Police Problems and Policy
10.4K views | +21 today
Follow
Police Problems and Policy
Examining the possibilities of abuse of power without the constraint of New Public Administration.
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Ex-L.A. County sheriff's sergeant sentenced to 8 years in prison in jail visitor beating

Ex-L.A. County sheriff's sergeant sentenced to 8 years in prison in jail visitor beating | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Former Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Sgt. Eric Gonzalez made a final, defiant stand Monday as a judge prepared to sentence him in the beating of a handcuffed man and a scheme to cover it up.
more...
Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, November 10, 2015 10:08 PM
When I read stuff like this, it makes me believe that our justice system will always be corrupt. I am glad that this police officer is not getting away for beating Carrillo. As big of a deal this case was, I am surprised that Carrillo got $1.2 million to settle a civil lawsuit. That is a lot of money for one person, but I guess he did suffer a broken nose and bruises and cuts all over him. It just seems so inhumane for a police officer to beat someone up, especially someone who doesn’t deserve it.
Peter Krieger's comment, November 15, 2015 12:27 AM
Wow. Kind of at a lost for words after reading that article. It is crazy to see how violent people can be and it goes back to the abuse of power and how people can abuse their power especially in this situation where they tried to cover it up to get off with a lessor sentence. It is very unfortunate that situations like this have to happen because it creates such a bad image on the law enforcement not only in that county but also in the state, and country. Hopefully going forward, knowing the FBI’s involvement in these cases for extreme violence, we will see a decline in these scenarios knowing how this case turned out and the judges thoughts on the deputy’s actions.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, November 20, 2015 5:29 PM
Disgusting situation that just reinforces beliefs about oficer's and the justice system
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Oklahoma City Local News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KOKH

Oklahoma City Local News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KOKH | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Sand Springs Police Department has released an officer's body camera footage following a stolen car pursuit last week.The Sand Springs Police Department says they received a call around 12:15 pm Nov. 6 about a woman stealing a vehicle. Sand Springs Pol
Rob Duke's insight:

Could this have been avoided? Maybe, but who has the crystal ball?  In pursuits you never know where the bad guys are going to turn, turn around, bail out, etc.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Local agencies differ on how to handle police-inovled shooting cases

Local agencies differ on how to handle police-inovled shooting cases | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
More than 130 law enforcement agencies in Florida, including ASO, have memorandums of understanding with FDLE to allow it to conduct independent investigations of incidents where officers use deadly force, said Capt. Stephen Maynard, chief inspector of ASO’s Office of Professional Standards.

Maynard said his division does conduct administrative investigations into deadly force cases to look for policy violations, but those stay separate from FDLE’s criminal investigations.
more...
Peter Krieger's comment, November 15, 2015 12:35 AM
This I felt was a very worthwhile article to read. I think that it is very important when dealing with cases with use of deadly force to have a system or policy in place to determine if the force was necessary and if any policies or rules were broken. I feel that there are a couple different ways of handling these situations and it seems each force has their own manor in which they prefer to carry them out. I personally if given the power to decide would mandate not only a self assessment aka in house but also but a neutral third party to try and settle and speculations from the public.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Texas AG Opinion: Law Enforcement can put "In God We Trust" on patrol cars

Texas AG Opinion: Law Enforcement can put "In God We Trust" on patrol cars | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The Attorney General of Texas, Ken Paxton, issued an opinion this week that law enforcement agencies can display the phrase “In God We Trust” on their patrol vehicles because it is protected by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.
Rob Duke's insight:

It's on our money--can it be on police cars?

more...
Courtney Antilla's comment, November 15, 2015 11:19 PM
I have seen the phrase "In God we trust" for long as I can remember and I have never seen it at church. When I see that I have many patriotic associations with it. I personally like having our American motto on the police cars. To me it makes the police more for the people.
William Estrin's comment, November 16, 2015 1:16 AM
I saw this story on Facebook a while back. I'm torn because I'm both an atheist and a conservative. However, I am against this. I do believe in the separation of church and state. In America, we have freedom of religious and that includes the choice not to believe at all. Putting "In God we trust" is offensive because it is also speaking for the people who do not believe in God. I believe this is an abuse of power and the police chief is basically using his own personal beliefs and position of power to basically say, "Hey I have power! Look what I can do!" Not surprising this happened in Texas, considering how ultra conservative they are. You would never see this in an ultra liberal state like New York!
Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, November 18, 2015 2:01 AM
I think it is interesting for police cars to have “In God We Trust” on the back of them. Our nation is built off of many religions that I do not personally think it is appropriate that they have that on the back of their police vehicles. This is claimed to be the official motto of the United States for nearly 60 years, but I think times have changed and people are way too sensitive to the many different religions. I personally do not think it is smart for them to be putting this on their cars because they are just making themselves a target for people that do not believe in the same God.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Tribute to law enforcement- Bad Company - YouTube

