Pollution in US a...
Follow
Find
31 views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Jack Sytsma
onto Pollution in US and Canada
Scoop.it!

Mine metals at Maine Superfund site causing widespread contamination

Mine metals at Maine Superfund site causing widespread contamination | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it
Toxic metals from the only open pit mine in an estuary system in the United States are widespread in nearby sediment, water and fish and may be affecting marine and coastal animals that feed on them beyond the mine site, a new study finds.
Jack Sytsma's insight:

Reasearchers have found metals dug in a mine in maine.. in a river. They have stated that the some of the main ingredients found in the river include zinc, lead, and copper. The metals are contaminating the marine life in the river and they is leading them to get sick and die. Reaseachers also state that anyone who injests the fish or water from that river have a risk for being infected. I think that mining companies should take time to make sure that the chemicals they are using or even the metals they mine aren't harmful to wildlife. I think also, if the big companies such as BP would've taken a little more time for safety, the oil spill would not have happened, or would not have been so bad. That goes for this company too- they should have hired a professional to check on the chemicals in the mine or been smart enough to not mine next to a freshwater river used for fishing. 

more...
Aletta Verhey's curator insight, September 25, 2013 12:29 PM

Toxic metals from an open pit mine in the U.S. is spreading in nearby sediments. The water and fish could be affecting other marine and coastal animals. Human health and aquatics are both affected by the mine's contamination. People have found elevated levels of copper, zinc, cadmium and lead in the sediment, water and killfish. The killfish are bait for larger animals, but are found to be contaminated with toxic metals. 

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jack Sytsma from Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Mineral Surfaces & Nanogeoscience
Scoop.it!

Lake Sediments Record Prehistoric Lead Pollution Related to Early Copper Production in North America

Lake Sediments Record Prehistoric Lead Pollution Related to Early Copper Production in North America | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it

Via Ath Godelitsas
Jack Sytsma's insight:

A sedement found in a michigan pennensula is found to have traces of lead, copper, titanium, and organic materials. This means that back 7000 years ago, native americans must have mined in the Michigan area and found copper and other valueable materials. But this also goes to show you how early lead and copper pollution has been introduced to the world that many years ago. Lead concentrations are found in three of the Great Lakes, which means that the fish swimming in those lakes will end out dying of lead poisoning. I think the government should take more action in things like this. Even though it wasn't completely caused by the present or even by us americans, we should still try to perserve what little life we have left on our country. The pollution will spread to other areas by the means of rivers flowing out of the lakes.. and to follow that.. more pollution. 

more...
Ath Godelitsas's curator insight, June 4, 2013 2:12 PM

Lead pollution from prehistoric copper mining in N. America can be detected in lake sediments from 8,000 to 5,000 years ago.

Rescooped by Jack Sytsma from Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan
Scoop.it!

Fish deformities linked to oil pollution in U.S. and Alberta - Canada - CBC News

Fish deformities linked to oil pollution in U.S. and Alberta - Canada - CBC News | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it
A renowned Alberta water scientist is urging the federal government to take action after he discovered deformities in fish in the Athabasca River downriver from oil sands developments bear a striking resemblance to ones found in fish after spills...

Via Robert DesJarlait
Jack Sytsma's insight:

Deformities in fish are supposedly linked to the oil spill in Canada. After conducting some reasearch, a famous Alberta water scientist, Dr. Schindler, found disturbing evidence- the fish in the river he was conducting an expierament on had many deformities! He believes this is cause by an oil spill up north of the river where the fish were first found. Also, that it is VERY similar to the deformities found in fish after the big B.P. oil spill in the United States. I think that reasearch should be done on the fish, also, the companies should be put on trial. The fact that they had an oil spill and did very little to clean it up is enough, but affect the aquadic life in the area just makes it worse. Also, the fact that the fish show a lot of resemblence the fish in the B.P. oil spill just shows that this kind of stuff should not be taken likely. 

