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An unusual snail named Jeremy finally found a mate. Now he is stuck in a love triangle.

An unusual snail named Jeremy finally found a mate. Now he is stuck in a love triangle. | Popular Science | Scoop.it
The genetically mutated snail's two potential mates took a liking to each other, and now have produced about 170 eggs between them.
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Glyphosate: WHO cancer agency edited out

Glyphosate: WHO cancer agency edited out | Popular Science | Scoop.it
When the International Agency for Research on Cancer reviewed weedkiller glyphosate, significant changes happened between a draft report and the final version.
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Mother's Negligence Suit Against Quest's Athena Could Broadly Impact Genetic Testing Labs

Mother's Negligence Suit Against Quest's Athena Could Broadly Impact Genetic Testing Labs | Popular Science | Scoop.it
The tragic case exposes critical gaps in how testing firms currently interpret, classify, and report variants, according to genomics experts.
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Rice so nice it was domesticated thrice

Rice so nice it was domesticated thrice | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Amazonian variety apparently died off after European colonization
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Back to the Roots 's curator insight, October 17, 5:37 AM
Really interesting! Three independent domestication events on the same staple, amazing...
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New study shows that groundnut immunity to aflatoxin could be within reach thanks to a double-defence approach

New study shows that groundnut immunity to aflatoxin could be within reach thanks to a double-defence approach | Popular Science | Scoop.it
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Scientists Genetically Engineered Moss to Smell Like Patchouli and It's Amazing

Scientists Genetically Engineered Moss to Smell Like Patchouli and It's Amazing | Popular Science | Scoop.it
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To better grok how all 37 trillion human cells work, we need new tools – Ars Technica

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Research suggests students are biased against female lecturers

Research suggests students are biased against female lecturers | Popular Science | Scoop.it
SEXISM is among the prime suspects for the scarcity of female professors. Yet proving that bias against women is widespread in academia—or even exists at all—is tricky. But a forthcoming paper in the Journal of the European Economic Association rises to the task.
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After 20 Years, A Drug That Silences Genes Succeeds

After 20 Years, A Drug That Silences Genes Succeeds | Popular Science | Scoop.it
A 1998 laboratory breakthrough that upended scientists’ understanding of how genes work finally looks set to yield a new treatment for a rare hereditary disorder – and maybe a whole new type of drug.
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The Week My Husband Left And My House Was Burgled I Secured A Grant To Begin The Project That Became BRCA1

The Week My Husband Left And My House Was Burgled I Secured A Grant To Begin The Project That Became BRCA1 | Popular Science | Scoop.it
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Zika virus used to treat aggressive brain cancer - BBC News

Zika virus used to treat aggressive brain cancer - BBC News | Popular Science | Scoop.it
The infection kills off cancerous cells and leaves healthy ones unharmed, animal studies show.
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This Nasty Medieval Remedy Kills MRSA

This Nasty Medieval Remedy Kills MRSA | Popular Science | Scoop.it

An ancient brew could lead to modern-day drugs to fight the superbug
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Origins of food crops connect countries worldwide

Origins of food crops connect countries worldwide | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Research into the origins of food plants has led to the recognition that specific geographical regions around the world have been of particular importance to the development of agricultural crops. Yet the relative contributions of these different regions in the context of current food systems have not been quantified. Here we determine the origins (‘primary regions of diversity’) of the crops comprising the food supplies and agricultural production of countries worldwide. We estimate the degree to which countries use crops from regions of diversity other than their own (‘foreign crops’), and quantify changes in this usage over the past 50 years. Countries are highly interconnected with regard to primary regions of diversity of the crops they cultivate and/or consume. Foreign crops are extensively used in food supplies (68.7% of national food supplies as a global mean are derived from foreign crops) and production systems (69.3% of crops grown are foreign). Foreign crop usage has increased significantly over the past 50 years, including in countries with high indigenous crop diversity. The results provide a novel perspective on the ongoing globalization of food systems worldwide, and bolster evidence for the importance of international collaboration on genetic resource conservation and exchange.
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Did blind cavefish evolve by breaking the laws of evolution?

Did blind cavefish evolve by breaking the laws of evolution? | Popular Science | Scoop.it
The discovery that a cavefish lost its sight because key eye genes were switched off via epigenetics, rather than mutation, will fuel an evolutionary debate
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How the durian got its sulfuric stench

How the durian got its sulfuric stench | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Fruit’s genome sequence has sulfur-related genes, which probably evolved to attract elephants and bats.
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Inside the Strange Science of the Fake Meat That 'Bleeds'

Inside the Strange Science of the Fake Meat That 'Bleeds' | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Join WIRED for the deepest dive yet into the science of the Impossible Burger, the genetically engineered fake meat on a mission to upend the beef industry.
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Celiac Sufferers May Soon Have Better Bread Options Thanks to Genetically Modified Wheat

Celiac Sufferers May Soon Have Better Bread Options Thanks to Genetically Modified Wheat | Popular Science | Scoop.it

Researchers successfully removed 90 percent of the genes that code for the gluten proteins that trigger adverse symptoms
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Mystery of what wiped out the Tasmanian tiger 'finally solved'

Mystery of what wiped out the Tasmanian tiger 'finally solved' | Popular Science | Scoop.it
Scientists believe they have finally solved the mysterious disappearance of the Tasmanian tiger from the Australian mainland, concluding that the extinction was due to extreme weather and drought rather than wild dogs or hunting by Aborigines.
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How African Knowledge Helped Shape the New World

How African Knowledge Helped Shape the New World | Popular Science | Scoop.it
African rice new world - Did slaves contribute more than solely their labor to the success of African rice plantations in the New World?
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Sexual deception in orchids | OUPblog

Sexual deception in orchids | OUPblog | Popular Science | Scoop.it
“In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love” (Alfred, Lord Tennyson), but he could have said the same for insects too. Male insects will be following the scent of females, looking for a partner, but not every female is what she seems to be. It might look like the orchid is getting some unwanted attention in the video below, but it’s actually the bee that’s the victim. The orchid has released complex scents to fool the bee into thinking it’s meeting a female.
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Weird fish fossil changes the story of how we moved onto land | New Scientist

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