This video was uploaded from an Android phone.
Rob Duke's insight:

We gotta stop calling ourselves the largest street gang in the world.  We're not a gang--we're farmers, craftsmen, and priests.  These professions build capacity and help their fellow humankind--that's the type of profession we should aspire to represent.

more...
Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, November 9, 2015 8:06 PM
Great song...but not sure I like it in this context. Fitting considering recent events, but this is not something to be celebrated. It would kind of be like playing "Wanted Dead or Alive" by Bon Jovi, or "Another One Bites the Dust". Not really appropriate, but I guess that is the point.
Rob Duke's comment, November 9, 2015 11:23 PM
Yeah, I like Steely Dan's "Do it Again" also as a better fit for the context: "you find the hangman isn't hanging so they kick you out the door...and, it's back, Jack, do it again...."
Rob Duke's comment, November 9, 2015 11:27 PM
...I know I dated myself with the Steely Dan reference, so here's the link: http://it.musicplayon.com/play?v=244544
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

What Really Happens When Companies Nix Performance Ratings

What Really Happens When Companies Nix Performance Ratings | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Regular conversations between managers and employees become more important.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. Frequency of manager-employee communication increases dramatically: this would be a very good thing in the police service.  Nothing makes people step up more than telling them what you need and then trusting them to do it.  But communication is key to being able to allow that kind of freedom--it's difficult to do policing "right" without that freedom and discretion.

2. Administrative burden is significantly reduced: See point 1 above.  It's always been my experience that when you treat employees and highly valued and skilled adults, they rise to the occasion.

3. Those conversations that you do have focus on goals, growth and development.

4. It's difficult to point to one best practice.

5. It's still necessary to keep pay-for-performance: I used PFP and found it to work well in policing.  However, now I think that I'd combine PFP with a Balanced-Scorecard method of evaluation.

6. Well-designed change management is essential: this is both an art and a science.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Caught On Video: 4 Armed Burglars Target Homes In Highland

Deputies sought the public's help Thursday to identify four burglary suspects who targeted at least two homes in the City of Highland.
Rob Duke's insight:

These, too, are high school kids, but up to some very adult behaviors....

more...
Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, November 10, 2015 10:32 PM
Watching the burglars on the home’s security camera was terrifying, I would not know what to do if I was the victim they saw in the home. I think if I heard someone breaking into my house, I would go hide and call the police because I always have my phone on me. I think it would be so scary to get broken into, especially because these guys had a gun on them.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How police can get your deleted texts

Investigators were able to access those texts using a new kind of software that is having a big impact on law enforcement.
more...
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, November 6, 2015 6:59 PM

Well that is a little freightening.... There are definitely things on my cell phone I would not want my family to see. Nothing illegal or that would be deemed as such, but there are things on there that I would prefer people not see unless I had shown them. This is probably true for most everybody I would assume. This technology though is going to completely turn around policing in that it has the potential to bring new insights into cases as well as new techniques to investigating crimes. Keep your cell phones on lock people...

Brittney Menzel's comment, November 7, 2015 2:10 AM
Dang, that is crazy! I'm not surprised this can be done now. Technology has really bounded. While I do think this is a good thing, I'm sure it won't always be used properly.
William Estrin's comment, November 16, 2015 1:19 AM
This doesn't surprise me at all. There is no such thing as "deleting" something when it comes to social media, the internet, or texting. It's always on file somewhere. A couple of rules I follow when texting or being on social media is number 1, don't post something that you wouldn't want plastered on the front page of the newspaper, and number 2, don't post something that you wouldn't want the FBI to read. All too often, people are naive and think that what they are doing is totally private when in fact nothing could be further from the truth.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police: Boy killed after marshals shoot at fleeing vehicle

Mayeux said city marshals were chasing Few after he fled an attempt to serve a warrant. The coroner said Few reached a dead end and was backing into the marshals when they fired. The coroner said the boy was "caught in the line of fire" and was killed.
Rob Duke's insight:

It wasn't exactly fleeing when they shot....this one will probably stand despite the utter tragedy of shooting a boy....

