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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Population Reference Bureau

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Population Reference Bureau | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

The 2013 World Population Data Sheet lists all geopolitical entities with populations of 150,000 or more and all members of the UN. These include sovereign states, dependencies, overseas departments, and some territories whose status or boundaries may be undetermined or in dispute.

 

More developed regions, following the UN classification, comprise all of Europe and North America, plus Australia, Japan, and New Zealand.

 

All other regions and countries are classified as less developed.

 

The least developed countries consist of 49 countries with especially low incomes, high economic vulnerability, and poor human development indicators; 34 of these countries are in sub-Saharan Africa, 14 in Asia, and one in the Caribbean.

 

The criteria and list of countries, as defined by the United Nations, can be found at http://www.unohrlls.org/en/ldc/25/. ;

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Seth Dixon, Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

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Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Hindu New Year – The Different New Year Dates in Hinduism

Hindu New Year – The Different New Year Dates in Hinduism | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
When is the Hindu New Year? Or when is the New Year in Hindu Religion? There is no single answer to this question. The numerous cultures...

Via Harish Rajpal
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

Explains how many don't know that there is a hindu new year after Jan. 1st and marks the first day of a new year on the hindu calendar. 

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Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study

Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
In a nation of 230 million people, 700 languages and some 300 ethnicities, ethnic Chinese are one of Indonesia’s historic minorities.

 

Religion and ethnicity are often connected, but not always.  This case study of such a group, the Chinese Muslims of Indonesia, provide an interesting glimpse into the economic, historic and political patterns of these cultural groups that are parts of communal identities.  


Via Seth Dixon, Brian Caldwell, WalkerKyleForrest
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

Pie charts to display ethnicity, religion, and population across the world,

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WalkerKyleForrest's curator insight, April 8, 2014 9:42 AM

This article explains the connection between someones ethnicity and someones religion. This connection may not always be as closely linked as youd think. FORREST

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 1:26 PM

This is a very unusual circumstance.  The Chinese were originally immigrants to Indonesia.  Then they were regarded as higher on the social status than native Indonesians under Dutch rule.  And eventually when Indonesia got its independence, assimilation was forced on the Chinese.  This is a clear case of racism and religion-forcing at its finest.

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Slideshare: Middle east flags

 Looking for an easy online method of sharing and using powerpoint presentations?  Slideshare is made just for that.  Here is one I made of Middle Eastern flags a while back, showing the cultural patterns and similarities among the flags.  Students are quick to note that the Israeli flag sticks out and "doesn't fit in well visually."  


Via Seth Dixon, Steve Perkins
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

Representation of middle eastern flags,

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 24, 2013 9:51 PM

These flags have a lot in common: I know at least from my own background that green is the color of Islam (in fact, I studied a Newsweek cover about the new "Green Scare" comparing Green/Islam to Red/Communism in the minds of Americans). Each flag is also beautifully geometric, keeping in line with the  inheritance of Islamic art. Of course the US Coalition would design such an ignorant flag for Iraq- we basically thought it was ours in 2004. Quick in, quick out, everyone wins. As we know today that is not the case....

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:11 PM

Many of these countries share similar backgrounds and cultures, as well as flags which is seen above.  The color patterns show red, black,  white, and green on almost every flag except Israel's which is blue and white.  It shows that most of the countries within the region are all linked somehow whether it be through language, identity, or other reasons, though there is still room for conflict and change as time passes.  After looking at flags from other countries such as Iraq and Iran, the graphics on them change, sometimes reflecting government changes.  It is sometimes difficult to remember and notice so many flags, yet some of these flags have changed within the last 2 to 3 decades to accompany the change of government.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:06 PM

This goes to show how a flag is supposed to represent the people who live in their country. And the flag of Israel really does stick out like a sore thumb. We have the crescent moon, the typical Arabic colors of green, red, black, and white, and the blue and white really doesn't have much to do with the history of the people who live in Israel, only the new Jewish community who live there, but not the Palestinians. 

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Fabrics, colors and patterns are infused with cultural meaning - Waterloo Cedar Falls Courier

Fabrics, colors and patterns are infused with cultural meaning - Waterloo Cedar Falls Courier | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

Fabrics, colors and patterns are infused with cultural meaningWaterloo Cedar Falls CourierShe did research on Native American star quilts on the Fort Peck Sioux and Assiniboine Reservation in northeastern Montana for her master's thesiis in...


