don’t understand how China could kill Chinese girl’s baby’s and not see 20 years down the road how that would affect there country. Even if it’s the family doing it because the boys can work and help the family eat, the government should have created job opportunities for girls motivating the poorer families to raise there children equally.  Maybe they wanted to thin overpopulation in china so they skipped a generation, it seems horrible but empires have done terrible things in history to maintain power.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:23 PM


This was going to happen anyways because china having that one child rule was going to imbalance the population more males less females. Those rules being in place family members were forced to have boys because they would be the one to take over and inherent the land its parents left them. If they would have a girl they that land will go to the husbands family and plus boys would be the favorite child because they can work much faster than what a girl would. That being said the girls would be given up or killed. Now china has millions of males and little females. Which makes it difficult for the males to get married and have children of their own.

The ratio to males to females is six to one talk about crazy. But now that china has allowed a family to have two children instead of one. Now over the years we will see and increase in females and as well as males because of the imbalance of the country. But china allowing to have more than one kid will come at a price because

that is more people they have to maintain and china already being overpopulated will make it even worse for them.

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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | population geography | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:05 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about how many countries in the world are experiencing a shrinking population in women. In about 83 countries women are going on marriage strikes by refusing to get married. This has caused a severe drop in the amount of women being born. There are predictions that some countries such as Hong Kong will see their last woman born in the year 2798. Many places are now trying to encourage people to have daughters in order to offset the low female composition. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it deals with population and sex composition. In man countries the female population is dramatically dropping and scientist are predicting women to die out. This also relates to government policies because some places are trying to change the outcome and encourage females. This shows what technology and visualization of populations can do to predict the future. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:25 PM

Summary:  This article provides an optimistic outlook on future population growth.  Stating that in wealthy countries and cities with no migration population may even disappear.  

 

Insight:  While this article seems very hard to believe considering what we've learned I think it represents Unit 2 very well because it still analyzes population growth over time based on female wealth.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:36 PM

This article illustrated how women are becoming more independent and educated. The article tells you that women, "... are preferring the single life, to marital yoke." This leads to the decrease of fertility rates. As women start to focus more on themselves and their career; instead of building a family, they tend to wait on having kids. This trend is occuring especially in Asian countries. Statistics from the UN conclude that if fertility rates don't increase, in 83 countries, women will not have daughters to replace them. For example Hong Kong, it is predicted that 1,000 women will only produce 547 daughters. The drop is now having reseachers predict when populations will see, "...birth of its last women". The female population in Hong will decrease from 3.75 million to 1 million in 25 generations. Researchers say Hong Kong will see the last, "...birth of its last women" in 2798!  The article used a country-year diagram to show what year the countries will see the last birth of its women.

 

This article relates to topics in Unit 2: Population and Migration. It uses a composition model to organize and efficiently show its data. The article and model shows patterns of fertility and prediction and facts of how a change in the lifestyle of women are affecting populations all over the world. Populations are greatly affected to the point where they can become eradicated. The article was really interesting and I was surprised at how short the predicted amount of time is for the last birth of a women in a population. This article also really illustrates and reveal how women play a big part in - what was- a man dominating world.

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GoAnimate Video on Push and Pull Factors of Migration

GoAnimate Video on Push and Pull Factors of Migration | population geography | Scoop.it

This video shows several of the push and pull factors which can influence people to immigrate from one place to another: this video shows why people may leave one place to move to another.


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Pavan Sukhdev: Put a value on nature!

TED Talks Every day, we use materials from the earth without thinking, for free. But what if we had to pay for their true value: would it make us more careful about what we use and what we waste?

 

Companies derive economic value from the environment without paying the true environmental costs of their enterprises.  Sukhdev call this the 'Economic Invisibilty of Nature.'  Many countries are mortgaging their environment's future for economic growth today.  This also disproportionately impacts the developing world and rural people more adversely.  Key to his argument is that we need to identify negative externalities on the environment that produce private profits and acknowledge them as public losses.  