more...
Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, November 6, 2015 6:51 PM
This is a very sad and unfortunate story and it is terrible that the young boy. I can imagine the guilt that the officers feel from being the accidental cause of death to a young boy. I believe that ultimately it is also the father's fault and that he is more to blame for his son's death than the officers are. The officers did what they have been trained to do and responded in the appropriate way.
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, November 6, 2015 6:51 PM

This is a very sad and unfortunate story and it is terrible that the young boy. I can imagine the guilt that the officers feel from being the accidental cause of death to a young boy. I believe that ultimately it is also the father's fault and that he is more to blame for his son's death than the officers are. The officers did what they have been trained to do and responded in the appropriate way.

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:59 AM

We all have an opinion after the fact but not one person can bring this child back to life. There was a time when I knew someone that no matter happened to at the hands of certain people to certain children it was alright it was their parents fault if not their own. Then this person had a nephew that was murdered at a young age and that person forgot all about the fault supposing to be the child or parent and because of who the person was so much hell was raised and favors called in for just that one child and nobody said a word about the child or parent because they knew they would be dealt with , but not all have it like that but that person when the murdered boy was one of his realities said it was OK. Just saying if it was your child murdered by the police and did nothing wrong what would you say then?  Then consider your words because you can have what you say.

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Indiana officer's suspension spotlights police departments' social media policies

The decision by a city police department in Indiana to suspend one of its officers over a political posting on Facebook is bringing scrutiny to the complicated issue of crafting social media policy for public employees.
The disciplinary action taken against Terre Haute, Indiana Police Department (THPD) Lt. Gary Shook, who was suspended for two days without pay, is a matter scheduled to go before a police merit board on Nov. 18.
Shook’s attorney, Joe Etling, told the Terre Haute Tribune-Star that he believes Shook’s posting about the local mayor’s race on his personal Facebook page is protected freedom of speech.
more...
Brittney Menzel's comment, November 7, 2015 2:17 AM
First, politics! Second, if you work for a certain company, group, branch, field, you often have to follow certain rules. Rules will vary depending on the company or the type of work and the boss. There are very many rules to follow while in the military. When you join, you are made to understand that your life will be different and isn't really yours anymore. I'm sure the police field is very similar. When you decide to be a police officer, there are certain rules and ways of life to abide by. Pretty simple. Freedom isn't free.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police arrest cop, accuse him of lying about being shot

Authorities in Arkansas now believe that the incident, which sparked a manhunt, never happened.
Rob Duke's insight:

Munchhausen by officer: it's not common, but it's very real.  Usually the officer experiences a family loss and thinks that they can create sympathy and hold onto the relationship that is crumbling.  It can also be triggered by officers feeling like they can't be accepted in the warrior culture any other way than to have "proven" they can perform in battle.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Student n Cop fight - YouTube

Rob Duke's insight:

Here's another one that's not getting as much national attention...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Ohio voters soundly reject marijuana legalization initiative

Ohio voters soundly reject marijuana legalization initiative | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Four other states, including Alaska, and the District of Columbia have already legalized the recreational sale of marijuana, which is still a federal crime. Ohio would have been the first state in the Midwest to do so.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How To Tell Good Studies From Bad? Bet On Them

How To Tell Good Studies From Bad? Bet On Them | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A few years ago, psychologist Brian Nosek and two graduate students, Jeffrey Spies and Matt Motyl, conducted an experiment that measured people’s ability to differentiate shades of gray across a gr…
Rob Duke's insight:

Excerpt:

With a p-value that low, the result hardly screamed “false positive” like a barely significant one of, say, 0.05 might, but they decided to take the unusual step of repeating the experiment while they wrote up the study for publication. They’d been thinking about the issue of reproducibility (the question of whether scientific results will stand up to further studies), and their methodology allowed them to easily collect data online. In the second trial, the results evaporated, and the researchers published the experience as a cautionary tale. Nosek and Spies went on to found the Center for Open Science to promote transparency and reproducibility in science.


Solution?


Force researchers to bet money on the outcome and repeatability.


This adds a Baysian element to otherwise standard Fisher-style statistical models.

more...
Rob Duke's curator insight, November 9, 2015 11:25 PM

Have a group of professors peer review and then bet on whether the studies results can be reproduced; then, match the bet results with actual reproductions.  Use standard peer-review as the control group.  It ends up that the wager model is more accurate.

