Political Organization
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Political Organization
The creation of Political Organization.
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A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem

A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem | Political Organization | Scoop.it
On three different occasions, the candidate with the most votes didn't become President of the United States. We call this "The Electoral College Problem." Here a solution. Simple. Mathematical. Rational.

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Amy Knoles Moore's insight:

The ultimate gerrymandering.

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Gary Pascoa's comment, March 1, 2013 9:43 PM
I know the founding fathers would be horrified as this cuts into the whole idea of the electoral college: to place a further check on the majority when electing a president. Nonetheless, I would support a redrawing of the map that would lean toward a popular vote system.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:27 PM
Interesting idea, however I can't say this is a "rational" solution to the Electoral College. It is actually completely irrational to think that the borders could be redrawn and everyone could be redistricted every four years... They can't even manage to get a census out every year... Logistical nightmare. I agree with Ken and Gary, let the people choose with the popular vote
Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 5, 2015 5:02 PM

Far out

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Boundary conditions

Boundary conditions | Political Organization | Scoop.it
PULL a spring, let it go, and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back until, quite suddenly, it won't....

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Joel Barker's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:56 AM

A useful discussion on limits of the planet

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 8:23 AM

This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs."

Angus Henderson's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:49 AM

An interesting counter-balance to the work of the Planetary Boundaries group. 

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Can Europe Survive the Rise of the Rest?

Can Europe Survive the Rise of the Rest? | Political Organization | Scoop.it
The European Union will never manage to compete with China and other rising powers unless it unites politically, scales up and becomes a genuine giant.
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Insecure Space and Precarious Geographies

Insecure Space and Precarious Geographies | Political Organization | Scoop.it

This is an intriguing look into security, terrorism, politics and the city.  The most interesting places are often the most unconventional and places like Jerusalem with it's geopolitical importance, makes for a very compelling urban landscape. 


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‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’

‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’ | Political Organization | Scoop.it
The filmmakers present a 12-step program to establish the world’s newest country: South Sudan.

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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:51 PM

This is a really interesting dynamic to look into, as it's not everyday the process of founding a country can be seen at work. That's a true once in a lifetime experience for those involved, and is likely one of the harder jobs in the entirety of history.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:46 AM

This video and article highlight the steps a new country takes when it is carved out of an old one.  The problems and tribulations the new country faces and how it responds to the rest of the international community will decide if it will be a long lasting country or just a blip on the road of the original countries history.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 2015 6:33 PM

I think building a country from scratch mostly needs a plan for strong governance. Some of the items mentioned in the video would eventually be necessary (i.e. an anthem or a flag), but not exactly a top priority as the country could function without these. Rather the items like taxes and training the police are hugely important. A society needs the revenue to grow and the police to keep order. However, what disturbed me about this video is there were no other real mention of government institutions. Now I am not saying that the Constitution needs to be exactly like the United States, but the following is needed: a plan for how to treat the citizens, implement social programs, create/review the law, get officials into office, etc. Without looking at these basic questions of government, there is no way the country can function because there aren’t actually the procedures in place when problems do arise.

 

After strong governance, I also think that recognition in our globalized world is needed as well. In order for a country to prosper, the country will need to rely on other nations at one point in time for things like trading. If enough countries just refused to recognize the area and as such refused to trade then the country would more than likely fail. Luckily, Sudan is recognized by the United States and the UN did come to speak with the nation. SO that doesn’t seem to be an issue.

 

To me these are the top two things needed and since one is greatly missing, I am not surprised by the problems Sudan has.  

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | Political Organization | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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Could Asia really go to war over these?

Could Asia really go to war over these? | Political Organization | Scoop.it
THE countries of Asia do not exactly see the world in a grain of sand, but they have identified grave threats to the national interest in the tiny outcrops and...

