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population geography
population growth patterns, causes and consequences
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The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | population geography | Scoop.it
After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week.

 

While the damage wasn't as bad as many feared it could have been, place and spatial context are especially important in assessing the impacts of a natural disaster.  This is a excellent collection of the many devastating images as a result of Hurricane Sandy.  To see some more local images, Rhode Island Department of Transportation put this collection together.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:18 PM
I am speechless, these images have just torn my heart. Here in Providence, Rhode Island listened to multiple people say "oh this storm was nothing" they apparently need to view these photos, to understand Sandy was a monster of a storm. Mother nature is powerful and she can do just about anything. I am so mind boggled by the images, roads completely torn apart I never knew this could happen from a hurricane. It really made me appreciate how safe I was but now seeing these images really makes me want to get out there and tell more people to look at what happened in NJ,CT,NYC, and other places around the coast. My next step now is to get a donation bin started to send over to those states in major need. This is sure another natural disaster to go down in history.
Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Just with the information given, I can see how much damage the storm actually caused. Flooding and high winds obviously don't go together well. Although some communities weren't hit as bad as previously anticipated, some areas were largely damaged and the money needed to rebuild will be tremendous.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:14 AM
I think it is very sad. I didn't know it was that bad. Now that I see those pictures it makes me feel very bad for those people.
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Living in the New Metropolis

Living in the New Metropolis | population geography | Scoop.it
Documenting the megacities of our time....

 

Over half of humanity is living in cities and that statistic is likely to reach 70% by 2050.  Studying the urban environment, especially the 'megacities' (cities with populations over 10 million people) which are growing especially fast, becomes increasingly important.  This photo gallery of the worlds 23 megacites employs long exposure images, with highlights the movements and dynamism of the urban networks.  To see the gallery and this stunning image of Jakarta's rush hour traffic, visit: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2012/05/06/sunday-review/06METROPOLIS.html?ref=sunday#4   


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Satellite Images of Urban Sprawl

Satellite Images of Urban Sprawl | population geography | Scoop.it
The past century has been defined by an epic migration of people from rural areas to the city. In 2008, for the first time in history, more of the Earth's population was living in cities than in the countryside.

 

This image gallery is designed "to present images from space [that] track the relentless spread of humanity."  The 'slide bar' in the middle allows the viewer to scroll between before and after images of major metropolitan areas that have experienced dramatic growth in the last 10-30 years.  The attached images is on Dubai, UAE.  Notice the man-made islands, especially the 'archipelago' in the shape of the world that is 2.5 miles off the coast of Dubai.


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