Geography Class T...
Follow
Find
50 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by megan b clement from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Malala confronts Obama

Malala confronts Obama | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
Washington (CNN) -- The "Bravest Girl in the World" has stood up to President Barack Obama.

Via Seth Dixon
megan b clement's insight:

Malala is a very brave young girl. To go through what she has gone through to fight for the rights of education in her country. Despite threats from terror groups she continued to fight for her and her people's rights. She is an advocate for women's rights and was shot by the Taliban. She feels that her country is so against women and their right to education because if women are educated they are more powerful. She confront Obama about all the threats and attacks innocent people's lives are taken in result. She did not care that it was an uncomfortable topic she did not care. She felt the need to address it so she did.

 

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:11 PM

First she stands up to the Taliban risking her life.  Some skeptics thought that she was then used as a pawn; a puppet for other people.  Hearing her interview with Jon Stewart was enough to convince me that she was an authentic voice for change, even if she's been coached and others are help her script her message.  But going after Obama for drone attacks?  She really is amazing. 

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 13, 2013 7:02 PM

In the words of Jon Stewart - "Malala...I don't know where you came from, but I sure am glad you are here."

Who said young people can't solve problems!? Go Malala!!!!

Rescooped by megan b clement from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Oktoberfest 2013

Oktoberfest 2013 | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
The beer halls are empty and steins put away from the 180th Oktoberfest in Munich. The world's largest traditional Bavarian beer festival, celebrated by an estimated 6 million visitors, wrapped up last Sunday.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Renata Hill's comment, October 14, 2013 6:52 PM
I so want to attend this festival some time!
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:06 AM
In Munich the world's largest Bavarian beer festival Oktoberfest is a good time for the millions of visitors. Only six local brewers beers were featured in this festival. The festival starts on September 21st and goes through to October 6th. It is a good time for all!
Rescooped by megan b clement from Social Media Classroom
Scoop.it!

They Loved Your G.P.A. Then They Saw Your Tweets.

They Loved Your G.P.A. Then They Saw Your Tweets. | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
More colleges are finding the social media posts of their applicants — and sometimes denying admission as a result.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2013 9:44 AM

I'm not saying that I thrilled about all of the ramifications of this new trend, but students need to realize that online posts can be read by more than just their friends and understand the implications of that fact. 

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 11, 2013 3:40 PM

A social online reputation is  important to all of us including students. This is a look at how that can reputation can effect college entry at the moment.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:09 AM
After reading this article it goes to show that my father is right once again. He always told me what i put on the internet is there forever, but not only that it could inhibit me from getting a job that i wanted. Just like the article my father told me that alot of jobs look at your social media sights and pages to see what kind of person you portray yourself to be. Alot of jobs will not hire you due to your social media pages! who would have though
Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:34 AM

Shipping containers has helped mordern globalization in many ways. The amount of trade we do with other countries allows for a cheaper process. The amount of items we can trade now because of containerization is way more than we did with trucks. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:16 AM
Containers have become such an essential part of our economy and shipping all together. SHipping in containers and on ships is not only cost effective but they can use machines to load them onto the decks of the ships. You can fit an obscene amount of product in the containers as well. The containers are also completely private you cannot see into the container so people are less likely to steal if they are unable to know what is inside.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 5, 11:50 PM

We discussed how the container has transformed the global economy. These videos show how a simple tee shirt is made from cotton in the US, labor in Columbia, Indonesia, and Bangladesh. In the 1950s Malcolm McLean developed the first shipping container industry and transformed the global economy. Due to the fact that these containers can hold some many items, shipping goods from place to place makes manufacturing a global process. Economic geographies were completely revamped by the innovation of McLean, now a making a tee shirt connects the economies of many nations. A piece of clothing being sold in the United States now is connected to labor across the globe. 

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Impacts of the Demographic Transition

Impacts of the Demographic Transition | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
A look at how the notion of family is evolving in this country. 

