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18 Free Web Tools for the Classroom - The ICT A...

18 Free Web Tools for the Classroom - The ICT A... | politcs | Scoop.it
A list of 18 Free Web Tools for the Classroom, with a short explanation of each one!
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5 Easy Steps to Your Successful Social Media Marketing Strategy

5 Easy Steps to Your Successful Social Media Marketing Strategy | politcs | Scoop.it
5 Easy Steps to Your Successful Social Media Marketing Strategy:Most business houses appreciate the power of social media and its potential to promote (social media marketing strategy tips http://t.co/suB5ccijlb)...

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Graig Angarella's curator insight, February 26, 2:44 AM

I enjoyed reading this article, because it seemed to go hand-in-hand with what we have learned so far in class this semester. In different terms, it simply outlines a successful marketing plan. To start, it mentions clearly defining your objectives and business goals. As we have learned, this is important and should always be the first thing we do. In addition to stating we should monitor our progress, the article says that we should re-assess our strategy at regular intervals. This makes sense, because it would keep complacency from occurring. Next, and as we know, we should correctly identify our target audience, and then after that, we should make sure to target the right social media platforms. One thing that differs however, is that the article recommends creating a social media calendar. I liked that it had mentioned identifying the best marketing channels as well to reach out in the best way possible to consumers. Lastly, step five discussed the Unique Selling Proposition (USP), and it's importance in social media marketing. The USP (which I just learned about today) is the crucial feature or set of features that sets your company apart from others in similar businesses. Overall, this article not only refreshed my memory towards a proper marketing plan, but also introduced new marketing tactics, that I could see becoming very useful for one's company.

Comunicologos.com's curator insight, February 28, 8:25 AM

5 pasos para una estrategia exitosa de Social Media

Ivo Nový's curator insight, March 24, 7:31 AM

In any case before taking advantage of any social media network, clearly define your objectives and business goals..

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The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | politcs | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2:44 PM

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 3:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 7:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | politcs | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


Via Seth Dixon
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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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Scientists Probe Human Nature and Discover We are Good After All

Scientists Probe Human Nature and Discover We are Good After All | politcs | Scoop.it
A new set of studies provides compelling data allowing us to analyze human nature not through a philosopher’s kaleidoscope or a TV producer’s camera, but through the clear lens of science. These studies were carried out by a diverse group of researchers from Harvard and Yale—a developmental psychologist with a background in evolutionary game theory, a moral philosopher-turned-psychologist, and a biologist-cum-mathematician—interested in the same essential question: whether our automatic impulse—our first instinct—is to act selfishly or cooperatively.

 

This focus on first instincts stems from the dual process framework of decision-making, which explains decisions (and behavior) in terms of two mechanisms: intuition and reflection. Intuition is often automatic and effortless, leading to actions that occur without insight into the reasons behind them. Reflection, on the other hand, is all about conscious thought—identifying possible behaviors, weighing the costs and benefits of likely outcomes, and rationally deciding on a course of action. With this dual process framework in mind, we can boil the complexities of basic human nature down to a simple question: which behavior—selfishness or cooperation—is intuitive, and which is the product of rational reflection? In other words, do we cooperate when we overcome our intuitive selfishness with rational self-control, or do we act selfishly when we override our intuitive cooperative impulses with rational self-interest?

 

To answer this question, the researchers first took advantage of a reliable difference between intuition and reflection: intuitive processes operate quickly, whereas reflective processes operate relatively slowly. Whichever behavioral tendency—selfishness or cooperation—predominates when people act quickly is likely to be the intuitive response; it is the response most likely to be aligned with basic human nature.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Digital Pedagogy, Play, and Mass Collaboration

Digital Pedagogy, Play, and Mass Collaboration | politcs | Scoop.it

This summer Hybrid Pedagogy ran the experimental course, MOOC MOOC, a mini-MOOC, a meta-MOOC, a MOOC about MOOCs. The course was announced in the Hybrid Pedagogy article, “The March of the MOOCs: Monstrous Open Online Courses,” in which Jesse argues, “Content and learning are two separate things, often at odds… Most content is finite and contained; whereas, learning is chaotic and indeterminate. It’s relatively easy to create technological infrastructures to deliver content, harder to build relationships and learning communities to help mediate, inflect, and disrupt that content.”While institutions ponder how to make excursions into new media more efficient and profitable, the pedagogues at the digital table must push the other side of the envelope. We should be creating critical and reflective sandboxes that invite learners to set their own goals, make mistakes, collaborate, and improvise.


