Police Problems and Policy
10.6K views | +1 today
Follow
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

4 Stresses Law Enforcement Officers Deal With That Non-Law Enforcement Officers Should Know About

4 Stresses Law Enforcement Officers Deal With That Non-Law Enforcement Officers Should Know About | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
People die every day. Accidents happen every day. In rare instances, a dramatic tragedy unexpectedly takes the lives of one or thousands. However, in general, most occupations involve a generally safe assumption that you will go to work and come home at the end of the day. Being a police officer requires that you prepare daily for death. We put on bullet proof vests and carry guns for a reason: we are ready for the fight, and unfortunately not every warrior comes home. Taking just the last 5 years of line-of-duty deaths into account, a police officer is killed in action every 2-3 days. To put that in perspective, that is 727 lives lost of men and women who gave all to serve others. Cops are at war out there. The Norman Rockwell vision of a police officer cannot always apply. A heart that desires to help others is a pre-requisite for this job, but a mind sharp and ready to defend is of equal necessity.

In one sense, we must relegate this reality into a part of our mind that permits us to be effective in continuing to move on and do our job with professionalism and self-sacrifice. In another sense, in order to be ready for the fight, we must remind ourselves daily that we are in it. In doing so, we’re better able to love our spouses, hug our kids more and help our friends however we can in this life.
more...
Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, October 31, 2015 3:30 PM
One officer killed every 2-3 days- that has got to hit hard and stay with you. That alone has got to effect how you do your job, let alone how your family deals. Sadly, in our society right now some people would actually be happy to see that statistic. It's disgusting. Yes, there are issues in the system- issues that need to be addressed; HOWEVER, these officers risk their lives everyday to protect and serve (even communities that don't want them).
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Why black woman is joining Los Angeles Police Dept. - CNN.com

Why black woman is joining Los Angeles Police Dept. - CNN.com | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
At a time when many African-Americans are frustrated with police, Asia Hardy is bucking the trend -- and joining their forces to help change perceptions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Video Shows Cop Rip Female Student Out of Desk in South Carolina Classroom | VICE News

A school district in South Carolina has opened an investigation into footage that appears to show a campus cop manhandling a student.
Rob Duke's insight:

So, let's examine what cops do when someone refuses lawful commands: 

Shoot the person? No, that's too harsh.

Say: "Oh, well. I tried."

Both of these are ridiculous in their extremes, but what's left for the officer.  Plead with her?

I'm not sure I agree with the video, but there's not enough context to know what she's done that warranted the officer being called.  Remember, it's not like we say: "hmm, I think I'll stop in this classroom and beat somebody up..."  No, officers get called because of something the suspect is doing.  How do we react if the parties want to exercise their rights to have the person removed and the person refuses?  Whose rights prevail?


This is the pressing question of the day: How do we deal with those who won't obey lawful orders?  How do we decide in cases of competing rights?

more...
Lorraine Stewart's comment, October 27, 2015 1:22 PM
Truth is...we really don't know that she was being a peaceful female. By the looks of the administrators standing there, I'm guessing she was acting inappropriately before the camera was turned on...so much so that the school officer had to respond. I have raised teenagers...she is putting on quite a show. She should be following the instructions of her teacher, the administrators, and the school officer, but instead she is being disobedient. She was asked to leave and now the officer must remove her from the premises with the least amount of force necessary. I'd say he acted appropriately and used a reasonable level of force. Unfortunately, her behavior instigating this issue will probably not be addressed nearly as much as the officers behavior will be scrutinized. Let's be honest people...how many of us acted a bit rebellious against authority at that age.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Quentin Tarantino, protesters rally against police brutality in NY days after cop shooting

Quentin Tarantino, protesters rally against police brutality in NY days after cop shooting | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Academy Award-winning filmmaker Quentin Tarantino joined hundreds of demonstrators waving signs, shouting through megaphones and marching along the city's streets on Saturday to protest police brutality nationwide.
Rob Duke's insight:

This dumbass has gloried murder and violence his entire career.

more...
Laura Lee Smith's comment, October 26, 2015 5:10 PM
EXACTLY! Don't claim you're against violence when you've used it to make yourself a millionaire. You profit from it the same as individuals who collect a salary while they employ violence.
Rob Duke's comment, October 26, 2015 5:18 PM
My point exactly: hypocrite!
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Sovereign citizen training for LE

Sovereign citizen training for LE | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A Fla. sheriff's office has released a video on sovereign citizens and how to safely police them.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is worth watching...

 

1. Disconnect;

2. Call for backup and a supervisor;

3. Document every encounter; and, share those with surrounding law enforcement.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Mets to wear NYPD caps to honor slain police officer Brian Moore

Mets to wear NYPD caps to honor slain police officer Brian Moore | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The team also recently paid tribute to fallen officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Federal judge holds first hearing on progress of Portland police reforms

Federal judge holds first hearing on progress of Portland police reforms | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Much talk revolved around the controversial rule that allows officers involved in shootings to wait at least two days before they're interviewed by investigators. The judge pressed for a timeline on when the Police Bureau plans to equip officers with body cameras, and asked about officer response to mental health-related calls.
Rob Duke's insight:

It's always ironic to me that the Feds are the watchdogs over city departments.  Some of the scandals that come out on the Feds are much worse than the petty traffic stops and ped stops that are the subject of this type of Fed oversight (e.g. FBI infiltration of religious groups, DEA and BATF selling guns to narco-traffickers, sexual escapades of the secret service, Ruby Ridge, Waco...need I go on?)

Local agencies are very sensitive to Art.I Sec. 42 U.S.C. Sec. 1983 civil rights suits.  You won't remain chief long if you can't control multi-million dollar suits, but the Feds just print more money (that's a joke, but more than once I've heard a Federal agent say those exact words).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

F.B.I. Chief Links Scrutiny of Police With Rise in Violent Crime

F.B.I. Chief Links Scrutiny of Police With Rise in Violent Crime | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
James B. Comey, the F.B.I. director, said he had a “strong sense” that scrutiny of the police has made officers less aggressive and emboldened criminals.
Rob Duke's insight:

Look for a call for his resignation soon.  This is a major break with the President's policies.

 

This isn't completely baseless based upon economic theory.  For Instance, Ron Coase suggests in the Coase Theorem that the Institutional arrangements aren't particularly important because markets work out the most efficient way to work within those rules.  If you give ownership to elephant ranchers, they manage elephants on their land to sustain supply (though they might choose to harvest some ivory), but if you put ownership with the state and yet don't have enough game wardens to protect elephants, the Black Market will push elephant populations to extinction.  India's religious taboo against killing elephants is another example where an "ownership" was given to a particular institution or group and the market finds a way to operate.  We, therefore, must continually be on the lookout for more efficient institutions.

In the last 20 years, we had given the power to stop and frisk to the police and had experienced some good years in terms of reduced crime; but, with ownership shifted back to individual rights, many criminals are using this new institutional arrangement to engage in more crime.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Slain cop's mom blasts city over stop-and-frisk restrictions

Slain cop's mom blasts city over stop-and-frisk restrictions | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Outrage over the latest killing of a police officer has caused both the family of the slain officer and even one of the city’s liberal lawmakers to question whether limits on stop-and-frisk have emboldened criminals to declare war on cops.
“I think Mayor [Bill] de Blasio should reconsider this stop-and-frisk because I think it’s gonna be a deterrent to these thugs who go around taking innocent people’s lives,” Princess Holder, the grieving mother of Officer Randolph Holder, told FOX5NY Wednesday.
more...
Laura Lee Smith's comment, October 26, 2015 5:13 PM
My question here is, would you like to be stopped and frisked simply because you live in a horrible neighborhood and have the wrong skin color? Some rights need to be respected
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

