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Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
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Inside a Mental Hospital Called Jail

Inside a Mental Hospital Called Jail | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
For some of the mentally ill, the only place to get medical treatment these days is behind bars.
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Anchorage man faces murder charge for Mountain Village death

Anchorage man faces murder charge for Mountain Village death | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A 23-year-old Anchorage man accused of killing a Mountain Village man was reportedly extremely drunk when he knocked over his alleged victim’s honey bucket and the two men began to wrestle in feces.
Rob Duke's insight:

Same old system, or Restorative Justice--Which is the more appropriate remedy for this case?

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NYPD Unions Seek 'Stop-and-Frisk' Ruling

NYPD Unions Seek 'Stop-and-Frisk' Ruling | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Police unions want the courts to decide whether a judge properly ordered changes to the program.
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New Afghan Law Disastrous for Women, Says National Geographic Photographer

New Afghan Law Disastrous for Women, Says National Geographic Photographer | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Rights groups want Afghan President Hamid Karzai to reject a law protecting perpetrators of domestic violence.
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Cruel and Unusual Punishment: The Shame of Three Strikes Laws

Cruel and Unusual Punishment: The Shame of Three Strikes Laws | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
While Wall Street crooks walk, thousands sit in California prisons for life over crimes as trivial as stealing socks
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Private Prisons

Private Prisons | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Over the past four decades, imprisonment in the United States has increased explosively, spurred by criminal laws that put more people in prison for longer sentences. At the same time, the nation has seen the rise of for-profit prison companies, which benefit from keeping more people loc...
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Down and out

Down and out | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
High-rent accommodation in Kibera DO SLUMS keep people in poverty or help them get out of it? It is an important question: about one-third of the urban population of...
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City must pay Hooper Bay family nearly $1 million for wrongful death in jail suicide

City must pay Hooper Bay family nearly $1 million for wrongful death in jail suicide | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Western Alaska community of Hooper Bay has been ordered to pay restitution to the family of Louis Bunyan, a troubled young man who killed himself in 2011 while his jailers were distracted by Facebook and computer poker.
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How A Simple New Invention Seals A Gunshot Wound In 15 Seconds

How A Simple New Invention Seals A Gunshot Wound In 15 Seconds | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An Oregon startup has developed a pocket-size device that uses tiny sponges to stop bleeding fast.
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Alysha Childs's comment, February 5, 2014 4:01 PM
Well, the visual on there was kind of super cringe-worthy. I cringed, but that's why I don't work with blood. I think that technology is amazing, and it could save so many lives. I like that they're going to be making one biodegradable so they wouldn't have to surgically remove them later on. I think it could be used for so much more than just the army, and it could help so many people! It's awesome and I'm excited for what this could become in the future!
Rob Duke's comment, February 5, 2014 4:43 PM
Yes, me too--I think law enforcement is going to be an early adopter of this technology. I carried 4 magazines and an extra taser cartridge. I'd give up belt space for one of those items to carry one of these syringes.
Ruth O'Neal's comment, February 11, 2014 1:45 AM
This story is pretty amazing. If this does come through it can be a benefit to soldiers in the battle fields and even law enforcement while in duty. It can be a life saver. It’s light weight so any one can carry one of these easily. It’s awesome that this type of technology can benefit law enforcement.
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Mainstreaming Therapeutic Jurisprudence and the Adversarial Paradigm — Incommensurability and the Possibility of a Shared Disciplinary Matrix by Nigel Stobbs :: SSRN

Mainstreaming Therapeutic Jurisprudence and the Adversarial Paradigm — Incommensurability and the Possibility of a Shared Disciplinary Matrix by Nigel Stobbs :: SSRN | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Problem-solving courts appear to achieve outcomes that are not common in mainstream courts. There are increasing calls for the adoption of more therapeutic and
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Fair Process: Managing in the Knowledge Economy

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HBR has opened this article for one weekend only...

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Stop Working - Lifeline Training - LawOfficer.com

Rob Duke's insight:

Hyperbole? Probably.  But just in case that it's not: This is bullshit!  You don't get into law enforcement to get a parade.  People don't often smile and wave--thank you's are so rare that they make us get all emotional when they are given.  If that's what you want, join the fire department.  Otherwise, get out there and work.  Fight the good fight--in the field--and in court, if necessary, but don't lie down on the job.  No one is saying that Terry v. Ohio is bad, but NYPD-style stop-and-frisk isn't about Terry stops.  Cops have a responsibility to do some due diligence and build some reasonable suspicion.  This protects us all from a future police state that wants to stop anyone for anything anytime--nobody wants that, so let's all go back to building probable cause.

