Politicality
328 views | +0 today
Follow
Politicality
All things political.
Curated by John Davis
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

10 Pro-Gun Myths, Shot Down

10 Pro-Gun Myths, Shot Down | Politicality | Scoop.it
Fact checking some of the gun lobby's favorite arguments shows they're full of holes.

Via Lynda Park
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Cartoon-Citizens-United-Pledge.jpg (850x757 pixels)

Cartoon-Citizens-United-Pledge.jpg (850x757 pixels) | Politicality | Scoop.it

Via Monica S Mcfeeters
more...
Coffee Party USA's curator insight, February 1, 2013 5:13 PM

They say an image says more than a thousand words and this one speaks volumes right down to the "Business Model" currently being pushed today in education,

 

Joseph Pomponio's comment, February 2, 2013 12:41 PM
I love it.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Voting Rights 2013: Augustine Carter

by Annabel Park, Story of America

Augustine Carter, an 85-year-old voter in Richmond, Virginia, tells her story of the trouble she went through to vote in 2012. Born in 1928, she never had a birth certificate and she never got a driver's license because she decided years ago that driving wasn't for her. Her baptism certificate was sufficient for all identification purposes until the 2012 election. She had to go through a Kafka-esque bureaucracy including being told by someone at the Motor Vehicle Administration that she couldn't prove that she was not a terrorist. [MORE]


Via Coffee Party USA
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party Science
Scoop.it!

Making the Case for a Government Hand in Research

Making the Case for a Government Hand in Research | Politicality | Scoop.it

At a time of looming budget cuts, advocates of government financing of technology research argue that it is an investment in the nation’s future.

 

by STEVE LOHR, New York Times

 

LUIS VON AHN, a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University, sold one Internet start-up to Google in 2009, and is now on to another. With the new company, Duolingo, he hopes to tap the millions of people learning languages online to create a crowdsourced engine of translation. “We want to translate the whole Web into every major language,” Mr. von Ahn says.

Enlarge This Image.

Ambitious, sure, but Duolingo recently attracted $15 million of venture capital. The investors are betting on Mr. von Ahn, his idea and his growing team of 18 engineers, language experts and Web designers.

 

Mr. von Ahn, 33, personifies some of the essential ingredients of America’s innovation culture, when it works well. An immigrant from Guatemala, he has intelligence and entrepreneurial energy to spare. And he has received a helping hand from the federal government. Duolingo began as a university research project financed by theNational Science Foundation.

 

That pattern has been repeated countless times over the years. Government support plays a vital role in incubating new ideas that are harvested by the private sector, sometimes many years later, creating companies and jobs. A report published this year by the National Research Council, a government advisory group, looked at eight computing technologies, including digital communications, databases, computer architectures and artificial intelligence, tracing government-financed research to commercialization. It calculated the portion of revenue at 30 well-known corporations that could be traced back to the seed research backed by government agencies. The total was nearly $500 billion a year.

 

“If you take any major information technology company today, from Google to Intel to Qualcomm to Apple to Microsoft and beyond, you can trace the core technologies to the rich synergy between federally funded universities and industry research and development,” says Peter Lee, a corporate vice president of Microsoft Research. Dr. Lee headed the National Research Council committee that produced the report, titled “Continuing Innovation in Information Technology.”

MORE: http://ow.ly/ehmA9  ;

 

 
Via Eric Byler
John Davis's insight:

add your insight...

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Middle Class and Standard of Living
Scoop.it!

Uncle Sam Prepares To Unleash Up To 30,000 Drones Over America For "Public Safety" | Zero Hedge

Uncle Sam Prepares To Unleash Up To 30,000 Drones Over America For "Public Safety" | Zero Hedge | Politicality | Scoop.it
The Federal Aviation Administration is working towards putting the finishing touches on rules and regulations for widespread domestic drone use, and the agency expects as many as 30,000 UAVs will be in America’s airspace by the decade’s end.
 