more...
Iloria Phoenix's comment, October 3, 2013 9:22 AM
I agree that the government needs to take on the situation and help prevent deformations in the fish. If they do not its sounds like there will be an ongoing negative situation for Canada
Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 7:52 PM
The government should step in to provide some funding, but not get in the way of groups that will actually be doing the clean ups. The deformities in fish will pass with time as the oil gets cleared up. The best way to solve the problem is get the oil filtered out, then worry about the fish.
Molly Kellar's comment, October 4, 2013 1:10 AM
I think that they should do something to clean up the oil spills. There are so many bad things that could happen and it could definitely effect the life in the water.
Rescooped by Jack Sytsma from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

Canadian power plant is buying up Detroit's pile of tar-sands waste, burning it | Grist.org

Canadian power plant is buying up Detroit's pile of tar-sands waste, burning it | Grist.org | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it

 

Residents of Detroit who’ve railed against the recent mushrooming of a three-story-high pile of petrochemical waste on their riverfront may be pleased to know that the petcoke is gradually being shipped back to Canada.

 

But while the news might be good for Detroiters, it’s not so good for Canadians — or anyone who cares about a livable climate. A Nova Scotia power plant is now burning the cheap, filthy fuel to produce electricity.

 

The petcoke is a byproduct of refining tar-sands oil, which began recently at a Detroit refinery. The pile’s growth over the past six months has disgusted residents and their elected leaders. Rep. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) introduced legislation in Congress that would direct the federal government to investigate the health and environmental impacts of the uncovered waste. A state lawmaker introduced a bill that would require such waste to be stored inside enclosed structures. And the Detroit City Council is mulling options [PDF] for dealing with the blight.

 

It’s difficult to legally burn petcoke for energy in the U.S. because of the pollution it creates, but power plants in other countries — like Canada, apparently — are happy to buy it up and burn it.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jack Sytsma's insight:

A company in Canada is burning up fuels for their factory and it is affecting the air that they breath. "Petcoke" is a byproduct of burning the oil and has negative effects on the life in Canada. Researchers say that people who breath this harmful gas, have a shorter life-expectancy than those that breath clean air. They also say that if the company is built in the U.S. then the effects can work it's way to major cities such as Sanfrancisco and Las Angles. I think the companies should have done more research on the effects of the byproduct on life. I also think that people should protest against the pollution spreading it's way to the United States. Any simple measure can effect a bunch of people. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jack Sytsma from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Study: Air Pollution Causes 200,000 Early Deaths in US

Study: Air Pollution Causes 200,000 Early Deaths in US | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it
Air pollution causes about 200,000 early deaths each year in the United States, according to a new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Researchers at MIT’s Laborator...

Via SustainOurEarth
Jack Sytsma's insight:

A study at the MIT (Massachuesetts Institute of Technology) showed that air pollution causes 200,000 early deaths in the United States. The pollution causes 53,000 premature deaths and 52,000 deaths because of electrical power generations. 130 out of every 100,000 deaths in the United States and Canada each year, and that rate is rising. The factories in the US and Canada release toxins intot the air, getting combined to create a toxic rain when mixed with the moisture in the air. Then raining down in the form of acid rain that pollutes the land and water we drink and rely on for daily life.  I believe that we should help save infant and childrens' lives by diminishing polution and thus making the earth more "green". If we could just change a few small things, the earth, and it's inhabbitants, would be better. 

more...
Colten goemaat's comment, September 27, 2013 12:27 PM
Wow I can't belive that I would hate to live there
Jazz VanHemert's comment, October 1, 2013 10:30 AM
This article should be very eye opening for everyone, especially people living in these dangerous cities! Many people are dying because of these chemicals. We need to find a way to stop this or else the death rates are going to keep rising.
Cameron Miller's comment, October 3, 2013 2:27 PM
This is insane! I was clueless that this was happening. This is a real eye opener to how much pollution impacts us. The cities create the most pollution and the people inside are getting most of that stuff in their lungs. We need to find a way to limit pollution in the air or this number will continue to rise.
Rescooped by Jack Sytsma from Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions
Scoop.it!

