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population geography
population growth patterns, causes and consequences
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America's suburban future

America's suburban future | population geography | Scoop.it

"If you think American cities are sprawling now, just wait until 2025. In that time, the U.S. population will grow by 18 percent but the amount of developed land will increase 57 percent. Up to 9.2 percent of the lower 48 could be urbanized by then. And while that number includes cities and the infrastructure to support them—roads, rail, power lines, and so on—that number does not include land impacted by farming, logging, mining, or mineral extraction."


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mderder's comment, February 19, 2012 5:16 PM
The US has already fallen behind most other first world nations in public transportation. The reliance on the automobile, which enabled the growth of our suburbs, needs to be slowly phased out, and major rail lines need to be laid to serve as the backbone for our future urban/suburban transportation network. Rail is FAR cheaper than cars. Cars, in a sensible future, will be thought of as transport for short trips. Hopefully we will be mainly electric with those 50 years from now as well. It is good for the environment and good for our pocketbook. Classic win/win.
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Radiant City

Radiant City | population geography | Scoop.it
In this feature length film Gary Burns, Canada's king of surreal comedy, joins journalist Jim Brown on an outing to the suburbs.

 

This 2006 documentary is a critical look at suburbia that has comments from suburbanites interspersed with planners, real estate agents, experts and urban academics. 


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Chris St. Clair's comment, April 27, 2012 2:03 PM
I've showed this movie once in a while during the Urban unit and the kids enjoy it. "Edutainment"
Seth Dixon's comment, April 27, 2012 7:09 PM
It seems a mixture of vignettes, with some academic founding mixed in. Warning: There was one F-bomb in the movie.
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How future urban sprawl maps out

How future urban sprawl maps out | population geography | Scoop.it
Projections of urban growth indicate areas where biodiversity is at high risk.

 

The AAG Smart Brief is a fantastic source of geographic news.  This is what they said about this article:  "Areas such as tropical Africa and eastern China are expected to be hot spots of urbanization during the next several years, according to researchers, who used satellite imagery and other data to project future urban expansion through 2030. 'We're not forecasting population, we're forecasting the expansion of urban space,' said Yale University geographer Karen Seto. Their efforts could be used to assist conservation initiatives, Seto noted."

 

Tags: AAG, urban, sprawl, land use, urban ecology, biogeography, unit 7 cities, environment.


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Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 24, 2013 7:56 AM
This article is about urban growth and decline, Africa and Asia are predicted to be hot spots of urban growth in the next few years. Geographer Karen Seto of Yale University in New Haven has creted a graph that finally accounts for variations in how individual cities occupy their land and the impact they have on local ecosystems.
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Satellite Images of Urban Sprawl

Satellite Images of Urban Sprawl | population geography | Scoop.it
The past century has been defined by an epic migration of people from rural areas to the city. In 2008, for the first time in history, more of the Earth's population was living in cities than in the countryside.

 

This image gallery is designed "to present images from space [that] track the relentless spread of humanity."  The 'slide bar' in the middle allows the viewer to scroll between before and after images of major metropolitan areas that have experienced dramatic growth in the last 10-30 years.  The attached images is on Dubai, UAE.  Notice the man-made islands, especially the 'archipelago' in the shape of the world that is 2.5 miles off the coast of Dubai.


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America's romance with sprawl may be over

America's romance with sprawl may be over | population geography | Scoop.it
Three years after the recession officially ended, Census county population estimates show Americans are staying put or moving to cities.

 

The recession and foreclosure crisis really hurt many suburban families and the values of suburban homes.   This interactive map is helps students to notice the patterns that shape the changing demographic patterns connected to urbanization. 


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