San Jose police officer fired for combative tweets on Black Lives Matter

San Jose police officer fired for combative tweets on Black Lives Matter | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A San Jose police officer who drew national scorn in December for an array of combative tweets antagonizing the Black Lives Matter movement -- including some widely viewed as violent threats -- has been fired by the San Jose Police Department, this newspaper has learned.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is an opportunity lost to model some Restorative Justice.  Was his frustration at perceived attacks on police really so destructive that he deserved the career death penalty?  He's already been a staunch contributor to his community, think of the opportunity here to meet with social justice leaders in a circle, where both sides could express their frustrations, and both sides leaving with a plan to restore justice and clarify their future intentions.  You can bet he has nothing good to say about any of this now, but imagine what kind of raving fans would be created with the other approach.

more...
Lorraine Stewart's comment, October 27, 2015 5:26 PM
I find this particular article very interesting. While I agree that Officer White should not have posted such threatening and instigating comments in a public forum, I think the issue runs a bit deeper. Though I am not a police officer, I am sure they are feeling a tremendous amount of stress related to the various force-related cases across the U.S. Officers are increasingly becoming targets for violence as a result of public outrage related to these recent events. Additionally, I can only imagine the impact such increased public scrutiny can have on someone’s mental state. What kind of support are officers receiving to help with the increased tensions they are facing on the streets every day? This officer spent two decades as an officer serving that community. It appears he had already been reprimanded for similar acts just prior to this incident, but there is no mention of counseling or other support services required as a result of the previous incidents. Officer White’s peers also acknowledged that this seemed out of character for him. It seems to me that Officer White had, or was beginning to have, a breakdown. It’s too bad that he had to lose everything for that momentary lapse of judgment, which I suspect could’ve been prevented.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Suspected DUI driver killed by L.A. sheriff's deputy following chase

Suspected DUI driver killed by L.A. sheriff's deputy following chase | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A fleeing motorist who allegedly tried to run over a Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputy after being boxed in a cul-de-sac was shot by the deputy and died, authorities said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Does poetry hold the key to highly secure passwords?

Does poetry hold the key to highly secure passwords? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Two USC Viterbi computational linguists use a method that takes more than 11 years to break.
Rob Duke's insight:

Excerpt: Here’s how what Knight and Ghazvininejad call the “Poetry Method” works. Their program starts with a 32,000-word dictionary. Each entry is assigned a unique 15-bit code represented by 0s and 1s. The computer program then randomly creates a string of 60 0s and 1s and fits the words to it like a jigsaw puzzle. It chooses two words that rhyme and places them at the end of two very short sentences. The end product is a 16-syllable password that looks like this:

Sophisticated potentates
misrepresenting Emirates.

Or this:

The supervisor notified
the transportation nationwide.

Because they are randomly generated, these passwords can withstand modern hackers. Meter and rhyme make the randomness memorable.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Federal Ruling Protects Medical Marijuana Dispensaries That Follow State Law | Drug Policy Alliance

Federal Ruling Protects Medical Marijuana Dispensaries That Follow State Law | Drug Policy Alliance | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Yesterday, a federal judge lifted an injunction against one of California’s oldest medical marijuana dispensaries. The injunction can no longer be enforced in the wake of a congressional spending amendment passed by Congress last year—the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment—that precluded the Department of Justice from spending funds on prosecuting dispensaries in compliance with state law. Setting significant legal precedent, Senior Judge Charles R. Breyer of the U.S. District Court for Northern California ruled that as long as the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment is in effect, the injunction against and the prosecution of Marin Alliance for Medical Marijuana and its founder Lynette Shaw may only be enforced if they are in violation of California state law.