Via Joseph Pomponio
John Davis's insight:

add your insight...

 
more...
Joseph Pomponio's curator insight, January 10, 2013 11:55 PM

Been following this since last January. Local law enforcement can get training from Homeland Security. How far do we let surveilance go in this country? No oversight, checks and balances or simple rule. I'm sure we all appreciate security, but unfettered? We can do a lot better.

Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Chinese Firm Buys an American Solar Technology Start-Up

Chinese Firm Buys an American Solar Technology Start-Up | Politicality | Scoop.it
Hanergy Holding Group of China added to its international acquisitions with MiaSolé, a thin-film solar panel manufacturer that is considered one of Silicon Valley’s most promising young firms.
 
Via Monica S Mcfeeters
John Davis's insight:

add your insight...

 
more...
Joseph Pomponio's comment, January 13, 2013 7:28 AM
What happens to the plant?
Monica S Mcfeeters's comment, January 19, 2013 5:52 AM
The main article if you click on the heading will tell you this, "Mr. Li said he planned to keep MiaSolé’s manufacturing and research operations and staff in California, sending only two Chinese executives to join them. Hanergy also plans a larger factory in China using MiaSolé’s technology."
John Davis's comment, January 19, 2013 8:19 AM
Which gives the Chinese two advantages: Income from the plant in California and a template to improve their own plants.This puts us behind in a key technology venture.
Scooped by John Davis
Scoop.it!

Senators Discuss Options for Changing Filibuster : Roll Call News

Senators Discuss Options for Changing Filibuster : Roll Call News | Politicality | Scoop.it
A bipartisan group of eight senators Friday offered a proposal to change some of the chamber s rules in order to make it more productive and avert Democratic leaders threat to overhaul the filibuster.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Davis
Scoop.it!

Protesters Speak Out at NRA's Newtown Massacre Press Conference

http://www.storyofamerica.org Gun safety advocates organized by CREDO attempted to deliver 200,000 signatures to the NRA on the occasion of its first NRA press conference since the Sandy Hook Elementary massacre.

more...
Eric Byler's curator insight, December 23, 2012 2:42 PM

This video is part of in a new Story of America series about why America is so divided over gun control. Help us continue to do our work by donating to the Story of America's crowdfunding campaign. All donations are tax deductible. You can become a Founding Member, Angel Investor or Co-Producer.http://www.indiegogo.com/storyofamerica/

Scooped by John Davis
Scoop.it!

5 Easy Steps to Winning the Social Security Argument with Uncle Fox "News"

5 Easy Steps to Winning the Social Security Argument with Uncle Fox "News" | Politicality | Scoop.it

Social Security hustlers use the life expectancy argument to justify gutting America's best-loved program.


by LYNN STUART PARRAMORE, AlterNet


Trying to convince the public to cut America’s best-loved and most successful program requires a lot of creativity and persistence. Social Security is fiscally fit, prudently managed and does not add to the deficit because by law it must be completely detached from the federal operating budget. Obviously, it is needed more than ever in a time of increasing job insecurity and disappearing pensions. It helps our economy thrive and boosts the productivity of working Americans. And yet the sharks are in a frenzy to shred it in the upcoming “fiscal cliff” discussions.


The most popular red herring Social Security hustlers have unleashed into the waters of public discourse has grown into such a massive whale of a lie that liberals frequently subscribe to it. The idea goes like this: We need to somehow “fix” Social Security because people are living longer – “fix” in this context being code for “cut.” Two groups stand to benefit in the short-term from such a scheme: the greedy rich, who do not want to pay their share in taxes, and financiers, who want to move towards privatizing retirement accounts so they can collect fees. As for the masses of hard-working people who have rightfully earned their retirement, the only “fix” is the fix they will be in if already modest benefits are further reduced.


Here are five clear reasons why the life expectancy argument is nonsensical, counterproductive and based on a pack of lies.