White House Undercuts Coal Power Plant Water Pollution Rule

White House Undercuts Coal Power Plant Water Pollution Rule | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON, DC, July 24, 2013 (ENS) - Coal-fired power plants, many operating with expired permits, have become the largest source of toxic water pollution in the United States, finds new research released Tuesday by a coalition of environmental...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Jack Sytsma's insight:

 A study by the EPA shows that 251 power plants dump wastewater or "scrubwater" into the rivers used for fishing, swimming, and after a few turns through the treatment plant, drinking. The survey also found that 71 of these companies have denied ever dumping harmful chemicals into the rivers and bays. Also, it says that some companies operate with a licence that expired 5 YEARS AGO.  Coal-powered plants operating the U.S. have become the largest contributer to toxic water pollution. The white house funded the research and stopped giving funds to the companies until they renew their permits/ licences. I think that it's insane that a person could think that A. it's safe to dump chemicals into drinking water and B. that they would do this without a licence to even think about doing anything! I think the companies should be shutdown because of the pollution hazards, but my guess is that they will be up-and-running by spring. 

more...
Aanna Roslien's comment, September 27, 2013 10:22 AM
I agree with you, I don't get how someone could think it would be okay to dump chemicals into things that we drink and use! The company should be shut down until something changes. This could have such a big impact on the world because we won't know what we could be drinking or using.
Jazz VanHemert's comment, October 1, 2013 10:25 AM
I think this is a very concerning article to people. It is very concerning because we don't know where exactly the chemicals are and that is very dangerous. These companies should have some kind of punishment for doing that.
Cameron Miller's comment, October 3, 2013 2:32 PM
I think this is awful, they dump chemicals into water we use for swimming, fishing, and other stuff like that. They need to be punished because this is just not right. It is disgusting to know this is going on.
Rescooped by Jack Sytsma from Keystone XL: Affairs of State
Scoop.it!

Sierra Club Report: Toxic Tar Sands: Profiles from the Front Lines

Sierra Club Report: Toxic Tar Sands: Profiles from the Front Lines | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it

"Most Americans have never heard of the Alberta tar sands, yet it is one of the largest and most destructive projects on Earth. This little-known industrial mega-project is creating an ongoing environmental disaster in Canada, and is now threatening to create one here in the United States.

 

Tar sands oil is mined from a black sticky substance called bitumen, found beneath the vast boreal forest in Alberta, Canada. To extract tar sands crude, oil companies clear-cut ancient forest, then strip mine the soil beneath it, using huge quantities of fresh water and natural gas to separate the oil from bitumen. The process leaves behind giant toxic lakes that are linked to abnormally high rates of cancer in neighboring communities and are large enough to be seen from space.

 

But it doesn't stop there. The oil industry is expanding facilities to process this toxic oil here in the United States through a network of refineries and pipelines. Public health in several states is under threat from dramatic increases in refining pollution, and massive pipelines are planned to cross the United States' largest freshwater aquifer, which supplies one-third of our nation's agriculture. Communities in Alberta have long been speaking out about the damage tar sands poses to their health through water and air pollution."


Via Dennis Richards
Jack Sytsma's insight:

Sand Tar in Alberta, Canada has been proven to have harmful effects on the life in the area. The oil companies first start by stripping the area of land of any trees or life in the area which they plan to mine. Then, the companies strip-mine the area for oil. When they are finished with that, they just leave the area and move on. It is also proven to cause cancer in the victims who breathe in the air. I think that if a oil causes can to just civilians 1. they should just not dig for it or 2. just dig somewhere away from life. I feel as though the companies just do good for themselves without thinking about the effects that it could have on life, polluting the area and just leaving it be. Also, they are planning on doing the same thing here in the United States which will only spread pollution further from Canada to the United States. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jack Sytsma from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

Biofuels cause pollution, not as green as thought | AlertNet

Biofuels cause pollution, not as green as thought | AlertNet | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it

Green schemes to fight climate change by producing more bio-fuels could actually worsen a little-known type of air pollution and cause almost 1,400 premature deaths a year in Europe by 2020, a study showed on Sunday.

