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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Information Technologies and Political Rights
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FBI’s Plan to Expand Hacking Power Advances Despite Privacy Fears

FBI’s Plan to Expand Hacking Power Advances Despite Privacy Fears | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Google had warned that the rule change represents a "monumental" constitutional concern.

Via Bob Boynton
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Bob Boynton's curator insight, March 17, 10:43 AM

If only we could get rid of that pesky 4th amendment. I guess we will have to do it one piece at a time. You did hear Republicans screaming about constitutional rewriting didn't you?

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The Internet was supposed to fight back yesterday. Instead, it fizzled.

The Internet was supposed to fight back yesterday. Instead, it fizzled. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Online freedom activists tried to relight the digital fire from the SOPA/PIPA blackout. But it fizzled.

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Bob Boynton's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:58 PM

“To invade the privacy of American citizens and legal residents, violating the sovereignty of the United States and European countries, is mind-boggling,” said Neamin Zeleke, managing director for the news service"


But we have been assured that spying is completely legal, and that everyone does it. How can it then be mind-boggling?


And why it there little or no regulation?


"Technology developed in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks has provided the foundation for a multibillion-dollar industry with its own annual conferences, where firms based in the most developed countries offer surveillance products to governments that don’t yet have the ability to produce their own."


Well, it is a multi-billion dollar 'industry.' And we would not want to stand in the way of multi-billions.

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FBI is increasing pressure on suspects in Stuxnet inquiry

FBI is increasing pressure on suspects in Stuxnet inquiry | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
New software gives FBI a potent tool in its search for who leaked classified intel about computer virus.

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Think the Supreme Court protected your cellphone from warrantless searches? Think again.

Think the Supreme Court protected your cellphone from warrantless searches? Think again. | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Even after the Court's ruling on mobile privacy this year, travelers are still subject to warrantless searches at the border and airports.

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Bob Boynton's curator insight, July 31, 2014 3:55 PM

Oh dear -- do you think I should throw my phone away before returning from Germany in a couple of weeks? It has suspicious emails to my family on it.

Rescooped by Rob Duke from ICT Security-Sécurité PC et Internet
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EU to vote to suspend U.S. data sharing agreements, passenger records amid NSA spying scandal

EU to vote to suspend U.S. data sharing agreements, passenger records amid NSA spying scandal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The European Parliament will vote — ironically of all days, on U.S. Independence Day on July 4 — whether existing data sharing agreements between the two continents should be suspended, following allegations that U.S.

 

She told her colleagues: "I do not want to hear the argument of national security anymore," she added. "Sorry, bugging the EU offices in Washington is a matter of 'national security'?

 

Blanket surveillance of millions of innocent citizens is a matter of 'national security'? I do not buy that anymore."

 


Via Gust MEES
Rob Duke's insight:

The goal of terrorists is not to defeat a superior force, but to cause the force to so over-react that the people become fed up and demand regime change.  The only way a just government can deal with terror is to stay the course and be a fair and just government....are we approaching that point where we over-react in the name of homeland security?

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 3, 2013 3:05 PM

 

She told her colleagues: "I do not want to hear the argument of national security anymore," she added. "Sorry, bugging the EU offices in Washington is a matter of 'national security'?


Blanket surveillance of millions of innocent citizens is a matter of 'national security'? I do not buy that anymore."


Learn more:

 

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Privacy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=NSA

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet?tag=Infographic

 

Looks like George ORWELL was right...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Brother_(Nineteen_Eighty-Four)

 

Forget PRISM, the recent NSA leaks are plain: Digital privacy doesn’t exist...

 



Kevin Bishop's comment, July 8, 2013 3:44 AM
It totally makes sense that the EU is considering taking that step. It is interesting that a different country's government is more concerned than our own about our citizens and their rights. I agree completely with the woman's statement that she does not believe that national security is a good enough reason anymore. It is not in the slightest. Losing our rights is far more dangerous and negative than the government's attempts at reducing incidents of terrorism. Orwell's 1984 is becoming more and more a reality everyday. Our government is beginning to get to the point of no return. The probability of a regime change will continue to increase unless the government back pedals.