1. Social Security’s original designers considered rising life expectancy.


On our red-herring tour, let’s start with the oft-repeated claim that the original designers of the program did not consider rising life expectancy in their calculations. Fortunately, public records pertaining to the lengthy and detailed discussions of the Roosevelt administration’s Committee on Economic Security (CES), tasked with constructing proposals for Social Security, are available for anyone to see. It is absolutely clear from the record that the designers knew that the number of people over the age of 65 was going to increase and that people were going to live longer. [MORE]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Davis
Scoop.it!

The New Evangelical Agenda

The New Evangelical Agenda | Politicality | Scoop.it
The ironic and tragic thing about the religious right is how little of their own agenda they have achieved. By voting for a conservative ideological agenda, they have actually hurt the poor, resisted immigration reform and promoted endless wars.
John Davis's insight:

This is just how they want it.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

John Boehner’s Hostage Crisis

John Boehner’s Hostage Crisis | Politicality | Scoop.it

by DAVID CORN, Mother Jones


In the past week or two, there's been crowing on the left about anti-tax crusader Grover Norquist's slipping influence, as a small—emphasis on small—number of congressional Republicans murmur that they might accept a tax/spending deal that includes a hike in rates for the wealthy. For years, Norquist has been the whip of the conservative movement, leaning on GOP candidates and legislators to commit to and stand by a no-tax pledge and acting as prosecutor, judge, and jury whenever any Republican considered any initiative that might possibly be characterized as a tax increase. But as President Barack Obama bargains (toughly) with House Speaker John Boehner as the fiscal cliff (or bump) nears, Norquist, his cachet waning or not, is not Boehner's problem. He is not the force that is preventing the speaker from striking a deal with an electorally energized Obama. The true obstacle is Boehner's own comrades: those scores of tea partiers in the House Republican caucus who detest compromise—especially with the president. As Boehner tries to forge an accord with Obama, he has to watch carefully his colleagues and his back.


This has been the challenge for Boehner for the past two years. There's not much doubt that in the summer of 2011 he sincerely desired attaining the so-called grand bargain Obama offered: spending cuts and Medicare and Medicaid reductions (that were harder on providers than beneficiaries) in return for greater tax revenues squeezed from the wealthy and corporations and a hike in the debt ceiling. And Boehner presumably would fancy producing such a mighty deal now. But two summers ago Boehner was warned by moderate Republicans in his caucus that if he accepted anything resembling the package Obama was offering he would face a rebellion, perhaps a mutiny, within his own caucus that might be led by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. That could have led to his demise as speaker.


This basic dynamic—Boehner cannot haggle freely with the president due to the intense opposition to a deal within his own ranks—has not fundamentally changed. What has changed is the president's hand. According to senior administration officials, Obama is not eager to go over the cliff, but he is willing. If no deal is reached by the end of the month, all the Bush tax cuts—for the rich and not rich—will evaporate. Obama would then demand in early January that the new Congress immediately pass legislation to reinstate the lower tax rates for the bottom 98 percent. Boehner and the Republicans presumably will find it difficult to say no and insist they will only vote for such tax relief if it includes breaks for the wealthy or cuts in Medicare and other government spending. As a Democratic strategist close to the White House says, "For years we've tried to make the case that the Republicans are willing to hold up tax cuts for 98 percent to help the guys at the top. This is the cleanest shot we've gotten at this." [MORE]


Via John Cashon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Sen. Boxer Proposes Federal Standards for Equal Access to Polling Places Regardless of Race, Political Affiliation

Sen. Boxer Proposes Federal Standards for Equal Access to Polling Places Regardless of Race, Political Affiliation | Politicality | Scoop.it

by AMANDA BECKER, Roll Call


Sen. Barbara Boxer on Wednesday became the latest lawmaker to introduce election reform legislation, proposing a plan aimed at shortening the long lines that greeted voters on Election Day.