Via Hybrid Pedagogy, Debra Harkins
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The separate and equal university

The separate and equal university | politcs | Scoop.it
Universities have long argued that top researchers make passionate teachers, but cutting-edge inquiry and learning may be better served when institutions choose between those missions...

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Supreme Court to review minority voting rights law - BREAKING NEWS

Supreme Court to review minority voting rights law - BREAKING NEWS | politcs | Scoop.it

(Reuters) -

The Supreme Court on Friday agreed to review a legal challenge to the Voting Rights Act, a landmark law adopted in 1965 to protect African-American voters who had faced decades of discrimination at the polls.

 

The high court accepted an appeal brought by Shelby County, Alabama, challenging a core provision of the act that requires nine states and several local governments with a history of bias to get federal permission to change their election procedures.


Via Michael Charney
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Colleges Awakening to the Opportunities of Data Mining

Colleges Awakening to the Opportunities of Data Mining | politcs | Scoop.it
Netflix meets Google meets academia. Data mining is reshaping the college experience.

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Wind Map

Wind Map | politcs | Scoop.it

This is a repeat, but you simply MUST check out Louisiana right now on this map as Hurricane Isaac has made landfall.  

 

"This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version."


Via Seth Dixon
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Ken Morrison's comment, August 30, 2012 8:25 PM
That was cool. Thanks for sharing. I have a new fun tool for virtual storm chasing. I'm not as adventurous as I used to be. Is there any chance that there is an international version? We had a big typhoon in Asia this past week. Crazy weather.
Luis Sadeck 's comment, September 24, 2013 9:01 AM
Very crazy this map! One good application from technics of collect of data and building of map enviromental.

Thanks for sharing
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 8:53 AM

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!

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The Death and Life of Higher Education | The John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy

We desperately need to equip and inspire our next generation to take on the opportunities and challenges of the twenty-first century. But our traditional universities have become trapped in a bureaucratic death spiral, more interested in preserving and expanding pay and perks for tenured faculty and administrators than serving students.


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NASA: 64 Million Tons of Dust Dominates Foreign Aerosol Imports to North America

NASA: 64 Million Tons of Dust Dominates Foreign Aerosol Imports to North America | politcs | Scoop.it
NASA and university scientists have made the first measurement-based estimate of the amount and composition of tiny airborne particles that arrive in the air over North America each year. With a 3-D view of the atmosphere now possible from satellites, the scientists calculated that dust, not pollution, is the main ingredient of these imports.

 

According to a new analysis of NASA satellite data, 64 million tons of dust, pollution and other particles that have potential climate and human health effects survive a trans-ocean journey to arrive over North America each year. This is nearly as much as the estimated 69 million tons of aerosols produced domestically from natural processes, transportation and industrial sources.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The human microbiome: Me, myself, us

The human microbiome: Me, myself, us | politcs | Scoop.it

Looking at human beings as ecosystems that contain many collaborating and competing species could change the practice of medicine.

 

A human being is an individual who has grown from a fertilised egg which contained genes from both father and mother. A growing band of biologists, however, think this definition incomplete. They see people not just as individuals, but also as ecosystems. In their view, the descendant of the fertilised egg is merely one component of the system. The others are trillions of bacteria, each equally an individual, which are found in a person’s gut, his mouth, his scalp, his skin and all of the crevices and orifices that subtend from his body’s surface.

 

A healthy adult human harbours some 100 trillion bacteria in his gut alone. That is ten times as many bacterial cells as he has cells descended from the sperm and egg of his parents. These bugs, moreover, are diverse. Egg and sperm provide about 23,000 different genes. The microbiome, as the body’s commensal bacteria are collectively known, is reckoned to have around 3m. Admittedly, many of those millions are variations on common themes, but equally many are not, and even the number of those that are adds something to the body’s genetic mix.