Courtney Antilla's comment, November 15, 2015 11:15 PM
I find this fascinating. Makes people really look at how good of a study they are conducting.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Idaho rancher’s wife: ‘I saw them murder my husband’

Idaho rancher’s wife: ‘I saw them murder my husband’ | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
The family of an Adams County rancher involved in an encounter with two sheriff’s deputies says the deputies killed him in a “completely unjustified” shooting.

Survivors of Jack Yantis, the 62-year-old who died a week ago in the darkness on U.S. 95 north of Council, say they will pursue claims against Adams County for Yantis’ death.


Donna Yantis spent her 63rd birthday Thursday at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where she has been recovering from a heart attack she suffered after her husband was killed. Provided by the Yantis family
Family members have shared with the Statesman their account of what happened last Sunday night. The account is in written statements prepared with attorneys the family hired after the incident, a video statement Donna Yantis made from her Boise hospital bed, and a draft transcript the lawyers prepared of one family member’s account of what happened.

The Statesman also interviewed several family members, including Rowdy Paradis, a nephew of the couple’s who said he witnessed the shootings.

“Law enforcement should be trained to de-escalate situations,” said Rowdy Paradis. “In this case, I stood 10 feet away and watched two deputies escalate the situation and needlessly kill a man.”
more...
Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, November 9, 2015 8:00 PM
It is hard to tell what actually happened as this article was biased towards the family. I would like to hear what the local authorities have to say. Going off of what the family said, though, this does sound senseless. I don't really understand why the local deputies started to open fire (and were such alarmingly poor shots according to the family) unless the bull presented an immediate threat. I also do not understand why they would act that way towards a senior aged man who was called to the scene to handle it. Again, I would like to hear the other side before making any final conclusions, but going on the just what the family said this does not seem right.
Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, November 10, 2015 10:25 PM
I cannot believe that the officers shot Yantis. The fact that they didn’t even want to check on him. Then the fact that they handcuffed the rest of them was shocking as well, this is just another example of police officers abusing their power, thinking that they can get away with anything. I am glad that the Yantis family is fighting this because this isn’t right at all, especially if what they say is true.
Rob Duke's comment, November 15, 2015 3:19 AM
Yeah, I agree the story is "fishy"....
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Former Athens hero cop loses bid in federal court to get job back

Louis Pasqualetti once was hailed as a hero for saving the life of a man facing a potentially fatal stabbing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Louisiana police arrest 2 officers in boy's shooting death

Louisiana police arrest 2 officers in boy's shooting death | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Three days after a 6-year-old autistic boy was killed and his father wounded after marshals opened fire on their vehicle in a Louisiana town, authorities have arrested two of the four officers involved in the shooting. ,
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Fraternal Order of Police Promises An Ominous-Sounding ‘Surprise’ for Quentin Tarantino

Fraternal Order of Police Promises An Ominous-Sounding ‘Surprise’ for Quentin Tarantino | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Fraternal Order of Police is saying that their participation in the Quentin Tarantino film boycott will not be the only "surprise" they've got up their sleeve
Rob Duke's insight:

This is just dumb.  You can't win fans to police by acting churlish (thanks to my Oxford trained high school English teacher for that word).  Look at history here: did our boycott of Ice-T's "Copkiller" ruin Ice-T's career?  How about when NWA released "FTP"?  No dice.  This is real life and cultural moments are fraught with hyperbole.  Just deal with it.  The boycott approach will make Tarantino's career longer and more profitable.  Just let it lie.  But, that's just my opinion and I could be full of it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Police Emails About Ahmed Mohamed: 'This Is What Happens When We Screw Up'

Police Emails About Ahmed Mohamed: 'This Is What Happens When We Screw Up' | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Motherboard has obtained 280 pages of internal emails the Irving Police Department sent about Ahmed Mohamed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Detective: 'Hero' cop sought hit-man to cover up thefts : News

Detective: 'Hero' cop sought hit-man to cover up thefts : News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
Months before an Illinois police officer staged his suicide to make it seem like he died in the line of duty, subjecting his community to an expensive and fruitless manhunt, he apparently sought a hit man to kill a village administrator he feared would expose him as a thief, a detective told The Associated Press on Thursday.

Det. Chris Covelli said Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz sent a text in April asking a woman to set up a meeting with a "high ranking gang member to put a hit on the village manager."

Gliniewicz sent another message in May saying he had thought of "planting things," which made more sense after investigators found small packages of cocaine in Gliniewicz's desk after he died, Covelli said.