Via Seth Dixon
more...
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:35 AM
This article talks about how the new Canadian Family. How the traditional family used to have children and people were getting married. Now people not only do not necessarily get married, but they also may not even have children either. It just shows how times and the people are changing from the older and more traditional days.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 10:35 AM

This infographic is showing a shift which has occured over the last several decades from larger, traditional families to smaller, multicultural, non-traditional families. This infographic concerns Canada, but the reduced birthrate is a problem for many developed countries in Europe as well. While the multi-cultural and same-sex families likely have no negative effects, the rise in lone parent families is problematic as single parents have an increased financial burden while raising children. The low birthrate, when lower than replacement level (2.0 per woman), will likely lead to a stalling economy to be outpaced by growing nations.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 12:45 PM

How exactly will a shifting family demographic affect us?  We can only speculate.  This phenomenon happening in Canada is also happening in most developed like the United States and Japan.  The problem with analyzing specific demographics like this one, is that they are taken out of cultural (local and global) context.  There are many things that may be influencing the familial demographic shift.  More people are moving into cities, where life is busy, fast-paced, "anonymous", and space-limited.  Having kids does not seem very conducive in this setting.  Are we as humans actually creating issues for ourselves?  Are we creating different meanings for "family"?  Are we adapting to our ever-changing world?  This issue will prove to be a mix of all of these things.  ...Maybe there is even an unseen, unfelt ecological and physiological cue to stop procreating when there are too many within a population?  However people who do not want children, have to ask themselves "why?"  Is being selfish really worth removing humans that much further from the natural harmony of the world?

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'?

Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'? | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it

"American tragedies occur where middle America frequents every day: airplanes, business offices, marathons. Where there persists a tangible fear that this could happen to any of us. And rightfully so. Deaths and mayhem anywhere are tragic. That should always be the case. The story here is where American tragedies don't occur. American tragedies don't occur on the southside of Chicago or the New Orleans 9th Ward."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2013 9:29 AM

This is a controversial Op-Ed article that discusses how place and the major axes of identity (race, class and gender) shape and intersect with the the national memory of violence and the media portrayal of violence.  According the David Dennis, "The media seems to forget about New Orleans and any place that the middle class can't easily relate to." 


Tags: race, class, gender, place.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 7:09 PM

It is truly amazing how much location has an impact on society and the way we view things. When we experienced such tragedy's as the Boston Marathon bombing or Columbine it was national news. The city was in an uproar and no matter what radio station you had on or what tv channel you were watching you were hearing about it. Everyone was mourning for those families and people effected by the tragedies. When you think about it, those sort of things are not expected to happen in those places which is what makes it so upsetting to people. Because it is not expected to happen there it becomes national news. However what does that mean about places like compton, New Orleans, and etc? Since people expect violent things to happen there it doesn't make national news because it is of no surpise to anyone that something like that were to happen there. Even if it is expected that doesn't make it right. The shooting at the mother's day parade should be treated like any other tragedy. Unfortunately the location of the tragedy makes it "less" of a tragedy in the eyes on the public because "those sort of things always happen there". It is amazing how much our perception of location can taint the way we see tragedy. It shouldn't be that way, but unfortunetly it's what happens in the world today. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:44 AM
New Orleans has been struggling even through Katrina to get some recognition that even though their society is not necessarily rich they deserve the same respect as anyone else would. To think especially after what New England endured with the Marathon Bombing to see something like this happen and not even really be recognized nationally is sad. These are people just like everyone else and they deserve to be treated the same as everyone else.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

Rescooped by megan b clement from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
“This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships.” Seth Dixon‘s insight: The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and technology.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the...

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:59 AM
Ships shipping ships shows how shipping product on ships is become such a huge aspect of production and transportation. It is not only time effective and you never have to worry about traffic, but it is also cheap to travel on the water.
Daniel Kalfas's curator insight, October 15, 12:44 AM

Shipping is one of the biggest industries in the world economy, and has been used for anything from the transportation of food stuffs from one place to another, or the transportation of people from one place to another. However we are seeing a dwindling of the later, while the majority of our products have traveled over the water the majority of our people have not. This decline has happened mainly because of the invention of air travel. With the advent of air travel people are able to relocate and move to a new place within a matter of hours .   

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Dubai Skyline In The Fog

The Dubai Skyline In The Fog | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it

Now this is an amazing sight...no doubt where the main boulevard is. 