 

The report said trees grown to produce wood fuel - seen as a cleaner alternative to oil and coal - released a chemical into the air that, when mixed with other pollutants, could also reduce farmers' crop yields.

 

"Growing biofuels is thought to be a good thing because it reduces the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere," said Nick Hewitt, who worked on the study with colleagues from England's Lancaster University.

 

"What we're saying is 'yes, that's great, but biofuels could also have a detrimental effect on air quality'," he added.

 

The report, in the journal Nature Climate Change, looked into the impact of a European Union scheme to slow climate change by producing more biofuels.

 

Hewitt told Reuters there would be a similar impact wherever biofuels were produced in large quantities in areas suffering air pollution, including the United States and China.

 

Poplar, willow or eucalyptus trees, all used as fast-growing sources of renewable wood fuel, emit high levels of the chemical isoprene as they grow, the study said. Isoprene forms toxic ozone when mixed with other air pollutants in sunlight.

 

"Large-scale production of biofuels in Europe would have small but significant effects on human mortality and crop yields," said Hewitt.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jack Sytsma's insight:

Biofuels are proven to be not as green as scientists first believed. The farms or land where the trees are grown to create these biofuels have been studied and the trees are releasing a gas that is harmful to the earth's ozone layer. Biofuels is a good idea, but is still in need of perfection. I think that it is a good concept, but scientist need to take the time to reasearch more of the effect of these fuels. I also think that companies that use the biofuels should do it in a secluded enviornment. They don't know enough, in fact, they were really just testing to see if the biofuels worked, and they did. But the shocking part is what came after. 

more...
Aletta Verhey's curator insight, September 23, 2013 1:49 PM

Biofuels are thought to be convenient for farmers because they're seen as a cleaner alternative to oil and coal. Biofuels are still needing to be perfected though. Farmers use biofuels to help the climate change so they don't release as much carbon dioxide. Nick Hewitt, who works with colleagues from England's Lancaster University, says that biofuels are great, but have a bad effect on air quality.

Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 7:55 PM
Biofuels are a great idea, but they are long from being at the level of safeness that they need to be in terms of pollution. They are usually used on farms and manufacturing plants, because they are believed to give off cleaner emissions, but this is not the case. The biofuels are actually hurting the ozone just as much, if not more, as other types of fuel.
Scooped by Jack Sytsma
Scoop.it!

Mine metals at Maine Superfund site causing widespread contamination

Mine metals at Maine Superfund site causing widespread contamination | Pollution in US and Canada | Scoop.it
Toxic metals from the only open pit mine in an estuary system in the United States are widespread in nearby sediment, water and fish and may be affecting marine and coastal animals that feed on them beyond the mine site, a new study finds.
Jack Sytsma's insight:

Reasearchers have found metals dug in a mine in maine.. in a river. They have stated that the some of the main ingredients found in the river include zinc, lead, and copper. The metals are contaminating the marine life in the river and they is leading them to get sick and die. Reaseachers also state that anyone who injests the fish or water from that river have a risk for being infected. I think that mining companies should take time to make sure that the chemicals they are using or even the metals they mine aren't harmful to wildlife. I think also, if the big companies such as BP would've taken a little more time for safety, the oil spill would not have happened, or would not have been so bad. That goes for this company too- they should have hired a professional to check on the chemicals in the mine or been smart enough to not mine next to a freshwater river used for fishing. 

more...
Aletta Verhey's curator insight, September 25, 2013 12:29 PM

Toxic metals from an open pit mine in the U.S. is spreading in nearby sediments. The water and fish could be affecting other marine and coastal animals. Human health and aquatics are both affected by the mine's contamination. People have found elevated levels of copper, zinc, cadmium and lead in the sediment, water and killfish. The killfish are bait for larger animals, but are found to be contaminated with toxic metals.