The California Democrat would require the attorney general to work with the federal Election Assistance Commission to require states such as Florida, Ohio and Virginia — where voters waited more than 90 minutes to cast a ballot during the 2012 elections — to comply with a program to remedy such delays in the future. The attorney general and the commission would also develop national standards related to voting machines, election works and other necessary resources.


“It is unacceptable that many Americans had to wait in line for five, six or seven hours to cast their ballots,” Boxer said in a release. “The LINE Act will help ensure that every American has an equal chance to vote without enduring hours-long delays at their polling places.”


Boxer’s bill comes on the heels of a letter she sent last month to Republican congressional leaders that urged them to recommend Election Assistance Commission nominees after the panel sat without a single commissioner, executive director or general counsel during the elections. Boxer cited a CQ Roll Call report that the commission’s lack of Senate-confirmed leaders had undermined its mission. [MORE]


Via Eric Byler
more...
Party Recon's comment, December 6, 2012 10:45 AM
In Oregon, this isn't an issue. We get our ballots weeks before the election and are free to mail them in or drop them in secure boxes around the state. It is ludicrous in this day and age to force people to go to a poling place to vote. Tell Barb and her buddies in Washingotn that we want either a mail-in or electronic (via the internet) voting system NOW! Anything short of this impedes democracy.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Why Is Washington Focused on Deficits Instead Jobs?

Why Is Washington Focused on  Deficits Instead Jobs? | Politicality | Scoop.it

J. Mijin Cha explores the tension between "donor class" preference to focus on deficit reduction versus voters preference to focus on job creation and economic security policies.


by J. MIJIN CHA, Demos


Most available research indicates a significant difference in priorities between the majority of Americans and the affluent that comprise the political donor class, which may explain the current bi-partisan drive for deficit reduction at the expense of stimulus policies, in spite of persistent high unemployment.


Does Washington really care about job creation?


Despite near-record levels of unemployment and meager economic growth, the U.S. political system has focused far more on deficit reduction over the past two years than on job creation. Austerity dominates the current political debate even as the economy struggles to recover from the Great Recession. Bowing to political pressures, President Obama created a national fiscal commission in early 2010 to recommend ways to tame the national debt, and discussion about deficit reduction has dominated Washington since then.


As a result of the debt ceiling showdown last summer, Congress enacted significant spending reductions in the Budget Control Act of 2011, despite predicted near-term job losses. The Budget Control Act set a cap on spending on discretionary programs from FY 2013- 2022 at $1.5 trillion less than current levels. The Act also required across-the-board cuts (sequestration) if the “supercommittee” on deficit reduction failed to come up with adequate measures. As no compromise was reached, without Congressional action, the sequester will begin to take effect in FY 2013. Regardless, $1.5 trillion in spending cuts over a decade will be required starting next year, even if the sequester is avoided, bringing discretionary spending to the lowest level relative to the economy since the Eisenhower administration. If automatic spending cuts occur, an additional estimated 2.1 million jobs will be lost.


During this same period, proposals to address high unemployment and create jobs have seen far less traction in the national policy debate. There was no jobs commission created despite the high unemployment rate. President Obama’s American Jobs Act, introduced in September 2011, went nowhere in Congress and received only modest media attention. Even a bill specifically targeted at helping war veterans, a popular constituency, failed to garner enough support to overcome a filibuster last summer. [MORE]


Via Eric Byler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Charts: What if Obama spent like Reagan?

Charts: What if Obama spent like Reagan? | Politicality | Scoop.it

Here's something you may not know: While total government spending and investment fell during Obama's first term, it rose during Reagan's and George W. Bush's. What if Obama had followed suit?


by EZRA KLEIN, Washington Post

 

In 10 of the past 12 quarters, total government spending and investment has fallen, dragging down the Obama economy. That’s in large part because state and local cutbacks have been so severe, but it’s also because federal spending and investment has, on the whole, been falling since 2010.