Via ramblejamble
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Represents the cultural patterns for Native Americans 

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Infographic: Using 2 Million Instagram Pics to Map a City's Visual Signature | Wired Design | Wired.com

Infographic: Using 2 Million Instagram Pics to Map a City's Visual Signature | Wired Design | Wired.com | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
How can Instagram data visualize the cultural patterns and trends of a city?

Via Alessandro Rea
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

Shows how they can use Instagram pictures from cities and make photo trails across the world to depict global cultural patterns. 

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Rescooped by Lona Pradeep Parad from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments

Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
As a graduate student I wrote my dissertation on the meanings within the symbolic landscape.  Since very few are clamoring to read my 500 page dissertation, this is a sampling that shows one of my ...

 

I didn't intend for this to be the weekend of statue resources, but the Joe Paterno controversy (for more opinions on that see: http://geographyeducation.org/2012/07/13/the-joe-paterno-statue-on-penn-state-campus/ ) has me thinking of other controversial statues that I researched while in Mexico City.  I wrote an article in the Journal of Geography showing how you can teach cultural patterns and processes using contested monuments in the symbolic landscape.  Consider this site a supplemental resource to that article (with the original article, photos, videos and Google Earth files attached). 


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

Shows how cultural monuments and sculptures have the ability to teach and provide insight on cultural history and patterns. 

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Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."


Via Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

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ethanrobert's comment, September 16, 2013 4:24 PM
Robert wrote this comment btw.
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 12:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.

 

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This article shows how population distribution is uneven. 

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 11:14 PM

Apparently, 2% of Australia's population lives mostly away from the coast between Australia and the ocean. Even though many countries have people who mostly live closer to the coast rather than closer to the middle at any given country, Australia has one of the lowest percentages of people living away from the coast that separates its country and the ocean. The main reason why many people rather live near the coast of a country is obviously because it's closer to the water. People rather live near the coast for fishing activities, farming and accessing to world trade. Also as you can see, most of the eastern part of Australia has many people that live in Australia. In that case, there are many tourists from Oceanic islands that visit the east side of Australia seeing as Oceania is east of Australia. Lastly, the middle/yellow area of Australia contains many desert areas and open grasslands so people would barely be able to live in that region.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 28, 5:49 PM

This seems to look like how many countries in the world are settled, with high populations in certain locations of a country along a coast line.  Its obvious here in Austrailia that there is a low population in the Outback since it can be very hot in this desert area and not a lot of vegitation or rainfall for agriculture.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, May 4, 10:59 PM

After looking at the pictures from Buzzfeed, I can totally understand why people don't live in too many places in Australia.  The snakes alone are enough to make me never even want to visit.  Australians have to watch their backs every time they leave the house.  That is not something that float my boat.  Also, even if there aren't enough reptiles to get you grossed out, the hail could kill ya!

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

A little overview of Malthus's theory on population. 

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This is just a clarification that the world population will continue to grow bigger and bigger, and along with that UN projects will increase. 

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Roman M's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Robert Hardy Simpkins's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:29 AM

The fact that in just 86 years we will have 15 billion people in our world is a very scary thought.will we have enough resources to account for all the people on Earth. Will there be multiple diseases killing people off. Our population needs to be controlled.

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


Via Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This video proves how population pyramids can predict the current and future state of a country such as Rwanda.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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How can one call to the religion of Allah?

How can one call to the religion of Allah? | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

To communicate Islamic morals and good conduct to people is a command of Allah: Let there be a community among you who call to the good, and enjoin the right, and forbid the wrong. They are the ones who have success. (Surah Al ‘Imran, 104) In one verse Allah commands us to “Call to t... http://islamicquestions.net/can-one-call-religion-allah/


Via Islamic Questions
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

Explains Islam in a short article and the meaning of their morals and conducts. 

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The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire

The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
How Facebook connections mirror old empires EIGHT years ago Facebook launched as an online social network connecting a small college community from a dorm room at Harvard University.

 

These graphics show how in a post-colonial world, former colonies are still socially intertwined in a cultural network that mirrors the empires of yesteryear. Why are these modern social networks so similar to imperial patterns? What economic explanations are there for these patterns? What is the cultural impact?


Via Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

How fb has made physical distance obsolete, connecting cultures to different cultures on a global scale.

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Rescooped by Lona Pradeep Parad from Women, Sexuality and Equality
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The Difference Between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation

The Difference Between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
Where do we draw the line between "appropriate" forms of cultural exchange and more damaging patterns of cultural appropriation?