Via Cesar Sanchez, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Selingo's new book dissects the 'decay' of modern-day higher education - Washington Post (blog)

Selingo's new book dissects the 'decay' of modern-day higher education - Washington Post (blog) | politcs | Scoop.it
Selingo's new book dissects the 'decay' of modern-day higher education
Washington Post (blog)
Insiders know higher education is in upheaval, with free online classes proliferating, tuition surging and public universities struggling.
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Debra Harkins's curator insight, May 5, 2013 9:36 PM

Call for book review of Selingo's new book on 'decay" of higher education:  submit book review to editor, Debra Harkins, dharkins1@verzon.net 

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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | politcs | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."


Via Seth Dixon
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Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 14, 2013 3:36 AM

wow

Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | politcs | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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A Native Caste Society

A Native Caste Society | politcs | Scoop.it

Caste is alive and well in this country, where a still unsettled multiracial society is emerging from a starkly drawn social order.


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Israel - Gaza conflict

Israel - Gaza conflict | politcs | Scoop.it
Israeli airstrikes began November 14, following months of Palestinian rocket fire into Israel.

 

"Monday, the top leader of Hamas dared Israel to launch a ground invasion of Gaza and dismissed diplomatic efforts to broker a cease-fire in the six-day-old conflict, as the Israeli military conducted a new wave of deadly airstrikes which included a second hit on a 15-story building that houses media outlets."  This photo essay shows 34 powerful images that are emerging from this deadly conflict.  If students need some background to understand who are the major players in this conflict, this glossary should be helpful. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Wen Shi's curator insight, July 13, 4:17 AM

I was so shocked while reading this ariticle and seeing those pictures. The conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis is something that is deeply rooted in the history of the two nations. And the war, resulted by this conflict, has taken away many people's lives. The 2 countries's people are suffering. Many kids are just at our ages, they could not get education or anything else that we take for granted here, even had to bear the pain of losing relatives and homes. I could never imagine how sad and disastrous wars can be. :(

Hossan Epiques Novelle's curator insight, July 13, 4:58 AM

The two countries should take the chance to resolve the conflict amicably before the situation tips over and war is inevitable. The loss of lives resulting from the war would be pointless.

Zhiyang Liang's curator insight, July 13, 12:02 PM

In my perspective, why does people will have a thought of eliminating prejudice is that prejudice can lead to unfair treatment or the violation of rights of individuals or groups of people just like the conflict between Israel and Gaza.

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Digital Pedagogy, Play, and Mass Collaboration

Digital Pedagogy, Play, and Mass Collaboration | politcs | Scoop.it

This summer Hybrid Pedagogy ran the experimental course, MOOC MOOC, a mini-MOOC, a meta-MOOC, a MOOC about MOOCs. The course was announced in the Hybrid Pedagogy article, “The March of the MOOCs: Monstrous Open Online Courses,” in which Jesse argues, “Content and learning are two separate things, often at odds… Most content is finite and contained; whereas, learning is chaotic and indeterminate. It’s relatively easy to create technological infrastructures to deliver content, harder to build relationships and learning communities to help mediate, inflect, and disrupt that content.”While institutions ponder how to make excursions into new media more efficient and profitable, the pedagogues at the digital table must push the other side of the envelope. We should be creating critical and reflective sandboxes that invite learners to set their own goals, make mistakes, collaborate, and improvise.


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Largest U.S. Genetic Biobank Reveals Early Findings

Largest U.S. Genetic Biobank Reveals Early Findings | politcs | Scoop.it

Researchers who have assembled a trove of genetic and medical data on 100,000 northern Californians unveiled their initial findings here this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG). The effort, which may be the largest such "biobank" in the United States, has already yielded an intriguing connection between mortality and telomeres, the protective DNA sequences that cap chromosome ends, and found new links between genetic variants and disease traits. And that's just the beginning, say the biobank's curators at Kaiser Permanente (KP), the giant health care organization.