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Rob Duke's comment, February 10, 2014 2:17 AM
That is all. End of rant.
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Man Fired After Employer Learns of Trespassing Misdemeanor 40 Years Ago

Man Fired After Employer Learns of Trespassing Misdemeanor 40 Years Ago | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Donel Fuller is just one out of potentially millions discriminated against because of a criminal history. But the Ban the Box campaign is changing that.
Rob Duke's insight:

Political site, but interesting question: should we do more to reintegrate ex-cons?

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David S's comment, February 16, 2014 9:58 AM
These are the kinds of things that highlight the fact that we say one thing but do something else. We want criminals to be punished for their wrong doing and pay their debt to society and they do. However, when they’re released they are still getting hit with a societal double jeopardy as they are continued to be punished for what they did. A lack of decent jobs, housing, benefits, and the person regresses into past behavior in order to survive, ends of back in jail, and we wonder what happened. Granted this is a gross generalization of the problem, but with as high a recidivism rate as we have it sure seems to fit in many cases, this one in particular.<br>This man is being denied a job because of a crime he committed 40 years ago. Really? I mean common, let’s sit down and talk about this a rationale people. If he hasn’t continued doing it that means that at least in that area he’s changed and should be given a chance. Otherwise let us be honest with ourselves and them and keep them locked up forever, but what a horrible society that would be. One without forgiveness and hope for change. We should be spending at least as much on the prisons as we do for programs that help set them up for successful reintegration into society if not more so. The primary goal of the corrections system is supposed to be change of behavior for the criminals so they don’t commit crimes anymore. As we can see, it hasn’t worked, so we need to try something new.
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NYPD experiments with Google Glass

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Shasta Pomeroy's comment, February 9, 2014 8:24 PM
In this article, it states that the NYPD are currently considering using the new Google glasses for their police work. The possible forms of use suggested within this article for the Google glasses are crime scene photos, arrest footage, videos of arrests, as well as contacting police headquarters. The use of videos and photographs are exceedingly helpful within crime scenes for forensic evidence as well as during a day of police work, the videos can also give only subjective views of evidence. Depending on lighting, angles, and sound capabilities the evidence can only be used to a certain extent when compiling evidence. Photography is essential in crime scene investigations already and therefore the Google glasses could be used to supplement this evidence. As crime scene photography is needed to be taken is several different forms such as black and white, color, zoomed out, zoomed in. And the Google glasses may not be able to take as sophisticated of photos, but can still be used as corroborating evidence. The idea of adding another form of technology to police work should definitely be considered, but should also go under scientific testing to determine it’s dependability.
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Economy and Crime Spur New Puerto Rican Exodus

Economy and Crime Spur New Puerto Rican Exodus | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Puerto Rico’s extended woes, including high unemployment and pervasive crime, are causing a worrisome exodus of professionals and middle-class residents to places like Florida and Texas.
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California begins to release prisoners after reforming its three-strikes law - ABA Journal

California begins to release prisoners after reforming its three-strikes law - ABA Journal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
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The Prison Industry in the United States: Big Business or a New Form of Slavery?

The Prison Industry in the United States: Big Business or a New Form of Slavery? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Human rights organizations, as well as political and social ones, are condemning what they are calling a new form of inhumane exploitation in the United States, where they say a prison population o...
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A CHP officer cuffed a firefighter trying to rescue accident victims

A CHP officer cuffed a firefighter trying to rescue accident victims | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A long-simmering feud between San Diego-area fire departments and police came to a head Tuesday when an officer arrested a firefighter for not moving his truck as he was trying to rescue victims from an accident.
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Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's curator insight, February 8, 2014 11:37 PM

It's law enforcement people like this CHP officer that puts a bad light on the rest of law enforcement.  Firefighters should be treated with a little bit more respect than what the rest of us get from police.  They too, put their lives on the line as first responders.  this officer needs to be reprimanded and he should apologize to the firefighter at the very least.

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Report on fatal chopper crash paints troubling picture of Alaska State Troopers' pilot safety protocol

Report on fatal chopper crash paints troubling picture of Alaska State Troopers' pilot safety protocol | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
An NTSB report on the crash that killed a well-regarded Alaska State Trooper helicopter pilot and two others in March of 2013 raises disconcerting questions about the culture of safety within the troopers' aircraft section.
Rob Duke's insight:

It's law enforcement culture versus pilot culture...

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City, Plaintiffs Reach Accord in Stop-and-Frisk | New York Law Journal

City, Plaintiffs Reach Accord in Stop-and-Frisk | New York Law Journal | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
In a complete turn-around from the dogged opposition by the former administration, Mayor Bill de Blasio said we 'accept the facts and road map laid out' in J...
Rob Duke's insight:

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner William Bratton announced an accord to settle stop-and-frisk litigation Thursday, vowing to follow through on reforming police department policies and to keep a court-appointed monitor on the job.