“This court decision makes clear that the Justice Department is not above the law and must leave legal state medical marijuana dispensaries alone,” said Bill Piper, director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance. “Cancer, MS, AIDS and other medical marijuana patients can sleep a little easier tonight knowing that a federal judge will protect them and the people providing them their medicine.”
more...
Peter Krieger's comment, October 20, 2015 11:41 PM
I know that the whole marijuana and medical marijuana topic is one of highly controversy. For me I don’t see the purpose to legalize it for non-medical purposes. With that being said I do feel that if there is an actual medical use to continue to work with that and find a happy medium like it seems they had done in California.
Rob Duke's comment, October 21, 2015 1:38 AM
I had an unusual experience with medical mj. A prominent family in my town came to me when the family matriarch had a stroke. They wanted to try medicinal mj, but didn't want to offend me as the Chief of Police. Cali had adopted Prop. 215 so I felt like it was a non-issue, but wasn't particularly leaning one way or the other. I watched from afar as the matriarch had a marked improvement in quality of life as a result of taking mj. It was funny because when my wife was diagnosed with cancer, this family brought over some baked consumables. That brought the issue "home" literally for us and I did feel like I'd need to resign my commission if my wife decided to try mj. She ultimately decided that it wasn't for her. I'm a supporter of it now, but I have the benefit of no longer being in the biz.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Group may be planning Halloween ambush, FBI reportedly tells police

The Federal Bureau of Investigation reportedly released and alert Monday that warned police departments across the country about an anarchist group that says it is planning to use to holiday to ambush police.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

On duty, under fire

On duty, under fire | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Snyder soon realized he was being followed. Outside the Pick ’n Save grocery store, he abruptly turned his car around. He raised his semiautomatic pistol and opened fire, striking Casper in the neck.

Snyder and Casper jumped out of their cars while they were still rolling. The 21-year-old trooper, armed with a .40-caliber Glock, and the 38-year-old bank robber circled the cruiser, guns blazing. Casper fired 12 rounds; Snyder got off nine armor-piercing bullets, one of which penetrated Casper’s ballistic vest. And when it was over, Snyder lay dying of a gunshot wound to his back.

“Bad guy is down,” a dispatcher reported.

Casper collapsed and then dropped his gun. March 24 was his first solo day on the job — and his last. Shot three times, he became the youngest law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty in Wisconsin history. Casper is among 31 officers this year who have been shot to death by perpetrators, according to the Officer Down Memorial Page. He was hailed as a hero for stopping Snyder, who had magazines of ammunition tucked in his socks and left a manifesto promising “to go down fighting hard.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Baltimore police officer retires as officials consider discipline

Baltimore police officer retires as officials consider discipline | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A 23-year veteran of the Baltimore Police Department retired this month, as officials considered whether to discipline him for a 2012 incident involving a handcuffed suspect, a police spokesman said.
more...
Laura Lee Smith's comment, October 26, 2015 5:09 PM
My question is why does this take SO LONG
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Citizen Patrol

Citizen Patrol | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Tape I made to train citizen to be eyes and ears. How to report crime
Rob Duke's insight:

We started this in Redlands in 1987.  We used ours for patrol, clerical, non-emergency call takers, auto-repair, station maintenance, crime analysis, now-sworn investigator assistants.  Most jurisdictions under-utilize the CVP's.

more...
eamoe's comment, November 1, 2015 11:42 PM
Well citizen patrol is all well and good....however, in Alaska there are over 20 militias that feel the need to exist...why I have no idea...but that can be dangerous to society and I sense those in Alaska would take matters in their own hands and try to run rough shot over officials...if they can start an offshoot of the CCC in Alaska that can take the citizens and veterans and let them train them on 'community safety' and work in conjunction with the AST and police stations to make sure information is reported properly and processed...and if anything creative arises from a citizen trying to do their 'duty' then a veteran is a call away and that can assist the citizen of dangers... Most of them up here will 'take it head on' and end up dead!
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Professor Dr Robot QC

Professor Dr Robot QC | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Once regarded as safe havens, the professions are now in the eye of the storm
Rob Duke's insight:

This would be great for cops.  Lawyer in a pocket: I can't give legal advice, but Siri can....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Good Cop - YouTube

The Good Cop aims to cultivate a community that commends law enforcement professionals who do a great job. We hope that, with your help, we can foster more c...
Rob Duke's insight:

Creating community capacity to care for themselves....that's what we do!  We're there to catch folks when they fail, but we put them back on their feet.  We're doing our job if they say: "we could have done that on our own...."  Our happiest day will be when they lay us off because we are no longer needed.  Like Cincinnatus, we just want to go back and take care of our farms.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Majority of Portland police officers don't think bureau holds poor-performing cops accountable, survey finds

Majority of Portland police officers don't think bureau holds poor-performing cops accountable, survey finds | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Community members aren't the only ones who have little faith in the Portland Police Bureau's discipline system.

More than half, or 62 percent, of Portland police officers surveyed in the spring believe the bureau's discipline process is unfair. A majority – or 86 percent -- don't believe the bureau holds officers accountable when they're doing a consistently poor job.

The survey also found general agreement that officers aren't treated with respect during internal investigations and that they don't get coaching or counseling for minor mistakes, but instead get punished.
more...
Laura Lee Smith's comment, October 26, 2015 5:12 PM
I am glad they agree there is a problem and sad it takes so long for agencies to rectify this situation.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Appeals court says American can't sue FBI over abuse claims

Appeals court says American can't sue FBI over abuse claims | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A U.S. citizen who claims American officials falsely imprisoned and tortured him for several months in Africa can't sue the FBI agents involved because the conduct took place overseas...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The LAPD body worn camera program, Part 2: When will officers record?

The LAPD body worn camera program, Part 2: When will officers record? | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
This is a continuation of a series about the implementation of a body camera program for the Los Angeles Police Department. Part 1 is here.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

BPD: Officer accused of tickling corpse no longer with Bakersfield Police Department

BPD: Officer accused of tickling corpse no longer with Bakersfield Police Department | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
If Stringer was terminated for cause by the Bakersfield Police Department and did not get a golden parachute or sweetheart buyout the BPD finally got something right. Unfortunately the more likely reason is that Stringer could no longer testify in court since the Prosecution would always be required to disclose his issues. Nonetheless, the secret removal of one BPD cop, who manipulated and played with the dead body of James DeLarosa, does not solve the structural and institutional problems with this Department, and brings little solace to the DeLarosa family whose unarmed son was shot and killed and still have no answers from BPD.The fundamental issues involving the lack of training, the improper use of force, and the manipulation of evidence by BPD must be fixed to restore order and confidence in the police department.
Rob Duke's insight:

Hyperbole much? This was terribly insensitve, but e.r.'s, morgues, operating rooms, and police stations are filled with graveyard humor--and, it's been well-documented that these behaviors are important to the mental health of these workers.

 

more...
Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, October 21, 2015 2:26 AM

Tickle the dead the police get fired kill the living unjustly they get a pat on the back if that and good old boy cone tioo jail time if any with pension and perks and or the good old boy Jim crow connection works, now that speaks for itself where the true concerns and care of the rights of some that is alive is because even crimes. against the dead/ corpse is punished more harshly than those against the living with colorbor not

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Georgetown Shops Drop App to Discuss 'Suspicious' Shoppers

Georgetown Shops Drop App to Discuss 'Suspicious' Shoppers | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Georgetown retailers will no longer use an app to report people they suspect of shoplifting or otherwise deem suspicious, after a recent Washington Post article raised concerns that the app was leading to racial...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Homan Square: an interactive portrait of detainees at Chicago's police facility

Homan Square: an interactive portrait of detainees at Chicago's police facility | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Internal data shows staggeringly disproportionate arrest records from the city’s off-the-books warehouse. Go inside the numbers – and across Chicago
Rob Duke's insight:

Nefarious plot or just a cheap booking facility?

more...
No comment yet.