 

The KP biobank, which will draw on a variety of anonymized data drawn from patients' medical records—from medications to brain images—is also open to outside researchers. "This is obviously a very rich set of data that we want to be widely used," Schaefer says. Her team will deposit a data set in dbGaP, an NIH database for sharing SNPs data sets. Researchers can also apply to collaborate with the Kaiser Permanente team. Exactly how it will be used will be "up to the creativity and ingenuity of lots of people," Risch says. For example, researchers could use geographical databases on air pollution to look for links between illness and pollution. The biobank may also grow—a total of 200,000 KP members have donated biological samples and 430,000 have filled out a survey saying they're interested in participating.

 

"It's great. They have a huge data set," says Aravinda Chakravarti, a human geneticist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, who is already discussing collaboration with KP. However, he expressed reservations about the general push to link genes to diseases—at the ASHG meeting, many talks discussed efforts to sequence part or all of peoples' genomes to uncover rarer disease genes than SNP studies can find. "The problem in our field is that we're making lists" of disease genes, Chakravarti says. Like some others, he would like to see more emphasis on understanding the biology of how those genes function and cause illness.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries | politcs | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.

 

This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   

 

Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Don Brown Jr's comment, November 5, 2012 1:22 PM
Military conflict is often at times overlooked at as a source of language diffusion however the information displayed in this article can help explain how English has become one of the most popular languages in the world today.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:33 PM

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 8:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.

 

The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.

 

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The Party of Purge

The Party of Purge | politcs | Scoop.it

by MICHAEL CHARNEY

 

If you watched any part of last night’s opening session of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, NC, you were offered a unique opportunity to see the stark differences between our two largest political parties.

 

And you didn’t even have to turn the sound on.

 

Watching as the cameras panned across the filled arena was like seeing the history of our country writ large: faces of every imaginable color and type created a collage of inclusion, a tangible sense that the Democratic Party cares about everyone, wants to be part of everyone’s lives.

 

Not so the GOP... [MORE]


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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | politcs | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

The Graphic Foundations of American History Capturing the Past Through Maps Disease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental Mapping Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography The Cartographic Consolidating of America

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA


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Genome Sequencing Offers Intelligent Treatment Of Cancer And Glimpses Into The Future Of Medicine

Genome Sequencing Offers Intelligent Treatment Of Cancer And Glimpses Into The Future Of Medicine | politcs | Scoop.it

A novel method known as whole genome sequencing focuses on genes that drive a cancer, not the tissues or organ where it originates.

 

With a steep drop in the costs of sequencing and an explosion of research on genes, medical experts expect that genetic analyses of cancers will become routine. Just as pathologists do blood cultures to decide which antibiotics will stop a patient’s bacterial infection, so will genome sequencing determine which drugs might stop a cancer.

 

“Until you know what is driving a patient’s cancer, you really don’t have any chance of getting it right,” Dr. Ley said. “For the past 40 years, we have been sending generals into battle without a map of the battlefield. What we are doing now is building the map.”

 

Large drug companies and small biotechs are jumping in, starting to test drugs that attack a gene rather than a tumor type.

 

Leading cancer researchers are starting companies to find genes that might be causing an individual’s cancer to grow, to analyze genetic data and to find and test new drugs directed against these genetic targets. Leading venture capital firms are jumping into the field and getting involved.


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100,000 AD: Living into the deep future - Can our species survive?

100,000 AD: Living into the deep future - Can our species survive? | politcs | Scoop.it

In the 21st century, it can feel as if the future has already arrived. But we're only getting started. It's fashionable to be pessimistic about our prospects, yet our species may very well endure for at least 100,000 years.

 

So what's in store for us? We now have the perspective to identify the forces and trends that have shaped humanity and the Earth to date. With this knowledge, we can make intelligent predictions about what is to come. Indeed, many groups are now attempting to extend humanity's horizons far beyond the next century, from the Long Now Foundation to those who say our presence is forging a new geological era. The deep future is only just beginning...


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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