This isn’t an unusual analysis. You can see the numbers for yourself if you head to the Bureau of Economic Analysis’s GDP data and scroll through column 21 of table 1.1.2. It’s simply a fact that real government spending fell in three of President Obama’s first four years.

That made me curious: How does government spending and investment during Obama’s first term compare to Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush’s first terms? The answer is poorly. Whereas total government spending dropped in 10 out of the 16 quarters that comprised Obama’s first term, it rose in 13 out of Reagan’s first 16 quarters, and 13 out of Bush’s first 16 quarters.

Or, to put it differently, over Obama’s first term, falling government spending and investment snipped, on average, .11 percentage points of GDP off of (annualized) quarterly growth. During Reagan’s first term, it added .68 percentage points, and during Bush’s first term, it added .52 percentage points. [MORE] 


Via Coffee Party USA
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Noam Chomsky - Rightward Shift of US Politics

Noam Chomsky is Professor Emeritus at MIT, and one of the nation's leading intellectual critics of the US political, corporate and national security apparatu...

Via Michael Charney, Coffee Party USA
more...
Michael Charney's curator insight, February 3, 2013 9:41 AM

For those of us who aren't interested in the Super Bowl (you know who you are!), here's an alternative way to spend an hour this evening....

Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Why We Can’t Shop Our Way to a Better Economy: Stacy Mitchell’s TEDx Talk

Why We Can’t Shop Our Way to a Better Economy: Stacy Mitchell’s TEDx Talk | Politicality | Scoop.it

“As remarkable as these trends are, they are unlikely to amount to more than an small sideshow on the margins of the mainstream if the only way we can conceive of confronting corporate power and bringing about a new economy is through our buying decisions… What we really need to do is change the underlying policies that shape our economy. We can’t do that through the sum of our individual behavior in the marketplace. We can only do it by exercising our collective power as citizens.”


Via jean lievens, Monica S Mcfeeters
more...
Coffee Party USA's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:59 PM

This is very worth the time it takes to listen. A great summary of where we are today.

Rhett Rebold's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:20 AM

This is very worth the time it takes to listen. A great summary of where we are today.

Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

ALEC Limo Maims "Only a Bill" Character from School House Rock

"ALEC Rock" Produced by Mark Fiore and the Center for Media and Democracy, which is the creator of ALECexposed, and co-produced by the Alliance for a Better Utah.

 
Via Eric Byler
John Davis's insight:

add your insight...

 
more...
Eric Byler's comment, December 26, 2012 3:13 AM
Many of us were introduced to our federal legislative process through School House Rock, which was mixed in with our Saturday morning cartoons. This updated video confronts us with the corrupt process we have today, due in large part to a shadowy quasi-legislative body called ALEC (American Legislative Exchange Council).
Portland Coffee Party's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:43 AM

Too scarily true.  What can be done to stop lobbying groups like ALEC?

Party Recon's curator insight, January 14, 2013 3:43 PM

How are we to rescue our governmnet from the hands of big business and the uber-wealthy?  The answers can all be found at www.partyrecon.org.

Rescooped by John Davis from Portland Coffee Party
Scoop.it!

On Second Thought, I was Right | Party Recon

On Second Thought, I was Right | Party Recon | Politicality | Scoop.it
Few of us will ever forget the events that transpired in Newton, MA on Friday, December 14, 2012 and the visceral battle that ensued between pro and anti-gun forces in the days that followed.
 
Via Party Recon, Portland Coffee Party
John Davis's insight:

add your insight...

 
more...
Party Recon's curator insight, January 11, 2013 6:31 PM

What price are we willing to pay for instant justice?  In times of tragedy, calmer heads must prevail.

Portland Coffee Party's curator insight, January 11, 2013 6:41 PM

What price are we willing to pay for instant justice?  In times of tragedy, calmer heads must prevail.

