Pompeii & Herculaneum
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Italian bureaucracy threatens Pompeii

Italian bureaucracy threatens Pompeii | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it

Conservationists warn the city is dangerously exposed to the elements, and is poorly served by red tape, lack of strategic planning and limited personnel of the site’s troubled management.

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Wall at Pompeii collapses after heavy rain

Wall at Pompeii collapses after heavy rain | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it
A Roman wall at Pompeii in southern Italy has collapsed, local archaeologists say, in the latest in a series of accidents at the ancient city buried by a volcanic explosion 2 000 years ago.

 

The section of wall some two metres (seven feet)long was part of the ruins of a house at the sprawling site near Naples. The area has seen heavy rain in recent weeks, and previous collapses have been linked to bad weather.

 

The local archaeological authority said in a statement that the announcement of a tender for the long-delayed conservation project was "imminent".


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Pompeii: The Mystery Of People Frozen In Time - History Documentary

Pompeii: The Mystery Of People Frozen In Time - History Documentary In a one off landmark drama documentary for BBC One, Dr Margaret Mountford presents Pompe...

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Elyzia Menounos's curator insight, August 20, 2013 9:36 PM

i love documentaries!!

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Ancient Graffiti At Pompei: Early Wall Posts And Political Slogans

Ancient Graffiti At Pompei: Early Wall Posts And Political Slogans | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it

A study conducted on the graffiti found on Pompeii’s walls reveals it was an early form of political campaigning and social networking.
The Ancient Roman city was covered in ash when Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79AD. Much of the graffiti on the ancient city’s walls is preserved in remarkable detail.
Research conducted by archaeologist Eeva-Maria Viitanen, a post-doctoral researcher at Finland’s University of Helsinki, shows that Pompeii homeowners had some control over who scrawled on the walls of their houses. Speaking at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle, she explained that graffiti was scratched into the stucco walls, written with charcoal, or in many cases even created by professional painters hired for political campaigns.
Viitanen is a project manager and co-ordinator for the Pompeii Project of the University of Helsinki. She examined more than 1,000 political messages found on walls in three areas of Pompeii.
She discovered that in 40% of cases, political adverts were placed on the walls of the homes belonging to the wealthy, which is notable given their homes were outnumbered by shops, bars and the dwellings inhabited by the city’s poor. Viitanen hazarded a guess why, saying: “Bars were probably more populated, but could their customers read and would they vote?”
Viitanen suggested the rich Ancient Romans were happy to allow their lavish homes to be used as prime advertising space for political slogans aimed at drumming up votes for political candidates during electoral campaigns. Such permission may have even signalled an endorsement. Viitanen told the journal ‘LiveScience’: “The facades of the private houses and even the street walks in front of them were controlled and maintained by the owner of the house, and in that respect, the idea that the wall space could be appropriated by anyone who wanted to do it seems unlikely.”
The archaeologist found that the majority of political ads are in areas that were likely to get most traffic, and consequently guaranteed exposure and targeted an audience. She told ‘Live Science’ that the slogans were simple, perhaps saying that a named candidate was “worthy of public office” or “a good man”. However, in a nod to early spin and the bella figura, she revealed that one candidate boasted of his ability to bake bread.
The political slogans are not the only type of graffiti found in Pompeii. The Ancient Roman citizens scribbled thousands of messages on the city’s walls, including literary quotes and greetings to friends, suggesting there was a thriving form of social networking centuries before Facebook was invented.


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Andrew Hernandez's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:17 PM

the link to the site is broken, but the info is written on here

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Italy promises UNESCO it will not abandon Pompeii - Art Daily

Italy promises UNESCO it will not abandon Pompeii - Art Daily | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it
Italy's culture minister assured UNESCO on Sunday that efforts were being made to restore the long-neglected Roman city of Pompeii, after the United N.

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Pompeii, Italy The city of Pompeii is a partially buried Roman town near modern day Naples.