The announcement came at a press conference held at the Brownsville Recreation Center. In 2012, the 73rd Precinct had the highest percentage of stops per population of any precinct in the city.

De Blasio, Bratton and Corporation Counsel Zachary Carter pledged to pursue changes in stop-and-frisk policies found unconstitutional by Southern District Judge Shira Scheindlin on Feb. 14 and Aug. 12, 2013, including her decision to appoint Peter Zimroth of Arnold & Porter as a police department monitor.

In a complete turn-around from the dogged opposition to stop-and-frisk litigation by former Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, de Blasio said, we "accept the facts and road map laid out" in Scheindlin's "landmark ruling" in Floyd v. City of New York, 13-3088, including her finding that stop-and-frisk policies "unfairly targeted young African-American and Latino men."

De Blasio said the monitor would be in place for three years.

Once "the agreement is ratified" by Southern District Judge Analisa Torres, de Blasio said, the Corporation Counsel would drop its appeal of Scheindlin's rulings in Floyd and a second case over policing outside of private buildings in the Bronx.

Carter, invoking Martin Luther King, said the city was reaffirming King's commitment by ensuring that "no law-abiding citizen should fear the intrusion of law enforcement simply because of the color of their skin."

He said the next three years would be spent developing "policies, procedures and training to ensure that inappropriate considerations of race will not be a determinative factor in police decision making."

The reforms that are expected to take place include improved training and training materials, oversight of officers on the street and messages on police department policies broadcast by supervisors.

Scheindlin's rulings were stayed on Oct. 31 by a three-judge motions panel at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, which also removed her as presiding judge for giving the appearance of partiality in press interviews during trial in the Floyd case.

But it was already apparent that de Blasio, who ran against stop-and-frisk, was about to be elected mayor.

The motions panel then rejected a move by Corporation Counsel Michael Cardozo to vacate Scheindlin's rulings on Nov. 21.

The full court followed on Nov. 25 by placing the entire matter in "abeyance," including requests for en banc review by both the plaintiffs and lawyers for Scheindlin who said the motions panel was out of line for removing her from the case. The full circuit invited the parties to seek a remand for purposes of resolving the cases.

The city accepted that invitation Thursday, as Acting Corporation Counsel Jeffrey Friedlander and Assistant Corporation Counsel Deborah Brenner, filed a motion for a limited remand with the Second Circuit for 45 days "to permit the parties to explore a resolution" in Floyd and a second case, Ligon v. City of New York, 13-3123.

The police department had already begun a substantial easing back of stop-and-frisk by the time the parties were gearing up for trial in Floyd in 2013 as the quarterly statistics on the number of stop-and-frisk encounters as reported to the City Council showed a dramatic drop.

The numbers had continued to drop even as the city was arguing before a Second Circuit motions panel for a stay of Scheindlin's rulings.

The total number of stop-and-frisk reports filed by police for 2013 was about 194,000, less than one third the encounters reported by police during the peak of the program. There were 694,000 encounters in 2011 and 532,911 in 2012.

By the middle of January, Bratton said, "The problem has been more-or-less solved" and de Blasio said reform was underway.

Bratton addressed one question yesterday on an idea raised by Scheindlin during Floyd and included in her remedial order—a pilot program in which officers in one precinct per borough would wear body cameras to record police encounters for one year.

Bratton said, "American policing is moving very quickly in that direction."

Vincent Warren, executive director for the Center for Constitutional Rights, whose lawyers served as co-counsel in Floyd, said the agreement marked "a significant day in the fight for accountability" and "the legal questions have now been settled."

Donna Lieberman, direcor of the New York Civil Liberties Union, whose lawyers led the way in Ligon, said "We all know that change starts with the message from the top" and "we believe in the good will and good intentions of the new administration."

Two separate groups of police unions moved to intervene in the appeal in September in the hopes of carrying the appeal forward should a new administration elect to pull the plug.

Their motions were also held in abeyance by the full court. Thursday, the circuit issued an order asking that they submit their views on the consent remand by Feb.7, with the parties in the case to reply by Feb. 14.



Read more: http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=1202640751616/City%2C-Plaintiffs-Reach-Accord-in-Stop-and-Frisk#ixzz2sJi3CXhm

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Video showing cop forcibly cutting woman's hair weave makes waves

Video showing cop forcibly cutting woman's hair weave makes waves | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Disturbing new video showing a Michigan police officer hacking off the hair weave of a young woman arrested in November is stirring controversy on social media. In the video, Charda Gregory, 23, of Detroit is tied in a restraining chair by four officers in Warren, Mich., before  …
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