Scooped by John Davis
Scoop.it!

Those Who Despise the Radical Son Will Fall in Love With his Progressive Daughter

Those Who Despise the Radical Son Will Fall in Love With his Progressive Daughter | Politicality | Scoop.it
Meet the late Sarah Horowitz, child of political activist David Horowitz, who managed to fuse the painful lessons of her father’s life with a mystical Judaism to complete the task he never could: showing how the Left could save itself from...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Send in the Clowns

Send in the Clowns | Politicality | Scoop.it

If Republicans continue to be led by a base that denies global warming after Sandy and refuses to ban assault weapons after Sandy Hook, then the party has no future.

 

Excerpts from column by THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN, NY Times


Republican politicians today have a choice: either change your base by educating and leading G.O.P. voters back to the center-right from the far right, or start a new party that is more inclusive, focused on smaller but smarter government and market-based, fact-based solutions to our biggest problems.

 

But if Republicans continue to be led around by, and live in fear of, a base that denies global warming after Hurricane Sandy and refuses to ban assault weapons after Sandy Hook — a base that would rather see every American’s taxes rise rather than increase taxes on millionaires — the party has no future. It can’t win with a base that is at war with math, physics, human biology, economics and common-sense gun laws all at the same time.

 

...Because they control the House, this radical Republican base is now holding us all back. President Obama was moving to the center in these budget negotiations. He reduced his demand for higher tax revenues to $1.2 trillion from $1.6 trillion; he upped the level at which Americans who would be hit with higher taxes to those earning $400,000 a year from $250,000; and he made his own base holler by offering to cut long-term spending by lowering the inflation adjustment index for Social Security. It seemed that with a little more Republican compromise, Obama would have met them in the middle, and we could have had a grand bargain that would put the country on a sounder fiscal trajectory and signal to the markets, the world and ourselves that we can still do big hard things together. That will have to wait. Now the best hope is some mini-, crisis-averting, Band-Aid. [MORE]



Via Eric Byler
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Davis
Scoop.it!

America's Poorest Lost Almost EVERYTHING During The Great Recession

America's Poorest Lost Almost EVERYTHING During The Great Recession | Politicality | Scoop.it
Families living in poor neighborhoods lost almost everything during the Great Recession, potentially making it more difficult for them to gain a better life in the future, according to a recent report.
more...
eNews 's curator insight, August 13, 2014 12:36 PM
Giftbasketvillas.com
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party Science
Scoop.it!

Making the Case for a Government Hand in Research

Making the Case for a Government Hand in Research | Politicality | Scoop.it

At a time of looming budget cuts, advocates of government financing of technology research argue that it is an investment in the nation’s future.


by STEVE LOHR, New York Times


LUIS VON AHN, a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University, sold one Internet start-up to Google in 2009, and is now on to another. With the new company, Duolingo, he hopes to tap the millions of people learning languages online to create a crowdsourced engine of translation. “We want to translate the whole Web into every major language,” Mr. von Ahn says.

Enlarge This Image.

Ambitious, sure, but Duolingo recently attracted $15 million of venture capital. The investors are betting on Mr. von Ahn, his idea and his growing team of 18 engineers, language experts and Web designers.


Mr. von Ahn, 33, personifies some of the essential ingredients of America’s innovation culture, when it works well. An immigrant from Guatemala, he has intelligence and entrepreneurial energy to spare. And he has received a helping hand from the federal government. Duolingo began as a university research project financed by theNational Science Foundation.


That pattern has been repeated countless times over the years. Government support plays a vital role in incubating new ideas that are harvested by the private sector, sometimes many years later, creating companies and jobs. A report published this year by the National Research Council, a government advisory group, looked at eight computing technologies, including digital communications, databases, computer architectures and artificial intelligence, tracing government-financed research to commercialization. It calculated the portion of revenue at 30 well-known corporations that could be traced back to the seed research backed by government agencies. The total was nearly $500 billion a year.