The city of Pompeii is a partially buried Roman town-city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Alo...
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Restoration starts at crumbling ancient city of Pompeii

Restoration starts at crumbling ancient city of Pompeii | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it
ROME -- Conservation work at the crumbling ancient Roman city of Pompeii began Wednesday, a day after police announced a corruption probe into previous restoration work at the site.

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David Connolly's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:14 AM

Corruption and conservation...  a heady mix!

Evie Masterton's curator insight, August 20, 2013 9:23 PM
hey liv nice scoop!
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International Competition Calls For Ideas To Revitalise Pompeii

International Competition Calls For Ideas To Revitalise Pompeii | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it

The Italian government and the town of Pompeii have launched an international competition in an effort to develop the town’s tourism attractions.

Called ‘99 Ideas Call for Pompeii’, the competition is being promoted by the Minister for Territorial Cohesion Fabrizio Barca, the Minister for Cultural Heritage and Affairs Lorenzo Ornaghi and the Municipality of Pompeii. Its goal is to develop Pompeii by building on its two major attractions: the archaeological site and Shrine of the Virgin of the Rosary of Pompeii dedicated to Our Lady of the Rosary that has become a point of pilgrimage. Competition entrants are requested to submit proposals on realising the potential of the two attractions and their possible synergies with other local assets with the aim of rendering the town more attractive, welcoming and visible, and increasing the competitiveness of the local tourism and heritage industry.

Proposals can cover various themes including how to extend visitors’ stay by identifying additional attractions, promoting initiatives concerning attractions; developing local traditions such as handicrafts, improving the level of quality of service and infrastructure for visitors, developing the adjacent areas and providing services to the two major attractions, and promoting initiatives to secure the participation of citizens in the governance process and planning of projects.

The competition is open to interested parties such as professionals, academics and stakeholders acting individually or in association from Italy or abroad. It remains open until 15 April. Entrants can submit ideas at the www.99ideas.it website.


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Restoration starts at crumbling ancient city of Pompeii

Restoration starts at crumbling ancient city of Pompeii | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it
ROME -- Conservation work at the crumbling ancient Roman city of Pompeii began Wednesday, a day after police announced a corruption probe into previous restoration work at the site.

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David Connolly's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:14 AM

Corruption and conservation...  a heady mix!

Evie Masterton's curator insight, August 20, 2013 9:23 PM
hey liv nice scoop!
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Herculaneum’s Ruins Are Revived by Philanthropy

Herculaneum’s Ruins Are Revived by Philanthropy | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it
Herculaneum, despite having Pompeii as its neighbor, has become a textbook case of successful archaeological conservation.

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Italy promises UNESCO it will not abandon Pompeii - Art Daily

Italy promises UNESCO it will not abandon Pompeii - Art Daily | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it
Italy's culture minister assured UNESCO on Sunday that efforts were being made to restore the long-neglected Roman city of Pompeii, after the United N.

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Pompeii Is Crumbling—Can It Be Saved?

Pompeii Is Crumbling—Can It Be Saved? | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it
Collapses highlight "critical" situation, but site is "absolutely safe for tourists."

Last month, part of a major wall came tumbling down in Pompeii, the ancient Roman city frozen in time by a f...

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The mafia left Naples in ruins. Can they do the same to Pompeii?

The mafia left Naples in ruins. Can they do the same to Pompeii? | Pompeii & Herculaneum | Scoop.it

Having been buried under ash from Mount Vesuvius almost 2000 years ago, the Roman city of Pompeii managed to rise again – becoming one of the world’s most famous historic sites and tourist attractions.

But over the past decade – under the weight of 2.3 million trampling visitors’ feet every year – it has fallen into woeful neglect and is in urgent need of restoration.

This was amply demonstrated in 2010 with the collapse of the site’s House of the Gladiators.

 


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David Connolly's curator insight, April 22, 2013 4:23 PM

not a good look