Via axelletess, Seth Dixon
more...
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:01 AM
Dubai a country that has developed itself. It is a country that is extremely rich and beautiful.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 9:02 PM

This is pretty cool. You can tell how  high that main strip of buildings are. Very unique 

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
Wealthy cities seem to have it all. Expansive, well-manicured parks. Fine dining. Renowned orchestras and theaters. More trees. Wait, trees?

 

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (for a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning, see: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204607002174 ). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? For more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees (and to share your own), see: http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/income-inequality-seen-from-space/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:00 AM
this short article explains the evidence supporting tree to rich cities ratio. it goes to show that if I'm going to pay big bucks for location I would want the scenery to be beautiful hands down. they mention the per capita increase to tree ratio and how its only a dollar that influences such a high quantity of trees in city. bottom line is that it makes sense for the more trees in wealthier neighborhoods of the city because when your in the heart of the city you tend to see quantity of quality of homes and being jammed packed into small square footage doesn't leave much room for nature. but go just outside the city where the real estate is high and more spacious and you will find more trees the further and further from the center.
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:04 AM
Like a previous article it explains how if viewing a neighborhood with lush grass and huge yards with landscaped grounds it is associated with big money. People pay top dollar for houses that have huge back yards and privacy of trees. You would not see yards like this is the city though so these neighborhoods on the outskirts of the citylines.
Shaun Scallan's curator insight, January 27, 11:48 PM

Interesting the value, in the broadest sense, that trees can bring in an urban setting

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

"nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke..."


Via Seth Dixon
megan b clement's insight:

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

more...
Izzy Bennett's comment, October 7, 2013 4:03 PM
The company is much larger than I thought it was and this is quite interesting how big it has gotten. The fact that so many people drink this product is amazing!
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:57 PM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion. 

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."


Via Seth Dixon
megan b clement's insight:

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 6, 2013 8:30 AM

This video and article briefly show the reasons behind the current tension between Spain, NATO allies and fellow EU members.  The deeper, underlying issues though are all fundamentally rooted in the complex local political geography.  As an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea, there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. Spain, in what the chief Minister of Gibraltar calls "sabre-rattling," is flexing its muscles and considering using their border and airspace as a political leverage.  Spain is upset that Gibraltar has created an artificial reef in waters that their fishermen use.  Spanish fisherman have recently condemned the escalating political rhetoic.


Questions to Ponder: Why are both parties politically and culturally invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British suprantional connections impact this issue?


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, Spain, Europe, autonomy.

karenpinney's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:13 AM

Relationships between Britain and Spain.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World

12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it

This is a great set of images that show coastal processes for a geomorphology or physical geography class.  Pictured above is Palm Bay, Australia, which also happens to show fluvial processes as well.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Cultural Geography
Scoop.it!

Masculinity, Bullying and the Locker Room

Masculinity, Bullying and the Locker Room | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it

The Dolphins have indefinitely suspended Incognito for conduct detrimental to the team because his actions [against Martin], if true, are morally abominable and potential violations of workplace laws. Still, there are NFL personnel people and active and former players who believe Martin handled the situation poorly by allowing it to spill out of the locker room and into the public.

That's not to say they're defending Incognito. They're not in any way, shape or form. But they do believe there is an unwritten rule that player business should be handled in the locker room by the players themselves, particularly when the actions are as vile as those attributed to Incognito. "I think Jonathan Martin is a weak person," said one personnel man, speaking on the condition of anonymity. [do I even need to point out the hypocrisy of calling someone weak in character and NOT putting their name on the record?!?]


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, November 5, 2013 6:13 PM

Isn't hiding and keeping the "locker room" mentality exactly what helped abusers like Jerry Sandusky at Penn State?

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, November 5, 2013 6:13 PM

Isn't hiding and keeping the "locker room" mentality exactly what helped abusers like Jerry Sandusky at Penn State?

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:00 AM
In Miami players Incognito and Martin had some locker room differences with one another. Incognito was accused of bullying Martin. Although completely in the wrong the NFL and many other poeple believe that Martin should have confronted him in the locker room or went to the coach. Instead he leaked it to the press and it became a public issue.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Social Media Classroom
Scoop.it!