Via Andrea Fernandes
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Explains different ways of adapting and exchanging culture to others.

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"Weaving language and culture together : the process of culture ...

The findings suggest that as the instructor and the students interact in the language classroom, it is not so much the particular pieces of cultural and linguistic information under discussion that delineate the actual culture learning process, but...

Via Holly Dilatush
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Discusses how language and culture go hand in hand.

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Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes: SETTLEMENT PATTERNS OF EARLY CALIFORNIANS

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes: SETTLEMENT PATTERNS OF EARLY CALIFORNIANS | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

California’s rich diversity of Native American ethnic-and-language groups took shape during the past 12,000 years as migrating tribes settled first on the lush Pacific coast and then in progressively drier, less-vegetated habitats, says a new University of Utah study.


Via David Connolly, Kyle Kampe, Jason Wilhelm
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This article discusses the patterns of culture in Cali, beginning from over 12,000 years ago.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 9:33 PM

Timeline of California's demographic development and patterns of occupation

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, September 5, 2013 11:35 AM

This article shows how human settlement patterns have changed over  time in California. We can see here that the culture of the native groups has changed over time due to their change in location which led to different resources, and eventually to changes in their overall civilizations. The article helps illustrate this idea through a map that shows where the groups have settled, so we can see what resources and changes in culture would have occurred over time. 

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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


Via Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are? 

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Unit 2: Population and Migration, Countries with the Most Migrants

Unit 2: Population and Migration, Countries with the Most Migrants | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.

 

Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  

 

Great site for students to look at the distribution of global population phenomena in map, list and graphic form

 

Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon, Greenroom Dweller, Lauren Sellers
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list? 

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No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe

No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
Birthrates across the Continent are falling at drastic and, to many, alarming rates. Why are Europeans so hesitant to have children, and what does it mean for their future and for ours?

 

Nice piece that show work well for understanding the demographic transition, which links population growth rates with levels of human development.


Via Kevin Suess, Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This is showing how in the future due to more woman's rights and better  education systems, woman are losing interest in having babies at an early age. Therefore the population in Europe is declining. 

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:11 PM

Unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:06 AM

11 billion people projection for the future but a decline in population in Europe? How? What factors altered this? Why? 

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 4:36 PM

This article discusses the population decrease in Southern Italy. The small city called Laviano is now deserted because of the extremely low birth rate. Rocco Falivena, the major, says that he proposed a system to get women to produce more babies. Pregnant women will receive 10,000 euros over the years if they produce a baby. Even with this system the population remains to be decreasing. 


The dramatic decrease of this small city will have huge economic consequences. This city is an example of the opposite that is happening globally and proves that the world needs a stable population and not a population decline. 

Rescooped by Lona Pradeep Parad from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Population Reference Bureau

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Population Reference Bureau | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it

The 2013 World Population Data Sheet lists all geopolitical entities with populations of 150,000 or more and all members of the UN. These include sovereign states, dependencies, overseas departments, and some territories whose status or boundaries may be undetermined or in dispute.

 

More developed regions, following the UN classification, comprise all of Europe and North America, plus Australia, Japan, and New Zealand.

 

All other regions and countries are classified as less developed.

 

The least developed countries consist of 49 countries with especially low incomes, high economic vulnerability, and poor human development indicators; 34 of these countries are in sub-Saharan Africa, 14 in Asia, and one in the Caribbean.

 

The criteria and list of countries, as defined by the United Nations, can be found at http://www.unohrlls.org/en/ldc/25/. ;

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Seth Dixon, Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

more...
Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Global and National Population Pyramids

Global and National Population Pyramids | Population & cultural patterns and processes | Scoop.it
Interactive Visualization of the Population Pyramids of the World from 1950 to 2050...

 


Via Seth Dixon
Lona Pradeep Parad's insight:

This article depicts how the pyramid and demographic transition model coincide.

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MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

If you struggle with population structure - this visualisation may be useful. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 11:09 PM

This website allows the user to look into the past, and into the future of population all over the world. The population pyramids show the distribution between young and elder people. It is very interesting to see how the pyramid is able to show the predicted population pyramid of the future as well. 

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 6:39 PM

Access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation - Population pyramids show population of different ages from each gender in a certain country. From population pyramids, you can conclude a country's development level. For example, if there is an equal population of all ages, this means that they have amazing health care, great education to educate women about birth control towards population, and good sanitation. From all of this information, you can tell how developed a country may be and perhaps also whether the country has many cities And urbanization.