“If you take any major information technology company today, from Google to Intel to Qualcomm to Apple to Microsoft and beyond, you can trace the core technologies to the rich synergy between federally funded universities and industry research and development,” says Peter Lee, a corporate vice president of Microsoft Research. Dr. Lee headed the National Research Council committee that produced the report, titled “Continuing Innovation in Information Technology.”

MORE: http://ow.ly/ehmA9  ;



Via Eric Byler
more...
John Davis's curator insight, January 12, 2013 11:11 AM

add your insight...

 
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

A Land Without Guns: How Japan Has Virtually Eliminated Shooting Deaths

A Land Without Guns: How Japan Has Virtually Eliminated Shooting Deaths | Politicality | Scoop.it
In part by forbidding almost all forms of firearm ownership, Japan has as few as two gun-related homicides a year.

Via Lynda Park
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Republicans losing blame game on fiscal cliff

Republicans losing blame game on fiscal cliff | Politicality | Scoop.it

by CHRIS CILLIZZA, AARON BLAKE and SEAN SULLIVAN, The Washington Post


A majority of Americans say that if the country goes over the fiscal cliff on Dec. 31, congressional Republicans should bear the brunt of the blame, according to a new Washington Post-Pew Research Center poll, the latest sign that the GOP faces a perilous path on the issue between now and the end of the year.


While 53 percent of those surveyed say the GOP would (and should) lose the fiscal cliff blame game, just 27 percent say President Obama would be deserving of more of the blame. Roughly one in 10 (12 percent) volunteer that both sides would be equally to blame.


Those numbers are largely unchanged from a Post-Pew survey conducted three weeks ago and suggest that for all of the back and forth in Washington on the fiscal cliff, there has been little movement in public perception. The numbers also explain why Republicans privately fret about the political dangers of going over the cliff, while Democrats are more sanguine about such a prospect.


The blame question is all the more relevant because a near majority — 49 percent — of those polled expect the Dec. 31 deadline to pass without a deal, while 40 percent expect a deal to be cut. Perhaps indicative of which side believes it has the upper hand in the negotiations, 55 percent of self-identified Democrats believe there will be a deal, while just 22 percent of Republicans feel the same. Thirty-seven percent of independents expect a deal; 52 percent do not.


There also appears to be a disconnect between a general sense that going over the cliff would be bad for the country and an acknowledgement of what it would mean for peoples’ lives.


Roughly two-thirds of all Americans say that not meeting the Dec. 31 deadline would have “major” consequences for the U.S. economy, but just 43 percent believe that it would have a “major effect” on their personal finances — despite the fact that taxes would go up on the vast majority of the population on Jan. 1 if no deal can be reached. [MORE]



Via John Cashon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Davis from Coffee Party News
Scoop.it!

Republicans not handling election results well

Republicans not handling election results well | Politicality | Scoop.it

PPP's first post election national poll finds that Republicans are taking the results pretty hard...and also declining in numbers.


49% of GOP voters nationally say they think that ACORN stole the election for President Obama. We found that 52% of Republicans thought that ACORN stole the 2008 election for Obama, so this is a modest decline, but perhaps smaller than might have been expected given that ACORN doesn't exist anymore.


Some GOP voters are so unhappy with the outcome that they no longer care to be a part of the United States. 25% of Republicans say they would like their state to secede from the union compared to 56% who want to stay and 19% who aren't sure.


One reason that such a high percentage of Republicans are holding what could be seen as extreme views is that their numbers are declining. Our final poll before the election, which hit the final outcome almost on the head, found 39% of voters identifying themselves as Democrats and 37% as Republicans. Since the election we've seen a 5 point increase in Democratic identification to 44%, and a 5 point decrease in Republican identification to 32%. [MORE]


Via Lynda Park
more...
No comment yet.