Once blocked, Twitter and other social media become classroom tools

Once blocked, Twitter and other social media become classroom tools | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
In-class use of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have traditionally been discouraged in most K-12 schools, but that’s starting to change in more classrooms.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 3, 2013 2:59 PM

Cell phones are a tremendous distraction for students, but that same distraction can very easily become a powerful tool.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:12 AM
Although social media may have its down falls but now schools are jumping on board and using social media to engage students in their classes. I mean its not a bad idea you know they are going to be on it anyways so if you send updates for class on those social media sights at least you know they will defintely see it and there will be no excuses.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Out of nowhere: U football player comes from dusty California outpost

Out of nowhere: U football player comes from dusty California outpost | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it

Cedric Thompson retraced some of the steps that led him from L.A. to a dusty California outpost to, finally, the Gophers football team.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 19, 2013 5:20 PM

It is amazing how much the location of where you live can influence your life. Thompson traveled all over the place and each place had a huge impact on his life. His whole life could have been different if he had lived elsewhere. For example if he stayed in L.A who knows if he would have ended up getting involved in gangs or even been killed like some of his family members. Then again if he hadn't lived in Bombay would he ever have found that motivation to work hard. He didn't think so. His area even had an impact on him being recruited, because not many people thought to recruit a kid from Bombay. The area you live in really can have a huge role in who you become. Fortunately Thompson was able to use his experience to change his life and even his families future for the better. Such an amazing story and it is all due to where a person lived. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:13 AM

This is such an inspiring story, and it's crazy to think that everything he has become is due to where he grew up. If this man had not gone to Bombay Beach his life would be very different. He probably would have gotten involved with gangs and never seen his full potential. Attending high school in such a remote area encouraged him to better his life so he could get out of there. Being bored all the time, he became a workout fiend and his father made him become a better student. Being from such a remote area also intrigued the Minnesota college scout. The choices Cedric made in his life as to where he would live, whether in Bombay Beach or the Minnesota college campus have drastically changed his life forever. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:20 AM
Cedric wanted more for himself and his life. He commuted hours away from home in order to stay away from the gangs and violence that surrounded him back home. So he endured the long travel inorder to better his life. He also was an exceptional football player. He felt he had no choice and it pushed him even harder because he wanted an out from that life he had at home. He wanted better for him and his family.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole

2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
A 150-yard-long chunk of State Highway 89 collapsed about 5 a.m. roughly 25 miles south of Page

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Louis Culotta's comment, February 21, 2013 2:49 PM
it looks like some of the pictures of the roads I took after the earthquake in new Zealand .
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:28 AM
A 150 yard piece of highway 89 had collapsed at 5 am. Two cars were traveling on the highway at the time. They have called scientists and geologists to the site where it happened so they can explain exactly what happened. The video is crazy of the road collapsed it literally dropped about six+ feet.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:14 PM

I am curious to see what the geologists reasoning for this to happen.  when I drive I assuming the roads I take are safe but this goes to show you you never know what will happen. And the news reporter said it was still going down. Glad everyone involved made it out safe. 

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gentrification in Providence

Gentrification in Providence | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it

KV: Development of a high end apartment complex in a low income area would force pre-gentrification people out of the neighborhood. The taxes would get raised to amounts that make it difficult for these people to afford. However, the people in charge of this project are ignoring the consequences and focusing on the 5 million dollars tax break. 

 

SD: This sign went up in to 2006 protest the mills-to-condo developments in Providence, Rhode Island.  Click here to see the photographer's work. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:41 AM
Gentrification has both positive and negative affects on the city. I believe that it is beneficial for a city to take older buildings and utilize them or flip them into malls or financially beneficial businesses for their economy. But on the other hand you are taking people who were living in these areas with low rent and after you flip these buildings the rent is going to rise substancially. Therefore these former residents cannot afford to stay in the apartments and have to relocate their homes. Its hard to pick a side.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:00 AM