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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:13 PM

This a very interesting topic. Most of the time we take our earth for granted imagine if we need to pay for every time we use our earth I don’t think we would to afford it. Is very important for us to take care of it. It so sad that we have to force to protect it; for example here in providence we get punish with a fine if we don’t recycle. Taking care of our world should be a feeling from within people shouldn’t be made to do it.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:15 AM

Nature is very important because everyone in the world depends on it because that is where we can get the oxygen that we need to live and also we can hunt for food because many people in this world do not have access to a supermarket because it is to far or they just don’t believe in the existence of a supermarket. I wonder why some people would decide to live so far from civilization because I could not do that. I would get depressed very quickly because there would be nothing to do there.

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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | population geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:33 PM

In my opinion, I do not think that the world could be approaching stage 5. I'm not sure if the world as a whole will ever reach stage 5. Our population is increasing and even though birth rates are low I still think that stage 4 is where we will be stuck. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 6:52 PM

This article discusses the demographic transition model, mostly Stage 5. Stage 5 is still slightly an unknown thing, because many people argue whether there are any countries in that phase or not. Stage 5 is characterized with very low birth rates, low death rates, lots of family oriented planning, and a slow decrease in population. Some people argue Germany is already in this stage, but I don't really agree. 

I think we should focus more on the developing countries that are stuck in stage 2. 

USA is in stage 4, and I believe that we will be stuck here for a while before advancing to stage 5. 

This is a good article for people that are interested in this unit to read, it gives a new perspective on things. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:44 AM

Summary- With his Demographic Transition Model, Warren Thompson suggested that we are in the midst of a transition shown by stage 4, in which birth rates are equaling death rates. But if we analyze the demography in the present day, we will find that we are already past that stage. Most countries in the world are now entering or already in stage 5, in which birth rates are lower than death rates, making it very difficult, if not impossible for the population to grow. These current trends have led to an increased empowerment of women in western countries, since less babies mean more working hours, and more profits. It has also allowed for inter-generational relationships within families, where a children is able to meet his grandparents and even his great grandparents. In Europe, the birth rate is currently below the replacement level. The only way Europe has been able to increase or at least maintain its population is through waves of immigration.

 

Insight- it's is incredible that we are taught that we are experiencing the fourth stage of the Demographic Transition model, and that stage 5 talks about the future. What we may have not noticed is that many countries of the world are already part of that future; they have started to be part of this stage without us realizing it. I really liked the prediction made in the last paragraph. The fertility increase in more developed countries can take us to a new stage 6 in Thompson's model.

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Civic Problems in Deindustrialized Urban America

Civic Problems in Deindustrialized Urban America | population geography | Scoop.it
The following is a post from David Schalliol, the Visiting Assistant Professor of Social Sciences at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

 

This is photoessay focuses on urban decay in a deindustrializing cities in the United States.  The goal is not to strictly bemoan the urban blight and see these ares as 'victims of decline,' but to also acknowledge the community that has emerged despite the economic hardships. 


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Videographic: Global fertility

A good video about global population trends since 1950.  The is rich with charts, maps and data (from Hans Rosling it would appear) many about accelerated population growth, total fertility rates.  China, Iran, South Korea and France are all individually showcased to show how global patterns were at play within local settings. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:40 PM

Unit 2

 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:54 PM

This video shows how the global population has changed throughout time. It illustrates how the population went on a massive incline, and based on the DTM, will soon go onto the decline as more countries become developed. 

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The Millennials: Infographic

The Millennials: Infographic | population geography | Scoop.it

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Megan Paux's comment, January 30, 2012 2:17 PM
I feel like I should be offended by being so categorized as a generaton, but strangely I'm not. I think this graphic accurately represents people my age.
Kyle M Norton's comment, January 30, 2012 2:44 PM
Gen X is going to have a lot of problems to fix that was left for them by their ancestors
LMullen's comment, February 2, 2012 5:14 PM
Interesting to see that the millennials were the least green, its pushed so heavily now.
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Megacities @ National Geographic Magazine

Megacities @ National Geographic Magazine | population geography | Scoop.it

By 2030, 2 out of 3 people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a review of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Lagos, Bangkok and Hyderabad.


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