The drugs were "not linked to any case that we could find," raising the possibility that the lieutenant sought to frame the manager, Anne Marrin, as a drug criminal before she could expose him as an embezzler, the detective said.

"We never found any explanation why those drugs were in his desk at the police station," Covelli said.

Gliniewicz sent the texts after Marrin, the village's first professional administrator, began auditing Fox Lake's finances, including the Police Explorers program that authorities now say the lieutenant had been stealing from for seven years.
more...
Brittney Menzel's comment, November 7, 2015 2:05 AM
I guess I'm a little confused. It sounds like this guy had some pretty good 'issues' for quite sometime...and yet he was still on the force? what a sad world. One more reason to put police in boxes.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

W/ Bob & David - Know Your Rights - Netflix [HD] - YouTube

Meet Gilvin Daughtry. He knows his rights. After being dishonorably discharged from the Navy Seals, Bob Odenkirk and David Cross are back serving our country...
Rob Duke's insight:

Parody: just for fun....

more...
Kelsey Therron Snell's comment, November 6, 2015 6:44 PM
Now that, is freaking hilarious :)!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Why do we not have more videos like this? I think that this is an interesting insight into the police world, although done and performed by citizens, I believe that it shows key elements of officers interactions with people day to day. I do not believe that police are out to get you as is the widespread norm. Too funny. I cant stop watching it
Kelsey Therron Snell's curator insight, November 6, 2015 6:45 PM

Now that, is freaking hilarious :)!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Why do we not have more videos like this? I think that this is an interesting insight into the police world, although done and performed by citizens, I believe that it shows key elements of officers interactions with people day to day. I do not believe that police are out to get you as is the widespread norm. Too funny. I cant stop watching it

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Mexico's Marijuana Ruling Shakes Up Drug Policy

Mexico's Marijuana Ruling Shakes Up Drug Policy | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
A new court ruling could have big implications on the drug war
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

LAPD will collect and report more data on officers’ use of force

LAPD will collect and report more data on officers’ use of force | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES >> The Los Angeles Police Department will collect and report more extensive data about cases in which officers use force, the police chief said Tuesday, adding that the expanded information will help the public better analyze officer
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

When Should S.F. Police Involved in Shootings Get to See Body-Cam Video? | News Fix | KQED News

When Should S.F. Police Involved in Shootings Get to See Body-Cam Video? | News Fix | KQED News | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
As San Francisco’s Police Commission moves toward adopting a body-camera policy by early December, there’s growing concern among city residents, legal scholars and attorneys that allowing officers to view body-camera videos of incidents in which they are potential criminal suspects exposes a double standard in investigations involving police.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a false dichotomy: if you let officers view video, then you're not treating them like you'd treat everyone else.

 

Officers are not like everyone else: First, their use of force is a societal use of force--even the mistakes.  Second, no one else is risking, to the same extent, their freedom, job, home and family.  If a citizen uses force and gives a statement that isn't fully supported by the video, we're often willing to give them some benefit of the doubt due to sensory distortion under stress, but officers are held to the Brady v. Maryland standard and this same sensory distortion can lead to their testimony being suspect in all future cases.  This frequently results in officers being fired: not for the shooting--but for the perceived dishonesty after the fact.  I've been there a couple times and, as I've said before, there were things that happened (verified by witnesses) that I can not remember (a suspect firing shots at me, for instance).

 

My last point is that we need officer's testimony in order to investigate and prosecute in these cases.  If we create this standard, then officers will have no recourse but to refuse to give a statement.  Organizations can and do force officers to give statements, but these are usually only admissible in civil investigations, not criminal ones (for either the criminal case against the suspect or for the potential criminal case against the officer).

 

Now, let's examine what is lost by letting an officer view any video: the only thing we lose (and, I'm not saying that it's insignificant) is the possibility that an officer is clearly in the wrong in the force they used and will alter their story after seeing the video to put as good a face on their actions as possible (I know I always secretly thought I had failed by having to fire my weapon--though these situations are, by definition, out of our control).  In a connected point, we also risk fellow officers will "get their stories straight".

 

That's what you must decide.  Is getting voluntary statements in a timely manner more important than the possibility that officers will match their stories to the video?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Adams County rancher shot and killed by deputies

Adams County rancher shot and killed by deputies | Police Problems and Policy | Scoop.it
COUNCIL, Idaho -- Idaho State Police are investigating an officer-involved shooting in Adams County Monday morning. The shooting happened overnight
more...
No comment yet.