This is basically a publicity stunt. When someone puts a specific cover on a magazine, they are looking for a certain kind of attention. Yes, this woman has faced some hardships in her life but not the brutal and intense things that this magazine may have stirred up.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 3:49 PM

The image of the Afghan Girl is easily recognizable and greatly popular, even to those born after it was made the cover of an issue of National Geographic.   It is mind boggling that the Afghan Girl had no idea she was on the cover of one the most notable publications of our time.  It is disheartening that they sought to find her so long after the fact.  I can only imagine how much money that image drew in, and how little she received for being the muse.  The image now is still just as powerful, if not even more powerful.  Her experiences have taken their toll and it is evident.  Her eyes still are haunting, this time less with beauty and more with hardship.  The photos of her show that images can sometimes convey emotions and meaning far more than words ever could.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 1:17 PM

This is an iconic image that we have all seen.In 1984 a picture of a young Afghan refugee was taken and in June 1985 it was placed on the cover of National Geographic Magazine. 17 years later in 2002 the young woman was tracked down.During this visit a recent image was captured (the first and last time she was photographer was that day in 1984). Her name is Sharbat Gula and she never knew the impact her photo had made. So cutoff from the modern world void of most of her identity she did not even know how old she was.When the photo was taken she was in a refugee camp ,along with the remnants of her family that had survived the Afghan war.In 2002 when a search was assembled to find the woman with the piercing green eyes , the National Geographic organization did not know if she was still alive.After passing around her photo they were able to locate Sharbat .Reluctant to be caught talking to foreigners and uneasy about taking another photo National Geographic explained to the woman how she had inspired people to help her country. Having considered that she was  helping her people Sharbat agreed. National Geographic also helped to provide her family with much needed healthcare.

Scooped by megan b clement
Scoop.it!

Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
The world's biggest vessel takes to the water for the first time in South Korea.
more...
megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 10:24 AM
"This article talks about how important shipping has become in our economy. Now South Korea has developed a ship the largest ever, weighing 600,000 tons, and is the length of the empire state building. It is also able to withstand horrible weather. It will be part of natural gas production too. Now Korea has already begun trying to make a larger vessel. Shipping with ships is cheaper travel and that means cheaper costs to manufacture goods. Now you can see why Korea has become innovative with designing the size vessels they have.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Maldives

Maldives | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon‘s insight: The Maldives is a small country in the Indian Ocean composed of 1,200 islands.  Virtually every spot in this country is under 8 feet in elevation.  Pictured above is the capital of Malé, which has the largest...

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:48 AM
A maldive is a country that is made up of 1200 islands.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:38 PM

I found this video disturbing.  Maybe because we have train safety taught to us were they stress that you need to stay away from the tracks, here the people are sitting next to a train track and even have goods for sale that the train drives over.  I think it is interesting how they reclaim the space but the mom in me worries about kids getting run over by the train.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 6:04 PM

I love this video. Never think that the "third world" is not more dynamic and innovative than the first!

Jeffrey Ing's curator insight, August 13, 5:12 AM

people are not giving up with inflated price of urban land. They adapt and live with it :)

 

Rescooped by megan b clement from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Geography Class Topics | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, water, China, Japan, East Asia.


Via Seth Dixon
megan b clement's insight:

" Asia is willing to go to war with small islands in order to gain full control and rights of the ocean borders. China is very assertive and aggressive. They even go to the extreme as to use boats to hit Vietnamese and Phillipino ships to show that the ocean is theirs. It is all because countries or islands with a coastline are to have rights over their land and 200 nautical miles as well. It is just becoming a problem because how do you evenly distribute or differentiate who's is who's."

more...
Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 21, 2013 8:41 AM

This is a great example of geopolitics and territorial disputes over small pieces of land that seem insignificant yet could result in armed conflict over who controls them and their surrounding waters.  In one case, you will see that apparently WWII isn't even over!

Catherine Shabo's curator insight, April 21, 2013 9:32 PM

There is a big lesson to be learned from this map and what it means. No territory on this earth is completely not valuable. Specifically ones with long coast lines and natural resources. This shows how Geography comes into play with economic profit. Now, if this division is not working for the East Pacific then the ideal thing would be to divide it equally. But, that never works does it..

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.