 

BD: One Chinese newspaper has helpfully suggested skipping the pointless diplomacy and moving straight to the main course by serving up Japan with an atom bomb.  At first I was drawn to this article because the correlation made to the British Isles discussion we had in class. As in Europe, parties on both sides are seemingly prepared for militaristic interaction in the coming years. However both Japanese and Chinese governments have downplayed theses extreme positions at this time. Of course both Japan and China have historical claims to the uninhabited islands. More important than the territory, it is the climate of international relations between the two major powers that is the cause of concern. Both sides are refusing to back down for fear of “setting a precedent” meaning if a concession is made on either side, the other would take advantage of the rivals weakness and “scheme against it.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, October 5, 2012 3:24 PM
At first I was drawn to this article because the correlation made to the British Isles discussion we had in class. As in Europe, parties on both sides are seemingly prepared for militaristic interaction in the coming years. However both Japanese and Chinese governments have downplayed theses extreme positions at this time. Of course both Japan and China have historical claims to the uninhabited islands. More important than the territory, it is the climate of international relations between the two major powers that is the cause of concern. Both sides are refusing to back down for fear of “setting a precedent” meaning if a concession is made on either side, the other would take advantage of the rivals weakness and “scheme against it.”
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Catalonia asks Spain for 9 Billion Euros

Catalonia asks Spain for 9 Billion Euros | Political Organization | Scoop.it
The independence-minded region of Catalonia asks the Spanish central government for an extra 9bn euros (£7.7bn) in bailout money.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:21 AM

This is sad news for an area that is trying to persuede the world it deserves to be independent. Unfortunately,  they still have to rely on the Spanish government to help their economy, something that does not help their case.  While other countries do take money from other powers, one that is trying to establish itself might want to have a more optimistic outlook on it's economy before it tries to go off on it's own.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:28 AM

This area seems to want it both ways.  To be independent from Spain, but also dependent economically on Spain.  This region should sort out its priorities and decided if independents is worth it and if so then they should not be asking Spain for help.  It’s like a twenty-something person that moves out of their parents’ house and then comes back again and again with their hand out.  Catalonia seems to be facing this same issue.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:00 PM

Catalonia, an independent region wants Spain to give them 9 billion euros in order to help them stay out of debt, but also want to keep themselves independent of Spain. The most interesting aspect of this article is how the region of Catalonia wants to be independent, but still seek help from the very place it wants to be independent from.

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Political Organization | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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BBC NEWS | Africa | Eritrea denies Djibouti war claim

BBC NEWS | Africa | Eritrea denies Djibouti war claim | Political Organization | Scoop.it
Eritrea denies wanting war with Djibouti, which has gone to the UN Security Council to ask them to stop a conflict.
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Escalation of Congo civil war forecast

Supporters of Republic of Congo President Pascal Lissouba and his rival and predecessor, Denis SassouNguesso, have engaged in political and ethnic fighting in Brazzaville for nearly two...
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Enclaves

Enclaves | Political Organization | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 AM
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:46 PM

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!

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Is Mali the next Afghanistan?

Is Mali the next Afghanistan? | Political Organization | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 21, 2013 11:28 AM

Some cultural background on the group that is at the center of the latest political turmoil in the Sahel region in Africa.

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Euro crisis turns German-speaking Italians against Rome

Euro crisis turns German-speaking Italians against Rome | Political Organization | Scoop.it
South Tyrol is Italy's richest province, a largely German-speaking part of the country that has autonomous status, but now the euro crisis means the Italian government wants to cash in.

 

SR: In regards to the lecture on Europe, this article portrays the different cultural differences and tension between the Germans and Italians.  Is Separatism the answer to this conflict?

 


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Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | Political Organization | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 

 

Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.
benjamin costello's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:36 PM

This is great idea. I wonder if I can use something like this for my project.

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A tortuous triangle

A tortuous triangle | Political Organization | Scoop.it
SNAKING their way from Kirkuk, a city 240 kilometres (150 miles) north of Baghdad, through Kurdistan and across Turkey’s eastern region of Anatolia to the...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 20, 2012 1:01 PM

Why does the Kurdish population, despite being a territorially contiguous population, unable to control their own destiny?  They are often caught in other geopolitical struggles of the Middle East because:

  1. they are divided between 4 countries (Syria, Iraq Iran and Turkey).  
  2. The mountanous terrain also divides the Kurds
  3. Oil resources ensure that outside forces will fight to control this area